Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

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    Unhappy Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    I had a visit today from a good friend who I have jammed with a lot. He's a professional keyboard player, singer and band and choir leader and gigs a lot plus plays at a number of jams cause he loves to play. We got on to the subject of the ones that we both have played at particularly the one on Friday nights which I have been a regular at for two years now. We were talking about how it is so loud because the guitar players all crank it up so much and I mentioned I have to sit in the back except when on stage because of it.


    Then I mentioned how I'd love to be able to go there tonight for the St. Paddy's day Jam cause it promises to be really great, but just to be there and not to play. I still cannot stress my heart, lungs and ribs and it is way too early. He said, "Mike you'd better wait a while till you're well because Larry's jam is too loud and it could damage your heart". I had never heard such a thing and asked if loud music can do that to which he said that he had seen signs at some rock clubs with big amps and speakers with signs warning that loud music can be harmful for people with heart conditions.


    So I just looked it up and sure enough found a number of articles saying basically what this one says:


    Loud Noise Exposure Linked to Increased Risk for Heart
    Disease
    November11,2015
    By Dr. Mercola


    People who suffer from highÂ*frequency hearing loss in both ears have typically been chronically exposed to loud noise, such as at work.


    The National Institutes of Health even states that about 15 percent of Americans between the ages of 20 and 69 have highÂ*frequency hearing loss related to noise exposure during occupational or leisure activities.1


    While there are now government standards that regulate allowable noise exposures at work, prior to the midÂ*1960s no laws were in place to mandate the use of devices to protect hearing. Further, even with such laws in place, many people still suffer from noiseÂ*induced hearing loss.


    In fact, excessive noise exposure is the most common cause of hearing loss in the US. Noise exposure isn't only damaging to your ears, however. It's also damaging to your heart.


    LongÂ*Term Exposure to Loud Noise Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease


    People who suffer from highÂ*frequency hearing loss in both ears have typically been chronically exposed to loud noise, such as at work
    People who suffer from this type of hearing loss were twice as likely to have coronary heart disease compared to those with normal hearing
    Bilateral highÂ*frequency hearing loss among those aged 50 and under was associated with a fourÂ*fold increased risk of heart disease


    Researchers with the University of Kentucky College of Public Health in Lexington analyzed data from more than 5,200 people ranging in age from 20 to 69.
    Those who suffered from highÂ*frequency hearing loss in both ears were twice as likely to also have coronary heart disease compared to those with normal hearing.2


    The link was even stronger among those aged 50 and under, who were the age group most likely to be exposed to loud noise at work; bilateral highÂ*frequency hearing loss in this age group was associated with a fourÂ*fold increased risk of heart disease.


    Although the study can't prove that noise was directly related to heart disease, no such association was found among people with oneÂ*sided hearing loss or lowÂ*frequency hearing loss (which are less likely to be due to noise exposure).
    This further strengthens the link between noiseÂ*induced hearing loss and heart disease.3


    Noise Raises Stress Levels... A Key Risk Factor for Heart Disease
    It might seem surprising that excessive, chronic noise exposure could harm your heart, but think about it in terms of stress.


    It's estimated that 100 million people are exposed to unhealthy levels of noise, typically from automobile and aircraft traffic (although everything from leaf blowers and lawnmowers to loud music can also contribute).4


    This is stressful, and when you're exposed to loud noise stress hormones such as cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline become elevated. Over time, this can lead to high blood pressure, stroke, and heart failure.


    One review of research showed that "arousal associated with nighttime noise exposure increased blood and saliva concentrations of these hormones even during sleep."5
    Deepak Prasher, a professor of Audiology at University College in London and a member of the WHO Noise Environmental Burden of Disease working group, states:6


    "Many people become habituated to noise over time... The biological effects are imperceptible, so that even as you become accustomed to the noise, adverse physiological changes are nevertheless taking place, with potentially serious consequences to human health.
    ... Taken together, recent epidemiologic data show us that noise is a major stressor that can influence health through the endocrine, immune, and cardiovascular systems."


    The impact can be significant. Among women who judge themselves to be sensitive to noise, chronic noise exposure increased the risk of cardiovascular mortality by 80 percent!7 Chronic noise exposure also leads to health risks beyond your heart and hearing, such as diminished productivity, sleep disruption, impaired learning, and more.


    How Much Noise Is Too Much for Your Heart?


    The World Health Organization (WHO) Noise Environmental Burden of Disease working group calculated just how much noise exposure could be putting your heart at risk.
    The "noise threshold" for heart problems was determined to be a chronic nighttime exposure of at least 50 AÂ*-weighted decibels, which is the amount of noise created by light traffic.8
    And according to research published in Environmental Health Perspectives, longÂ*term exposure to traffic noise may account for approximately 3 percent of coronary heart disease deaths (or about 210,000 deaths) in Europe each year.9

    This is an important point to consider, since those exposed to chronic traffic noise also tend to be chronically exposed to another heart health risk – air pollution.
    Exposure to fine particle air pollution increased "thoracic aortic calcification" (TAC) scores, a measure of arterial hardening, by nearly 20 percent while exposure to noise pollution increased TAC by about 8 percent.10


    This was after controlling for other variables that may influence heart health, such as age, gender, smoking, physical activity, alcohol use, and more. What this means is that people living in highÂ*risk areas need to account for both types of pollution – air and noise – to protect their heart health. As researchers noted:11
    "... [B]oth exposures seem to be important and both must be considered on a population level, rather than focusing on just one hazard."

    Well, now I have to wonder if my playing and being at this jam for the past two years, usually from 11:30 to 3 a.m., sitting up close quite often as well as being on stage a lot as the only sax player there could have helped cause my recent heart attack. I only used ear plugs briefly because, as I posted, I found they blocked my hearing too much and then I lost one of them. And of course I have always had to use a paint peeler and play really loudly to carry past the wall of sound generated by the shredders and drummer.


    Even more pertinent a question is if the gig I was at the night I had the attack could have precipitated it. Two main members of the band are old friends of mine from work and they are now gigging again. We were sitting at a booth right alongside the bandstand and it was really really loud there since they went all out and rocked non-stop and Matt, my drummer friend was the loudest making Phil Collins seem like a wimp. After the show ended I chatted a bit and then left and just when I had gotten to the sidewalk I had the heart attack. Later from the hospital I joked on FB with them that they had caused it, but I was just kidding. I had no idea that it could in fact have been a contributing factor.


    Anyone have any knowledge about, experience with or comments on this. I think I need to know for when I finally can play again.


    Thanks.
    'How far y'all going?' Ruby asked us with a sigh.
    'We're going all the way 'till the wheels fall off and burn.
    Till the sun peels the paint and the seat covers fade and the water moccasin dies'.

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    Forum Contributor 2016 MrBlueNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    Interesting, I hadn't heard this before. As to whether your exposure to music was a contributing factor to your heart attack, it's probably impossible to say, as there are so many other risk factors (diet, exercise, exposure to tobacco smoke, genetic predisposition, etc.) That you were in this environment immediately prior to your heart attack is certainly suggestive, but "correlation does not equal causation."

    I will say this though, music has also been found to help relieve stress and have other beneficial health effects and it's obviously an important part of your life. As that particular jam is really loud, maybe try to find some other people to play with who are willing to play at a more reasonable volume?
    "Jazz is people playing weird s#*t on the V and then resolving to the I."

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    Well I know it seems illogical to try and connect the one as the cause of the other, it does beg the question. And ostensibly my arteriosclerosis was the actual cause of the attack and it is doubtful that plaque accumulates in arteries due to loud noise exposure. But this was someone else's gig where all of us at that table found it too loud and uncomfortably so, so who knows. It did seem uncanny that right after that sonic assault I had the attack after never having heart problems, that I knew of, in my life. So that is why it crossed my mind to question it.

