Method book for upright bass ? [Archive] - Sax on the Web Forum

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al9672
11-06-2008, 06:26 AM
Played electric bass for a few years then stopped, just got (just about to go and pick it up) a semi acoustic upright bass.

Can anyone recommend a method book or lesson book
until I can organise a few lessons

The Saxist
11-06-2008, 04:08 PM
If you're going to be a "proper" upright player, then the Simandl Method is it. It's like Rose for clarinet, T&G for flute, Arbans for brass. No matter how well you play, if it's not in your library, your not a "real" player.;)

magical pig
11-06-2008, 04:39 PM
Yep, Simandl is a must.

You can also check :

Rufus Reid's The Evolving Bassist (http://www.amazon.com/Evolving-Bassist-Rufus-Reid/dp/0967601509) - an all-around book that covers everything from posture to scale/chord relationship
Ray Brown's Bass Method (http://www.activemusician.com/item--HL.00695308) - great chop builder
John Golsby The Jazz Bass Book (http://books.google.com/books?id=rKvAHdroxDQC&pg=PA56&lpg=PA56&dq=pettiford+bass+book&source=bl&ots=VvJeZZV4qs&sig=Z4C-izwx71awuVBlrEXofN-P498&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=1&ct=result#PPP1,M1) - this one will take you through the history of jazz bass playing
Chuck Sher's The Improviser's Bass Method (http://www.shermusic.com/tibm.htm) - if I remember well, this one concentrates a lot on building melodic walking & solo lines.The most important thing is to get the proper fingering from the start. It will be hard to change it if you get used to doing it wrong. Rufus Reid has some great things to say about this with pictures illustrating his ideas.

Victor.

al9672
11-07-2008, 10:26 PM
Thanks guys thats great!

BentC
11-09-2008, 11:50 PM
The most important thing is to get the proper fingering from the start. It will be hard to change it if you get used to doing it wrong. Rufus Reid has some great things to say about this with pictures illustrating his ideas.

+1 Best advice ever. The upright isn’t the most intuitive of instruments, but it’s a lot easier with good technique.

In general there are two bass camps with regard to technique.

Already mentioned is the older, more conservative Simandl method which emphasizes a 'closed' hand position and more shifts. This one is perhaps easier to start with, and you don’t run the risk of hurting your hands.

The second one is the Rabbath method which emphasizes a more open hand position, using the thumb as an anchor. This one is harder, but offers a lot in terms of playing fast and difficult passages in-tune. There is a lot of quality material up on Youtube for this technique.

Many modern bassists use a mixture of both (plus whatever else works for them individually) as each technique has it's own strengths and weaknesses.