Martin Indiana Tenor Ergonomics

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Hi Everyone,

    I've been learning on a Martin Indiana tenor and have been struggling a bit with the palm keys. The lowest palm key to play the high F is especially far away. I play with the horn in front. Is there a particular playing position that is better with this type of horn? I should note that I am 6'2" and have fairly large hands.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    SaxOnTheWeb.net
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,092
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Martin Indiana Tenor Ergonomics

    You can put risers on the keys to better fit your hand.

  4. #3

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Martin Indiana Tenor Ergonomics

    Quote Originally Posted by bruce bailey View Post
    You can put risers on the keys to better fit your hand.
    I have them actually. That particular note is especially hard on the Indiana as it's much lower. I was curious if anyone has any thoughts on whether this is a playing position issue, or just a nuance of an old horn. I know the newer horns have the keys offcenter to be a bit more ergonomic.

  5. Remove Advertisements
    SaxOnTheWeb.net
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,092
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Martin Indiana Tenor Ergonomics

    There is a possibility that the key can actually be bent up a bit or to the side and then a thicker cork put underneath.

  7. #5

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,029
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Martin Indiana Tenor Ergonomics

    Quote Originally Posted by bruce bailey View Post
    There is a possibility that the key can actually be bent up a bit or to the side and then a thicker cork put underneath.
    Pretty much every sax I have owned, I have had to do some combination of judicious bending and application of risers to the palm keys. To me, this just comes with the territory. Everyone's hands are shaped differently.

    That said, the standard technique for tenor, baritone, and bass sax is to have the instrument hang to the right, though many people do successfully play the tenor centered in front when standing. Alto can be either, although personally I play alto to the right so the playing position is as similar as possible among all the horns.

    I would recommend that you start with the standard playing position and decide whether to deviate from that when you have enough experience to decide for yourself. Also, very few people are large enough to play seated with tenor between their legs and not have interferences. Sooner or later, you are going to have to play seated.

  8. #6

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •