Sax on the Web Portal - Vocabulary/slang/lingo of SOTW

  • Vocabulary/slang/lingo of SOTW

    Quote Originally Posted by puddlejumper View Post
    Please excuse my ignorance, but is there a thread containing slanguage, lingo, or vocabulary of Sax on the Web or of musicians and sax players in general? A place that defines terms that a newcomer might not know? Like SBA, big bell, stencil. Rehab/repad/regulate. Noodle. Low A. et cetera. I ask because I was looking for an explanation of what a big bell horn is. Obviously it has something to do with the bell of the horn, or something related to the bell, being bigger. But specifically? If there is such a discussion I have not found it, could someone direct me to it? If there isn't one, I request we start one. Right here in this thread.
    Most or all the terms you list are not specific to this forum. Rather, they are part of the general saxophonic vocabulary. Thus, your best bet is simply to do some outside reading. You can easily find discussions of these terms elsewhere. Within SOTW, perhaps the best place to look for introductory material of this kind would be one of the forum sections for new players.
    Anyway, to get you started:
    SBA = Super Balanced Action, a name of one of Selmer's vintage sax lines.
    Big bell = A saxophone bell that is a little larger in diameter than average. Some makers believe this contributes to a richer tone.
    Stencil = A sax built by a reputable manufacturer but sold under the brand name of another company. E.g., some Vito saxes were Yanagisawa stencils.
    Rehab = To fix up a horn that needs to be fixed up.
    Repad = To replace the pads (the flat leather circles that cover the tone holes when the player presses down a key).
    Regulate = To make the necessary adjustments to key movements, pad opening heights, etc., to put a working sax into top playing condition.
    Noodle = To engage in rather aimless, gentle improvisation.
    Low A = As an adjective, it means a sax with a slightly longer tube and an extra tone hole and key, so that it can reach the A below the Bb that is normally the sax's lowest note. Low A baritone saxes are now the norm. Low A versions of the other standard saxes are rare.
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Vocabulary/slang/lingo of SOTW started by puddlejumper View original post
    Comments 12 Comments
    1. littlewailer's Avatar
      littlewailer -
      I thought you might mean forum terms like YAGE (Yet Another Grand Exit) or GAS (Gear Acquisition Syndrome) or Abbreviations like IIRC (If I recall Correctly) Or IMHO (In my Honest Opinion).

      Big Bell does indeed refer to the size of the bell but a big bell from one company might not be anywhere as big as the normal size bell offered from another. There's no real standardization.

      Maybe you could compile a list of terms and we can fill it in for you?
    1. SaxPunter's Avatar
      SaxPunter -
      Like any forum YMMV
    1. LostConn's Avatar
      LostConn -
      Quote Originally Posted by puddlejumper View Post
      [FONT=georgia]Please excuse my ignorance, but is there a thread containing slanguage, lingo, or vocabulary of Sax on the Web or of musicians and sax players in general? A place that defines terms that a newcomer might not know? Like SBA, big bell, stencil. Rehab/repad/regulate. Noodle. Low A. Et cetera. I ask because I was looking for an explanation of what a big bell horn is. Obviously it has something to do with the bell of the horn, or something related to the bell, being bigger. But specifically? If there is such a discussion I have not found it, could someone direct me to it? If there isn't one, I request we start one. Right here in this thread.
      Most or all the terms you list are not specific to this forum. Rather, they are part of the general saxophonic vocabulary. Thus, your best bet is simply to do some outside reading. You can easily find discussions of these terms elsewhere. Within SOTW, perhaps the best place to look for introductory material of this kind would be one of the forum sections for new players.

      Anyway, to get you started:
      SBA = Super Balanced Action, a name of one of Selmer's vintage sax lines.
      Big bell = A saxophone bell that is a little larger in diameter than average. Some makers believe this contributes to a richer tone.
      Stencil = A sax built by a reputable manufacturer but sold under the brand name of another company. E.g., some Vito saxes were Yanagisawa stencils.
      Rehab = To fix up a horn that needs to be fixed up.
      Repad = To replace the pads (the flat leather circles that cover the tone holes when the player presses down a key).
      Regulate = To make the necessary adjustments to key movements, pad opening heights, etc., to put a working sax into top playing condition.
      Noodle = To engage in rather aimless, gentle improvisation.
      Low A = As an adjective, it means a sax with a slightly longer tube and an extra tone hole and key, so that it can reach the A below the Bb that is normally the sax's lowest note. Low A baritone saxes are now the norm. Low A versions of the other standard saxes are rare.
    1. Rackety Sax's Avatar
      Rackety Sax -
      I don't know that there is one, but it would sure help newbies. Add "Slant" (usually a vintage "slant signature" Otto Link Tone Edge mouthpiece, I think) to the list.
    1. artstove's Avatar
      artstove -
      You can just read the forum for awhile and you pick it up pretty quickly. Or you can ask a specific, focused question, which will generally get a quick, clear answer. Like: http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthr...fset-quot-Berg
    1. Phil1's Avatar
      Phil1 -
      Quote Originally Posted by LostConn View Post
      Most or all the terms you list are not specific to this forum. Rather, they are part of the general saxophonic vocabulary. Thus, your best bet is simply to do some outside reading. You can easily find discussions of these terms elsewhere. Within SOTW, perhaps the best place to look for introductory material of this kind would be one of the forum sections for new players.

      Anyway, to get you started:
      SBA = Super Balanced Action, a name of one of Selmer's vintage sax lines.
      Actually the horn was named " Super Action " by Selmer.

      Players began calling it SBA to distinguish it from the "Balanced Action" and from the much older "Selmer Super". Hence "Super Action" was used by Selmer and SBA by players.
    1. B Flat's Avatar
      B Flat -
      Quote Originally Posted by SaxPunter View Post
      Like any forum YMMV
      Thats the one that had me stumped for months.
      IMO, IMHO, YMMV, are all terms for "this is what I think but if I'm wrong I didn't state it as a fact".
      IIRC this was JMHO and I wont stand by it or back it up should I be wrong.
      But in all honesty or IAH it is confusing for the uninitiated.
      MOTWYW.
    1. gary's Avatar
      gary -
      SUAP = shut up and practice
    1. B Flat's Avatar
      B Flat -
      BTTS= Back to the shed
    1. puddlejumper's Avatar
      puddlejumper -
      Thanks for the replys so far.

      Altissimo- The range of notes played above and beyond what the sax was designed to play using unusual and special fingerings?
    1. LostConn's Avatar
      LostConn -
      Quote Originally Posted by puddlejumper View Post
      Thanks for the replys so far.

      Altissimo- The range of notes played above and beyond what the sax was designed to play using unusual and special fingerings?
      Sort of, but I would be careful about "designed to play." There's some evidence that A. Sax himself intended a greater range than that provided by the regular keys. It's better just to say the extreme upper range of the saxophone, above the notes provided by the standard use of the palm keys.

      Note that "altissimo" as a register applies to other instruments as well, e.g., clarinet.
    1. Sneaky Pete's Avatar
      Sneaky Pete -
      One question I've had is what is meant by a "big sound?" I see this often in reference to some of my favorite players like Jug Ammons or Ike Quebec, but I'm not 100% certain what it describes.

      Phrases like "spread sound" or "centered core" are more self-explanatory.

      Maybe a "Big Sound" is something you can't describe but you know it when you hear it. Sort of like tha way a Supreme Court Justice famously described obscenity, "can't define it but know it when I see it." :-)

      Does anyone have a more precise definition of "Big Sound?" I'd love to have it clarified.

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