Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28
  1. #1
    jswers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Bethesda, MD
    Posts
    755
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    Sirius XM's Carolina Shag channel has had me listening to a lot of 40s-50s-60s R&B lately. Much of these songs have short, punchy sax solos. Here are some examples of songs I heard on Carolina Shag recently:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbiVca7UMxY
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vn8toB5pZr8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42y3dzsIkHA

    Although these solos are not terribly complicated, they are beautifully crafted and really add guts to the song. These songs had to be jukebox friendly and could not exceed around 3 minutes so it was important to say what you wanted to say in a short space, grab the listener immediately, and not let them go until the short solo is finished. Were these types of solos written beforehand or were they improvised on the spot? I have been trying to transcribe many of these solos and I find a wealth of creativity within a limited space. My guess is that these were partly improvised over a general plan formulated beforehand, but I do not know for sure. I am just wondering because it will take me some time to feel like a I can belt out a solo like this with the confidence and swagger needed to really pull it off. Some people may dismiss this kind of sax solo as easy stuff but I never have and after some study I am even more impressed with what these greats of the past were able to do.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    SaxOnTheWeb.net
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2

    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    167
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    That sort of music is rarely written out beyond maybe a lead sheet. The studio musicians make up their parts and solos. Since they have several takes, the initial improvised solo gets honed into the well crafted version you hear on the final recording. Check out "Muscle Shoals" and "The Wrecking Crew" on Netflix for a lot of great insight on the artists and recordings of this period.

  4. #3
    Distinguished SOTW Member 1saxman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    The Old Dominion
    Posts
    4,723
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    It varies. Solos by nature are almost never 'written' - the idea is for the sax player to 'take a ride' in the song to add excitement. However in some cases the musicians knew the song before it was recorded as they had been playing it live at dances/shows so the soloist just did what he already knew. In many cases the soloists were 'hit men' who had reputations for doing great rides, like King Curtis or Plas Johnson. These guys walked into the studio, listened to the scratch track and then laid down a solo that we are still studying!
    You are right to respect what these guys did because the ability to play that way has been largely lost. You will learn a lot by trying to emulate some of those players. That's exactly what I did during the late '50s into the '60s - I wore out plenty of records trying to learn those rides. Funny, but I never played on a '50s show until last year when I joined one. The guys were amazed when I started reeling off those rides with every nuance. They had never heard anyone play that way live before. But more importantly, what I learned how to do all those years ago served as the foundation for everything I was to do for the next 60 years.
    The 'shag' channel is okay, but if you really want to get gassed, check out channel 5, the '50s channel. Many of the shag songs are recent recordings and the sax players are not very exciting. Wait til you hear Lee Allen's ride on Little Richards 'Good Golly Miss Molly'. That thing will make a dog dance!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQ6akiGRcL8

  5. Remove Advertisements
    SaxOnTheWeb.net
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4

    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    680
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    Yeah, these early Doo-wop, R&B, and Rock'n Roll sax solos are so inspiring The forms are so short and sweet and I think all those players really dug into how to craft those gems. As raucous as they come off, it is surprising how sophisticated they in fact are.. I think they probably practiced ideas beforehand but I have a feeling they knew this stuff so well that they could feel it and improvise on the spot. Some more than others I expect.

  7. #5
    SOTW Columnist/ Forum Contributor 2014
    Distinguished SOTW Member
    John Laughter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Macon, Ga
    Posts
    2,004
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?


  8. #6
    jswers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Bethesda, MD
    Posts
    755
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    Quote Originally Posted by 1saxman View Post
    It varies. Solos by nature are almost never 'written' - the idea is for the sax player to 'take a ride' in the song to add excitement. However in some cases the musicians knew the song before it was recorded as they had been playing it live at dances/shows so the soloist just did what he already knew. In many cases the soloists were 'hit men' who had reputations for doing great rides, like King Curtis or Plas Johnson. These guys walked into the studio, listened to the scratch track and then laid down a solo that we are still studying!
    You are right to respect what these guys did because the ability to play that way has been largely lost. You will learn a lot by trying to emulate some of those players. That's exactly what I did during the late '50s into the '60s - I wore out plenty of records trying to learn those rides. Funny, but I never played on a '50s show until last year when I joined one. The guys were amazed when I started reeling off those rides with every nuance. They had never heard anyone play that way live before. But more importantly, what I learned how to do all those years ago served as the foundation for everything I was to do for the next 60 years.
    The 'shag' channel is okay, but if you really want to get gassed, check out channel 5, the '50s channel. Many of the shag songs are recent recordings and the sax players are not very exciting. Wait til you hear Lee Allen's ride on Little Richards 'Good Golly Miss Molly'. That thing will make a dog dance!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQ6akiGRcL8
    I agree that Lee Allen is the master. I am in my 40s, so all of this music was from before I was born. I already knew of the popular guys like Lee Allen and have listened to lots of Little Richard which I love. I do listen to Sirius 50s on 5 but what I like about the Carolina Shag channel is that they play a lot of tracks I have never heard before and the channel crosses decades within a genre. This channel has opened up further opportunities for me to listen to songs where sax played the defining solo of a song rather than guitar.