    As to the Friday Jam, yeah, I think since I am good friends with the guy who is the leader of the band I'm just going to ask to only play with the people that go and are not guitar hero types as there are some much mellower players who go there and they usually ask me to play with them. There is a mix of music types so it is possible to avoid the screamers.
    'How far y'all going?' Ruby asked us with a sigh.
    'We're going all the way 'till the wheels fall off and burn.
    Till the sun peels the paint and the seat covers fade and the water moccasin dies'.

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    Sorry, only reminded me of this scene.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_gID6DpICZ8

    cheers, Mark.

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Is All View Post
    It did seem uncanny that right after that sonic assault I had the attack after never having heart problems, that I knew of, in my life. So that is why it crossed my mind to question it.
    Yeah, makes sense. It certainly does raise the question.

    I played a gig last year with a drummer who was subbing. Nice guy, very experienced, good player. We had this great chat during the opening act about Stax. Fast forward thirty minutes later, we're five tunes into our set, the music is loud, the audience is drinking and dancing, and I notice the beat is slowing down. I look over my shoulder just in time to see the drummer fall off his stool onto the stage. Paramedics rush to the scene and everyone watches in shock and horror as they try to revive him. Unfortunately, they were unable to do so. We found out later he had a history of heart disease. RIP, Joe.

    As to whether the music was a contributing factor, I couldn't say, but it's a possibility.
    "Jazz is people playing weird s#*t on the V and then resolving to the I."

    -My teacher

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    Well, I guess I'm a goner then. I play loud, I play in loud bands at loud places and I shoot loud guns (ear protection, of course and not necessarily on the gig ). But I'm way older than the subjects of those surveys, so maybe some people are not affected in that way.

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    I'm totally shocked to read this! My initial response is: Screw it......something's going to get me.....the hell with it, if it's going to be music!
    But, you can buy something along these lines, and it'll be better than doing nothing:

    http://www.wwbw.com/Fender-Musician-...FRJWDQodkbYPsQ
    Strive to be better than the day before.

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    OMG, Mr. Bluenote, that's horrible. How old was he? Because if he was young that does not sound normal.
    'How far y'all going?' Ruby asked us with a sigh.
    'We're going all the way 'till the wheels fall off and burn.
    Till the sun peels the paint and the seat covers fade and the water moccasin dies'.

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wilbur Weltklang View Post
    Sorry, only reminded me of this scene.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_gID6DpICZ8

    cheers, Mark.
    Laughing my butt off....and that hurts my chest.
    'How far y'all going?' Ruby asked us with a sigh.
    'We're going all the way 'till the wheels fall off and burn.
    Till the sun peels the paint and the seat covers fade and the water moccasin dies'.

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    Yeah, everyone was pretty devastated by the experience and the band broke up almost immediately after this, though there were also other issues, as there often are in a band.

    Joe was just 61, but was being treated for heart disease, so it was a known issue (to him, not to us.)
    "Jazz is people playing weird s#*t on the V and then resolving to the I."

    -My teacher

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    This stuff drives me wild. Without seeing the methodology how can one conclude anything from such drivel? Did they control for burrito trucks? How about genetic factors. Any heart disease in the family I wonder? I expect one could correlate chewing gum and heart disease actually. Did they control for people who were exposed to loud noise and DIDN'T have CAD? Maybe it's just vapor trails.....in the sky......from the government.
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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    Mercola is NOT a reliable source for health information.

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    Quote Originally Posted by skyboltone View Post
    This stuff drives me wild. Without seeing the methodology how can one conclude anything from such drivel? Did they control for burrito trucks? How about genetic factors. Any heart disease in the family I wonder? I expect one could correlate chewing gum and heart disease actually. Did they control for people who were exposed to loud noise and DIDN'T have CAD? Maybe it's just vapor trails.....in the sky......from the government.
    Vapor trails are private.

