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Thread: Facing Length

  1. #21
    Distinguished SOTW Member Sebastian's Avatar
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    Default Re: Facing Length

    Quote Originally Posted by Nefertiti View Post
    I wish they made a glass gauge that had an edge on it that you could just push the tip of the mouthpiece against. The most frustrating thing for me is trying to get the tip at 0 and then hold it steady. My hand would get tired and then the mouthpiece would slide on the glass and I would have to start all over. If there was an edge at 0 you could just hold the mouthpiece against the edge. No?
    It's harder to do if the table isn't good and the mouthpiece slides around. A reasonable grip is required but you shouldn't have to fatigue your hand to get a consistent measurement.

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  3. #22
    Distinguished SOTW Member Sebastian's Avatar
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    Default Re: Facing Length

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Fleming View Post
    There is such a gauge, but it isn't glass. The post above refers to a mechanic's ruler that is end indexed. Here is another blog that shows how to use it.

    http://stuffsax.blogspot.com/2013/11...o-examine.html

    The mechanic's gauge isn't glass, so you can't drop it and break it. It costs 1/10th of a glass gauge. It is more accurate (.5mm metric instead of wide, laser etched 1mm lines). It is end indexed for more consistent measuring. I find it to be easier to hold than a glass ruler.

    So what is the downside of this superior and less expensive metal ruler? You can't see through it. Why is it important to be able to see through a mouthpiece ruler? Tradition. Actually, it is only tradition since Eric Brand started marketing glass rulers in the 1940's. I doubt that glass mouthpiece rulers were in general use before then. Spend $5 and try a metal ruler. You might like it.

    Mark
    I've seen original ones that were used at Pompano Beach at the Otto Link Factory. They're graded differently but they did use glass gauges at least some of the time.

  4. #23
    Distinguished SOTW Member 1saxman's Avatar
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    Default Re: Facing Length

    OP, your meaning is clear but in fact, as others have said, gathering this data proves nothing. I know I'm not alone in this but I no longer really care about the specifics of a mouthpiece. It blows or it doesn't blow, and you'll find plenty of examples of both kinds with short, medium and long facings. As a young player, pre-internet, I bought a Brilhart Level Air with *(short) facing because the rumor was it made high notes easier. Well, I believed it, and sure enough, the high notes popped with it. LOL Basically the same thing with tip openings - it really would be best to try mouthpieces and have no idea of anything about them. In other words, you could determine your favorite specifications based on a great mouthpiece you found, have another one made to that spec, and find it to totally stink. I have commissioned a mouthpiece myself, including sending the original to the guy, and when the clone came, it was of no use to me. It played, but it was simply not the same. Now for the real shocker; a great mouthpiece is a work of art that is one stroke of the file away from junk. Dave Guardala said that if you 'touched' one of his pieces, it would be ruined forever. Many have laughed at that but it is true. If anybody could make mouthpieces as well as he did, then they would become just as valuable. He himself designed the highly accurate 'Laser-Trimmed' process that was based on precise measurements of perfect prototypes he made, but even though all those mouthpieces played fine, none of them had that elusive 'something' that a great hand-finished one has and that's what makes them so valuable.
    So, just saying, if a successful and world-renowned mouthpiece maker could not duplicate even his own work with computer-controlled equipment with specs based on the most accurate measurements, what exactly do you hope to accomplish?

  5. #24
    Distinguished SOTW Member/Mouthpiece Guru MojoBari's Avatar
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    Default Re: Facing Length

    I agree with nearly all of that. But the "Laser Trimmed" process is just a marketing term for the early adoption of precise CNC machining. The use of Lasers in the process is a myth. The LTs were just out sourced to CNC machine shops that had better capabilities than DG's in house machines. These shops could consistently make a playable mouthpiece without any hand finishing. After the first production run, Guardala was no longer involved even with inspecting what was being produced. WWBW had an agreement with DG that allowed them to out source the production and sell the LT mouthpieces for several years.

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