Peter Jessen G Mezzo Soprano - Page 4

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  1. #61
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    Default Re: Peter Jessen G Mezzo Soprano

    Quote Originally Posted by Chicken 'Lil View Post
    I will. I know that 12 months is a long time to wait but I am being proactive in two ways. First, saving money because the thing ain't cheap. And second, I'm transposing a bunch of tunes into G because site transposing from Bb, C or Eb just sound really painful.
    I think transposing on the fly from C would be the most "natural" transposition for the brain, up a forth.

    One thing I have found interesting, is how the mind/brain handles the transition from one "transposing" horn to another. My brain automatically switches into Bb mode as soon as I feel a tenor and soprano in my hands. Same when picking up alto, sopranino or bari. I hear notes and my fingers (generally) go to the right places - that comes from spending enough time playing a given instrument that hearing/playing notes becomes second nature.

    Playing a C-mel or C-soprano kind of blows my mind for a while until I spend some significant time playing them. Just playing a scale causes a feeling of disconnection with the horn - pitches come out that the brain doesn't associate with the fingering. Even worse, there is a disconnect when improvising - hearing a line or melody but the fingers don't naturally head for the places to create those notes. I guess for some folks the jump to a different transposing instrument would be an easier process than for others. It is possible than some players don't have such a strong association between fingering and pitch and could more easily play without the distraction of the pitches being at different fingerings then the brain has programmed.

    This is all to say, that I expect the same disconnected would occur when you first start playing the G-mezzo. Maybe it might take only a day or two to incorporate its unique pitch/fingering transposition into your playing process.

    Another interesting thing about an instrument in G is that you will end up playing in more "flat" keys than "sharp" keys. A song that is in the concert key of "G" would be played in E on an alto but in C on a G-mezzo. A tune in Eb would be in F on tenor/soprano but in Ab on G-mezzo. Its a game changer when playing in "guitar keys".

    Anyway, please keep us updated on your adventure with the G-mezzo!

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  3. #62

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    Default Re: Peter Jessen G Mezzo Soprano

    I found that when I began playing C melody, my lip would automatically try to lip down the pitch into Bb because my ears were so used to a C sounding like Concert Bb.

    I was trying SO HARD to figure out what the **** was going on with pitch! Then it clicked.

    Quirks of transposition, eh?

  4. #63

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    Default Re: Peter Jessen G Mezzo Soprano

    Quote Originally Posted by Chicken 'Lil View Post
    I have been checking so frequently I'm kind of going nuts. Long story short, the money transfer took longer than expected, the shipping was goofed up and the stars all were aligned against me. Now the horn is out of customs and should be here tomorrow. Peter was pretty happy about this horn (which I'm both not and totally surprised by). He's a bit, well Danish, so very understated. He seems to think that this is a good one. I'm sure that they are all good ones. Anyway, I've been shedding a ton of soprano (much to my family's consternation) for the past month. Tomorrow I will be sitting by the door all day until it comes.


    Pics and video to follow.
    How did it all end up? Happy owner of the G mezzo?

  5. #64
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    Default Re: Peter Jessen G Mezzo Soprano

    Sounds like something fun if I ever win the Powerball.
    Yamaha YTS-62iii tenor/Paraschos Selmer Neck/Vandoren T20/Vandoren MO/L�g�re Signature Series 3.5
    Cannonball BBSS Brute alto/Vandoren AL5/Vandoren MO/L�g�re Signature Series 3.5
    Buffet Prodige clarinet/Vandoren Masters CL6/Vandoren MO/L�g�re Signature Series 3.5

  6. #65
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    Default Re: Peter Jessen G Mezzo Soprano

    The Danish link in the OP’s post seems to have gone dead. The YouTube link is still good.

    Here are two other YouTube videos on the GMS. The first is an interview with English subtitles if you click CC.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pySkpXI6_Q

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QpRKMcqRjuw

    Did anyone ever find out if these are played with a custom built mouthpiece or what?

    Thanks, Peter Jessen for making these additions to the saxophone family.
    Soprano: New soprano coming soon; Alto: Noblet "Face" model (Beaugnier ?);
    Vintage C-Mel Tenor project: Evette-Schaeffer, Buffet-Crampon Clarinet: Yamaha

  7. #66
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    Default Re: Peter Jessen G Mezzo Soprano

    The horn plays well with a normal soprano mouthpiece. The three I've played were in tune for me on a vintage Selmer metal classic (working with Peter has its perks).
    Maybe one day I'll get the hang of all this.