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    It does seem like there would be an awful lot of dead rock musicians littering the stages of the world, if there were any real issue with the volume of music being played affecting their hearts. One supposes that anything can be more of a factor, adversely affecting the health of someone already having heart disease issues. But can loud music actually be the cause?
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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    One of the times that I've been scared, truly scared, is when I crossed the path of a huge speaker cabinet. I've avoided "loud" every since.
    If you can't dazzle them with brilliance...then baffle 'em with bullsh*t.

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    I happened to be on a ship one time when the fog came up.

    I was standing about 20 feet under the fog horn when it went off for the first time.

    It knocked me down flat on the deck, no error. I thought I was having a heart attack, and I was only 15 at the time, healthy right through.

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    Loud noise surely can cause hearing loss, but just because it it bilateral, it doesn't mean that it is noise-induced. According to audiologists, noise induced hearing loss is USUALLY associated with a notch in the audiogram. Most "normal" hearing is a somewhat straight line spanning one side of a box that becomes less perpendicular and slopes to the bottom right as one ages.right as one ages and loses the upper end of the spectrum. I noticed my hearing loss when I was most active as a musician, and as it grew worse, I quit playing for several years. When the loss became REALLY noticeable, I sought out an audiologist. When it became so bad that I needed hearing aids, I asked the audiologist (this one conducting research at Duke University) if my loss was caused by my musical activities. He told me that my "slope" was more like that of jet engine mechanic. My bands weren't terribly loud.

    Even though I had quit playing for several years, the problem became worse. When my siblings began experiencing hearing loss, I knew that it was genetic.

    Anyway, if you think that you are losing your hearing, go see an otolaryngologist and get a hearing test done. They're boring and time consuming, but you'll find out what state your hearing is in. You may still be able to resume playing as I have. [Note, if you are told that you need hearing aids, PM me and I'll share some advice as a long-time hearing aid user].

    Re: Noise causing heart disease. If a condition is considered a disease, I believe that there's a correlation. I remember as a teenager attending loud rock concerts and leaving the venues feeling not-so-good. After one particularly loud concert (either King Crimson or ELP), I felt bad all day the next day. Same thing after an Edgar and Johnny Winter concert. I went to the doctor and found that my heart was out of rhythm. He attributed it to the loud music. I quit going to concerts after that. Then, when disco came in vogue, the @#%! thump thump thump really did a number on my heart. No more disco. (I can't dance anyway).

    Fast forward many years. I was in Yangzhou, PRC and was talked into going to a "nightclub". I got as far inside as the vestibule where attendants allowed people to enter as others left. The thump thump thump really did a number on me. I told my friends that I'd go across the street and listen to a local act that wasn't loud. The next day, I thought I was having a heart attack. I went to the university hospital where the doctor asked me if I had been to "The Old Brewery" the night before. Yup. It was just the short exposure to the intense noise. I had to spend the rest of the day and that night on a cot in the infirmary until my heart returned to normal sinus.

    Since returning to the States, I have problems sitting in traffic among the idiots playing their C-Rap music so loud that the fillings in my teeth fall out. When one of those jokers gets behind me, I slow down to 5 mph and pray that there'll be a break in the traffic so they'll pass me. I swear, sometimes, it's so loud I feel like I'l throw up.

    I often wonder what their audiograms look like after a few years of exposure to that thump thump thump Yo! blahblahblahblah noise.
    Last edited by Bloo Dog; 03-19-2017 at 09:48 PM. Reason: What? Huh? Say that again?
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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    I don't like it when musicians play too loud, but that's subjective...I really like to feel the thump of a loud bass...I prefer it from the stage where you are behind the mains, but I like it. I did develop some heart palpitation problems in recent years, but dropping 50 pounds and quitting smoking seemed to clear that up. There's also a lot of stress to the body playing the late nighters...getting home a 3:00-4:00 am is probably worse for you than the loud music. And then there's the whiskey...and...

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    As others have said, "correlation is not causation," and it's not difficult to think of a number of factors besides noise that could be causing disease.