    I love the term "take a ride" and I feel it really encapsulates what these guys are doing. Thanks for your insights. I agree that it is rare to hear someone really pull off one of these "rides" anymore. Perhaps someday I can show the kids today a thing or two and blow one of these "rides". I am going to keep working at it, but for me it is every bit as tough as learning to play like the jazz greats of the past.

  9. #7
    jswers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Bethesda, MD
    Posts
    755
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    Quote Originally Posted by John Laughter View Post
    John, I know you have deep, extensive knowledge of rock and roll saxophone. Have you ever created a playlist of these brilliant sax solos that includes some of the lesser known tracks (less popular than the stuff that is commonly played on an oldies channel)? Some of these songs may not be great songs and not get much play but still have killer sax solos.

    I have never heard of Charlie Edwards, but I do know of Red Prysock, he is one awesome player. Lee Allen, Sam Butera, and Red Prysock are already on my radar. I want to hear other guys who I have not heard of as well. If these guys were improvising this stuff on the spot with all the effects/etc they deserve to be studied and emulated.

  10. #8
    SOTW Columnist/ Forum Contributor 2014
    Distinguished SOTW Member
    John Laughter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Macon, Ga
    Posts
    2,004
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    Have you ever created a playlist of these brilliant sax solos that includes some of the lesser known tracks
    Hey and thanks. My research has been Top 40 hits in R&R, R&B and Pop in general starting in 1955. I grew up listening to a lot of the lessor known songs that were in the Top 100 hits and have looked for certain players for the same reason on Youtube but I have not kept a list. My Top 40 research started in 1999 and and the list is over 500 pages.

    Once in a while an SOTW member will post what you are looking for and others will add more. Some excellent old tracks. Not sure where those are listed on this site.

    As for your original question, I would imagine that it was session by session just as it is today. Some by ear, some written. Some of the players may have been in their own band and already had a solo set in mind. Some singers have an idea in mind in the studio and sing it to the sax player. Some studios had/have their "first call" list of heavy hitters who could/can listen to the song a couple of times and add a solo that went along with the style. In some cases the studio would play the song and the sax player would start ad-libing ideas just warming up and the studio would be recording it and would end up using the "warming up" licks. "Honky Tonk" by Bill Doggett was an instrumental ad-lib they used at many of their dances which became very popular with the dancers. When they decided to record it to make a record the engineer went out of the studio for a smoke and let the recording tape run which ended up long enough to make Parts 1 and 2.

    In more recent years some songs have tried 2-3 instruments and different musicians to play the solo until they got the sound and style they wanted. I would imagine that also happened back in the day as well once they were able to "dub in" another player/solo before the final mix.

    We all have names of players who inspired us over the years. Those were the ones who ended up on the records. However, as you have pointed out, there are so many other awesome sax players from years gone by whose names are not known. That would be a major research to find those recordings and track down those who played in the studio session or recorded it live.

    Great subject. Thanks for posting the question.

  11. #9
    SOTW Columnist
    Distinguished SOTW Member
    JL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    19,667
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    I think John answered the question very well in his post above and he's highly knowledgeable on the subject. But I would be very surprised if any of these blues/early R&R sax solos were written out. Some were certainly improvised on the spot, in the studio. Others were likely worked out ahead of time on gigs, where a tune may have been played a lot, the solo improvised originally and then parts of it repeated, eventually becoming somewhat of a 'signature solo.' From what I've heard, this is kind of how Honky Tonk evolved, as John says.

  12. #10
    Distinguished SOTW Member
    Forum Contributor 2011
    MartinMusicMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    12,150
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    I live and breathe these sax solos. They are the reason I wanted to be a sax player when I was a kid. I heard those wailing sax solos and thought "that's what I want to do." Lee Allen on Little Richard records, Plas Johnson on Larry Williams "Boney Maronie", King Curtis on all those Coasters records, Herb Hardesty on Fats Domino. I believe most of those solos were improvised. Some of the backing parts or fills, like on Boney Maronie or Coasters records were planned out, as in call and response, but I believe that the sax players had a significant hand in deciding what to play. Then the solos took off from there. Those great, punchy, compact solos sound improvised to me because they have so much feeling in them. The sax player is pushing hard, really leaning in to the solo and expressing as much feeling as he can. That's why they're so exciting. I love playing that style and taking a 2-chorus solo on old rock and R&B tunes. That's sax playing heaven to me.