  8. #67
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    Default Re: Peter Jessen G Mezzo Soprano

    Thanks, I think it is really smart to use a standard-sized mouthpiece. The neck looks disproportionately long to me. I wondered if it was designed to use soprano piece.
    Soprano: New soprano coming soon; Alto: Noblet "Face" model (Beaugnier ?);
    Vintage C-Mel Tenor project: Evette-Schaeffer, Buffet-Crampon Clarinet: Yamaha

  9. #68

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    Default Re: Peter Jessen G Mezzo Soprano

    Peter gives you a choice of usually a hard rubber or metal mpc when you purchase the horn. His mpc's are really quite good. I had a hard time choosing but stuck with the hard rubber for nuance. His instrument is a fantastic addition to the saxophone family. Regular soprano mpc's work but the horn seems to play better and fuller with the mpc of his design

  10. #69
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    Default Re: Peter Jessen G Mezzo Soprano

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  11. #70
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    Default Re: Peter Jessen G Mezzo Soprano

    Quote Originally Posted by brasscane View Post
    I think the instrument is fabulous.

    One of the most interesting aspects to me is the decision to pitch it in the key of G instead of F. For ensemble play, there is lot s of music written in F and not a lot written in G. However, we are not used to hearing G-instruments, so that is a more unique sound. G is a little more soprano and F is more alto sounding. There are corresponding arguments for the key of A, which I imagine would sound like a throatier Bb soprano, but it is a familiar sound.

    I look forward to hearing the instrument in a variety of genres and by a variety of players. Please share if you get to play one of these.
    Soprano: New soprano coming soon; Alto: Noblet "Face" model (Beaugnier ?);
    Vintage C-Mel Tenor project: Evette-Schaeffer, Buffet-Crampon Clarinet: Yamaha

  12. #71
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    Default Re: Peter Jessen G Mezzo Soprano

    Quote Originally Posted by twocircles View Post
    I think the instrument is fabulous.

    One of the most interesting aspects to me is the decision to pitch it in the key of G instead of F. For ensemble play, there is lot s of music written in F and not a lot written in G. However, we are not used to hearing G-instruments, so that is a more unique sound. G is a little more soprano and F is more alto sounding. There are corresponding arguments for the key of A, which I imagine would sound like a throatier Bb soprano, but it is a familiar sound.

    I look forward to hearing the instrument in a variety of genres and by a variety of players. Please share if you get to play one of these.
    I am unsure if this was addressed to me. I am an amateur and have only tried a couple of the prototypes, which is entirely my own fault. They were made with a copper body and discarded one after another in rapid succession such that most of the keywork could be reused for improved bodies. I have heard Peter, Benjamin Koppel, Fredeik Lundin, Joe Lovano, and Chicken 'Lil of SOTW play it. They all have this warm woody sound on the instrument. To me, it puts the wood in woodwind more than any other sax that I have heard and, besides jazz, begs for being utilized for classical music, tango, klezmer, lots of third world music (not sure this term is PC, but anyway), as well as popular music of varying kinds. However, it calls for someone thinking slight out of the box. Benjamin Koppel is about as open-minded and gifted as they come. He plays just about anything except for tenor sax, but he mainly lives and works in Denmark, which may have limited the visibility of the G mezzo. There are other hurdles for the instrument to be played "in a variety of genres and by a variety of players". Some I cannot share. Others seem to be just plain skepticism towards something that is different and perhaps worries of ending up with an instrument that is not taken seriously? In many ways it seems really peculiar to me with so many sax players looking for "their" sound and yet one can achieve very unique sounds with the G mezzo, which can serve as a canvas for loads of novel ideas.
    Forum contributor 2007-2013

  13. #72
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    Default Re: Peter Jessen G Mezzo Soprano

    Quote Originally Posted by brasscane View Post
    I am unsure if this was addressed to me.
    I was just generally musing about the creative process, and trying to understand the minds of Peter and those involved in the decision making in the design of this sax. It is not surprising that it has first found a home in jazz, where unique and previously unheard sounds are highly valued. It might yet find a place in orchestras, where the F instruments abound. I would have probably made the mistake choosing the key of F as a better choice, but I think the strength of this horn will ultimately be its unique timbre.

    Again, I would really love to hear it played in other genres by other players.

    Thank you for sharing your experiences and insights.
    Soprano: New soprano coming soon; Alto: Noblet "Face" model (Beaugnier ?);
    Vintage C-Mel Tenor project: Evette-Schaeffer, Buffet-Crampon Clarinet: Yamaha

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