    The first thing that occurred to me was that the difference was probably due to the increased numbers of smokers you would be likely find in a population of people who work jobs where they are exposed to hazardous noise levels.

    Ask yourself: who works jobs where you're exposed to deafening noise? Not rich people. And we know that in the US, being poor is associated with a long list of health problems, including heart disease.

    Only one of the studies above mentions controlling for factors like smoking, alcohol use, and exercise, and that's the one that focuses on people who live in hazardous noise areas where the ambient noise is loud enough to cause damage, even if you don't work at a noisy job or listen to loud music. Again, who lives in those areas? I think it's mostly going to be poor people who have elevated risks for many health problems.

    My opinion: I don't think loud music is a health risk, in itself. If loud music is part of a lifestyle in which you're smoking, drinking, not eating well, and not exercising much, then yes, you're probably putting yourself at risk.

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    Default Re: Did You Know That Loud Noise (including music) Raises Your Risk of Heart Disease?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fader View Post
    I don't like it when musicians play too loud, but that's subjective...I really like to feel the thump of a loud bass...I prefer it from the stage where you are behind the mains, but I like it. I did develop some heart palpitation problems in recent years, but dropping 50 pounds and quitting smoking seemed to clear that up. There's also a lot of stress to the body playing the late nighters...getting home a 3:00-4:00 am is probably worse for you than the loud music. And then there's the whiskey...and...
    Good for you on the weight loss, which is a considerable feat. I had a hard time shaving off 10 lbs. And yes you are right, all the burning the candle at both ends like I was still a twenty-something did take their toll and was stupid. My wife kept telling me I was killing myself and she turned out to be pretty close to right. No more of tat stupidity for me now.

    Quote Originally Posted by MLucky View Post
    As others have said, "correlation is not causation," and it's not difficult to think of a number of factors besides noise that could be causing disease.

    The first thing that occurred to me was that the difference was probably due to the increased numbers of smokers you would be likely find in a population of people who work jobs where they are exposed to hazardous noise levels.

    Ask yourself: who works jobs where you're exposed to deafening noise? Not rich people. And we know that in the US, being poor is associated with a long list of health problems, including heart disease.

    Only one of the studies above mentions controlling for factors like smoking, alcohol use, and exercise, and that's the one that focuses on people who live in hazardous noise areas where the ambient noise is loud enough to cause damage, even if you don't work at a noisy job or listen to loud music. Again, who lives in those areas? I think it's mostly going to be poor people who have elevated risks for many health problems.

    My opinion: I don't think loud music is a health risk, in itself. If loud music is part of a lifestyle in which you're smoking, drinking, not eating well, and not exercising much, then yes, you're probably putting yourself at risk.
    Well here in Spain, fortunately, smoking has been prohibited in bars and restaurants and other such public places for several years now. The atmosphere here used to be toxic because of the high population of smokers, but this law changed that and really cut down on them. So that is one less thing to kill you when going out at night. I also don't drink because of a liver problem, so that is also not a risk factor for me any longer.

    Anyway, today when I saw my cardiologist I asked him about this noise thing and he said that the evidence on that is scarcely conclusive of any corrolation of the two and such studies are considered flawed and not proof of such a connection. He said it would be more likely the amount of stress a person felt in that environment rather than the noise itself. Mix in smoking, drinking, drugs and sex and certainly a loud disco or bar scene could cause enough stress over time to give someone heart problems....especially the staff. So yeah, I accept your take on it and won't worry about this other than to protect my ears more and get more sleep and stop closing the bar every time I go. After all it's a jam, not a gig. Being a night owl all my life might not be good now that I'm in my 7th decade. Ya think?
    Last edited by Jazz Is All; 03-21-2017 at 10:22 AM. Reason: corrected typos and errors of syntax.
    'How far y'all going?' Ruby asked us with a sigh.
    'We're going all the way 'till the wheels fall off and burn.
    Till the sun peels the paint and the seat covers fade and the water moccasin dies'.

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