Sonny Rollins on "Tour De Force"

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    Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2010 magical pig's Avatar
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    Default Sonny Rollins on "Tour De Force"

    Bonsoir,

    anyone have this album? Do you know what Sonny took before the session? I mean, he's playing like a nutcase, crazy stuff, on top of the time etc.!!!! And some of the tunes on this album must be the fastest I've ever listened to



    Victor.

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    Forum Contributor 2009 cleger's Avatar
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    I haven't listened to that one in a while. I put it on so I could remind myself of what it was like. Here's the AMG description and background:

    By December 1956, when Tour de Force was cut, Sonny Rollins had already made impressive albums with Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk and under his own name, and was already emerging as one of the great jazz tenor saxophonists of all time. His big tone and aggressive style linked him to the Coleman Hawkins school, although his main influence was Charlie Parker. Though it caused little comment when it was released and has since largely been forgotten, Tour de Force ranks among Rollins' most interesting and unusual albums.

    On the opening track "Ee-ah," a blues, Rollins uses a short recurring figure which resembles the braying of a mule; "Two Different Worlds" and "My Ideal" contain Billy Eckstine-like vocals by Earl Coleman and some pretty Rollins solos. On "Sonny Boy," Rollins, backed by pianist Kenny Drew, bassist George Morrow and drummer Max Roach, is near his best, turning in characteristically hard-driving work.

    But the two most amazing tracks are "B. Quick," based on "Cherokee," and "B. Swift," based on "Lover." Here Rollins challenges himself to play as fast as he possibly can, and he does play amazingly fast — so fast that he doesn't swing much, despite his remarkable chops. Swinging requires an element of relaxation, and Rollins is clearly not into relaxing during these hell-bent-for-leather solos. But then Sonny Rollins didn't emphasize swing — he played a different kind of way. In fact, "B. Quick" and "B. Swift" resemble the kind of solos Albert Ayler would've played — if Ayler had played on changes. Whether listeners like these two tracks depends on their taste, but after all these years people should take another listen to these iconoclastic sides.


    This album is available at eMusic if anyone is interested in a listen. I love this era of Sonny's music.
    Frivolous, Vexatious and Outrageous

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    Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2010 magical pig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cleger
    In fact, "B. Quick" and "B. Swift" resemble the kind of solos Albert Ayler would've played — if Ayler had played on changes. Whether listeners like these two tracks depends on their taste, but after all these years people should take another listen to these iconoclastic sides.[/I]
    I thought it sounded almost like free as well... I think I'll be listening to that album for a while. But... back to the shed first!

    Victor.

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    One of the greatest jazz albums ever made, in my opinion. Abstract, relentless, fierce - not words one would usually associate with Sonny. A total masterpiece. Not as much fun as "Colossus" but just as good, in its way. (you may have noticed that i quite like this album )
    "The sound of tireless voices is the price we pay for the right to hear the music of our own opinions."

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    Forum Contributor 2008/Distinguished SOTW Member Swampcabbage's Avatar
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    I was first introduced to the stellar cuts of this album under the album named "Sonny Boy", truly amazing and inspiring stuff.

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