    Special big thanks to John Laughter for his History of Top 40 Sax Solos, my go to sax reference for these solos. Get it from John, then listen to all those solos.
    The Martin "Official Music Man" tenor, Barone black tenor, The Martin baritone, Richards Martin Indiana alto, Martin Handcraft alto, cheap Chinese soprano, Roland Aerophone AE10, Metalite mouthpieces, Plasticover reeds, Nord Electro 5D, bunch of other instruments

  13. #11
    Distinguished SOTW Member
    Forum Contributor 2011
    MartinMusicMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    12,150
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    My band used to play this tune. Bullmoose Jackson was a sax player. There's a couple of good solos in this recording
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rws_7mLTqj8
    The Martin "Official Music Man" tenor, Barone black tenor, The Martin baritone, Richards Martin Indiana alto, Martin Handcraft alto, cheap Chinese soprano, Roland Aerophone AE10, Metalite mouthpieces, Plasticover reeds, Nord Electro 5D, bunch of other instruments

  14. #12
    jswers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Bethesda, MD
    Posts
    755
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    Quote Originally Posted by MartinMusicMan View Post
    My band used to play this tune. Bullmoose Jackson was a sax player. There's a couple of good solos in this recording
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rws_7mLTqj8
    I love Bullmoose Jackson! I forgot about him. "My Big 10 Inch", isn't it great that they could get away with this back then? Society was more prudish, but people still found a way to have their fun.

  15. #13
    jswers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Bethesda, MD
    Posts
    755
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    Quote Originally Posted by John Laughter View Post
    Hey and thanks. My research has been Top 40 hits in R&R, R&B and Pop in general starting in 1955. I grew up listening to a lot of the lessor known songs that were in the Top 100 hits and have looked for certain players for the same reason on Youtube but I have not kept a list. My Top 40 research started in 1999 and and the list is over 500 pages.

    Once in a while an SOTW member will post what you are looking for and others will add more. Some excellent old tracks. Not sure where those are listed on this site.

    As for your original question, I would imagine that it was session by session just as it is today. Some by ear, some written. Some of the players may have been in their own band and already had a solo set in mind. Some singers have an idea in mind in the studio and sing it to the sax player. Some studios had/have their "first call" list of heavy hitters who could/can listen to the song a couple of times and add a solo that went along with the style. In some cases the studio would play the song and the sax player would start ad-libing ideas just warming up and the studio would be recording it and would end up using the "warming up" licks. "Honky Tonk" by Bill Doggett was an instrumental ad-lib they used at many of their dances which became very popular with the dancers. When they decided to record it to make a record the engineer went out of the studio for a smoke and let the recording tape run which ended up long enough to make Parts 1 and 2.

    In more recent years some songs have tried 2-3 instruments and different musicians to play the solo until they got the sound and style they wanted. I would imagine that also happened back in the day as well once they were able to "dub in" another player/solo before the final mix.

    We all have names of players who inspired us over the years. Those were the ones who ended up on the records. However, as you have pointed out, there are so many other awesome sax players from years gone by whose names are not known. That would be a major research to find those recordings and track down those who played in the studio session or recorded it live.

    Great subject. Thanks for posting the question.
    Thanks for this, you are a great source of information. I am sure it would be a major undertaking to discover the names of all the unsung heroes who belted out awesome solos on those old records and few beyond SOTW would appreciate it. As of now, if I hear a song on Sirius that I like I am writing it down to create my own list. I only have a a few dozen songs of likely thousands that should be included.

  16. #14
    Forum Contributor 2015-2016 SHOZZA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Manchester, UK.
    Posts
    11,943
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    I'm a great fan of the Doo-Wop sax solos, I've been trying to play them for years. Some are a lot harder than others to learn, those guys were absolute masters at creating exciting solos. I've always loved Buddy Lucas who played the sax breaks on Dions big hits. Also Jackie Kelso on Sam Cooks "Twistin The Night Away" where he plays Flutter Tongue, taught to him by Clifford Scott. I also love Plas Johnsons sax solo on Ernie Fields version of "In The Mood" Those guys were very special to me when I was growing up, even though I was a Drummer in my youth, still am to be honest.

  17. #15
    Distinguished SOTW Member
    Forum Contributor 2011
    MartinMusicMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    12,150
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    Gene Barge was Daddy G on Gary U.S. Bonds' hit "Quarter To Three" and on "A Night With Daddy G."
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoopfp5iaKw
    The Martin "Official Music Man" tenor, Barone black tenor, The Martin baritone, Richards Martin Indiana alto, Martin Handcraft alto, cheap Chinese soprano, Roland Aerophone AE10, Metalite mouthpieces, Plasticover reeds, Nord Electro 5D, bunch of other instruments

  18. #16
    Forum Contributor 2015-2016 SHOZZA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Manchester, UK.
    Posts
    11,943
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    Quote Originally Posted by MartinMusicMan View Post
    Gene Barge was Daddy G on Gary U.S. Bonds' hit "Quarter To Three" and on "A Night With Daddy G."
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoopfp5iaKw
    Yeah, he was another of my favourites, I loved "A Night With Daddy G" I think he was probably the guy that set me off loving tenor sax's, along with Red Price in the UK.
    I also loved "School Is Out" and "School Is In," great solo on the latter.
    Cheers Rob.

  19. #17
    Forum Contributor 2013 graphicguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    494
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    great short solos, thx for sharing; I really like the one on Wynonie Harris - My Playful Baby's Gone https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42y3dzsIkHA they rocked it
    Sax player

  20. #18
    Distinguished SOTW Member
    Forum Contributor 2014
    Saxhound's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Knoxville, TN Area (escaped from Illinois)
    Posts
    1,145
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    It's been mentioned before, but check out The Big Horn if you can find a copy. Unfortunately it seems to be out of print.

    Also Honkers & Bar Walkers. Multiple volumes in this set.

  21. #19
    SOTW Columnist/ Forum Contributor 2014
    Distinguished SOTW Member
    John Laughter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Macon, Ga
    Posts
    2,004
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    Special big thanks to John Laughter for his History of Top 40 Sax Solos, my go to sax reference for these solos. Get it from John, then listen to all those solos.
    I really appreciate the “thanks”. Means a lot to me BUT I have to say that this project could not have been done (and still going) without the help of many people all over the globe. With their help (since 1999) we have photos, bios, emails and personal stories about some of the sessions. In a few cases we found the wrong name attached to a sax solo but we have been able to get the story straight with the correct name. However, we are still trying to confirm the name for several hit records that have given credit (on the NET) to two players;

    SPECIAL THANKS

    In grateful acknowledgement to all those who contributed their time and talents to help make this book a reality. It was a privilege to work with each of you and to share my enthusiasm for this project. Many thanks and I hope you enjoy the history.

    Bonnie Buckley, Lisa Eichholzer-Walker, Steve Nieves, David Edwards, Darren Jones, Carl-Goran Cederblad, Joey Arminio, Robert Harwell, Johnny Colla, Rob Sudduth, Dave Woodford, Mark Rybiski, Joe McGlohon, Gregg W. Jackson, Todd & Sharon Peach, Jeff Neavor, Phil Brennan, Tommy Maguire, Lori Allred, Jan Bach, Carl Magnus Palm, Dave Boruff, Tony Valdez, Pieter Wever, Wayne Jackson, Nick Jones, Sean Coughlin, Marc Miller, Janet St. Pierre, Chad Shireman, Grady Gaines, Jr., Lon Price, Tyrone Settlemier, Roystan N. Simonds, Johnny Padilla, John Briggs, Curtis Swift, Tom Savonick, Sam Morgan, Jr., Helen Kahlke, Paul Lanfermeijer, Frank McNulty, Steve Goodson, Paul R. Coats, Ed Calle, Phil Kenzie, Rik Hull, Mike Clark, Jim Britt, Chris “Snake” Davis, Steve & Ladonna Hart, Brandon Fields, Julian Barker, Marty Jourard, Bob Malach, Ed Frost, Joey Dee, Laurent Hunziker, Boots Randolph, Pete Christlieb, Jeff Pilcicki, Frank Demar, Steve Groove, Joel C. Peskin, Lance Blakeslee, Clifford P. Walker, Edward Chmelewski, Andrew Clark, Carl Griffin, Ron Chavira, Kirk Pengilly, Ann Williams, Paulo Chagas, Plas Johnson, Paul Latanishen, Cathy Ravet, Gary Hartle, Robert Weaver, Phil Upchurch, Jim Grant, Bill Champney, Steve Goodson, Tim Price, Brian Axelrod, Paul Fowler, Don Wise, Michael Fitzgerald, Pat Benti, Gary Sizemore, Jerry Schulteis, Mike Laroche, Christen Depetro, Bryan Savage, Anthony & Karen Simone, Gordon Beadle, William Flannery, Oliver Garai, Ace Cannon, Chris Vadala, Ernie Watts, Ralph Orozco, John Donatelli, Jr., Patrick Sporrij, Fred Vigdor, Ron Barton, Barbara Lang, Eric Leblanc, Anthony Borgosano, Dave Williams, Paul Anthony Ciulla, Warner Alas, Neil Sharpe, Joey Batcha, Maxine Batcha, Dr. George Britt, Nick Messina, Kent Karcher, Jenny Lassi, Timmy Cappello, DQ, Stuart Colman, David Carroll, Carole Allen, Steve Marshall, Tom Wilson, Vic Middleton, Dan Cipriano, Adam Michlin, Dirk Peeters, Pete Thomas, Chris Turner, Terri Hinte, Paul Hanson, Mike Terry, Craig Shields, Charles A. King, Gaye D. Funk (final editing), Lee Laughter, Julie Laughter, Amy Laughter, Keith Gemmell, Kevin Davidge, Maria Granditsky, Sheryl Laukat, Gordon Stump, Martin Entwistle, DJ Raz, Mickey Kipler, Bob Samuel, Herb Hardesty, Alto Reed, Celebration, The Grapevine, my GEICO friends, Bibb Music Center, Rovner Products, Erin James, Kevin Kuptz, Kasuku Mafia, Marlies van Lier, Joseph Ballaera, Mike Douglas, Herb Kalin, Diane Haney-photos/scanning, Dwayne Boswell-CD recording, web sites; Sax On The Web (Harri Rautiainen), alt.music.saxophone, George Porter, Jr., Kevin Leighton, Stephanie Clark, Greg Dzurinda, Stephen Shippey, Steve Grainger, Stephen Howard, Michelle C. Williams, Palo Tung, Steve Grainger, Dave Gilbertson, Nathan Hull, Hank Facer, Ben “King” Perkoff, Jeff Powell, Jan Willem, Dave Appell, Hans Christian Dörrscheidt, David Link, Al Fisher, Bill Barner, Phil Dixon, John Chmielewski, Alan Leeds, Heinrich Buttler, Frank Elmo, Curt Allen, Mark Deke McGee, Artie Kaplan, Louis Lince, Kim Russell, Keith Fontaine, Gaz Gaskell, Don C. Dennis, Martin Dobson, Keith Reding, Gio Washington-Wright, Gary Herbig, Bill Turner, Alex Frazer-Harrison, Michael Robinson, Ray Beavis, Will Beavis, Slavina Ivanova, Link Jr., Chris Buckley, Jules Lawrence, Cliff Marsh, Tia Sinclair, Business Manager (Gang Touring, Inc. f/s/o Kool & The Gang), Lenny Pickett, Jeff Hardcastle, Dik de Heer, Kari Krug, Jimmy Ogburn, Charles A. King, Jeff Peterson, George Young, Colin Hall, Phil Pryor, Thomas Fyledal, Bill Young, Paul Croteau, Simo Sutela, Harold J. Winley, D.C. Baker, Matt Cox, Russ Strathdee, Tim Gillett, Arnold Pol, Joe Sublett

    A special thanks to Steve D. Marshall in England for helping with so many U.K. hits. It has been interesting to hear those U.K. hits that never made it to the U.S.

    We have two lists if you want one or both. The “short list” (as I call it) is 105 pages with the song, chart position, year, artist and sax player. A quick reference so to speak.

    The complete version (photos, bios, etc.) in PDF is over 500 pages and can be sent by email. So far no one has had an issue opening it on their computer.

    If you want either list (short list or PDF) just send a private message with your email address or you can send an email directly to me if you have my address. If for some reason the PDF does go through I will let you know. Also give me some time to respond.

    You never know who might have a Top 40 hit to add or you might see an incorrect name attached to a song. Both lists continue to be updated. Thanks.

    I live and breathe these sax solos. They are the reason I wanted to be a sax player when I was a kid.
    Yes indeed!!

    Thanks for this, you are a great source of information.
    "We" appreciate it

  22. #20
    jswers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Bethesda, MD
    Posts
    755
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Are 40s-50s-60s rock/r&b sax solos improvised or were they written beforehand?

    Quote Originally Posted by Saxhound View Post
    It's been mentioned before, but check out The Big Horn if you can find a copy. Unfortunately it seems to be out of print.

    Also Honkers & Bar Walkers. Multiple volumes in this set.
    I have The Big Horn, it is a great collection. Most of the pieces are sax only with a band but without vocals. They are not R&B tracks with vocals and with a short sax solo in the middle.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •