learning piano [Archive] - Sax on the Web Forum

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Billy
12-31-2007, 02:24 PM
My new years resolution is to learn the piano. I don't have time to visit a tutor for lessons. Does anyone know of a good website or book that would be appropriate for someone who already has knowledge of musical theory. I know I could sit down and work things out myself, but it would be great to have a method to follow. I know many saxophonists also play piano, so maybe you would have some insight into what I would need.

Kritavi
12-31-2007, 03:06 PM
I am getting great results working with this Jerry Coker book Keyboard for Non Keyboard players . Here is the amazon link

http://www.amazon.com/Jerry-Cokers-Jazz-Keyboard-Coker/dp/0769233236

Its a small book and very practical The first third of the book has provided me the basis that I can now comp my way through a fair amount of tunes well enough to back a soloist.
The great saxophonist Jr. Cook used this book and had his students use it too.

Al Stevens
12-31-2007, 03:10 PM
My new years resolution is to learn the piano. I don't have time to visit a tutor for lessons.
Then you probably won't learn it. You certainly won't learn it correctly.

It's like flying an airplane. You can't learn it from a book. You need an instructor.

estagro
12-31-2007, 04:17 PM
I agree with Al. There are a lot of things involved in learning the piano. I am first a piano player, then a saxophone player. Started on piano like 20 years ago. Technique in piano is very important (as in all other instruments) and you won't get correct hand position and technique from a book. Hand position, fingers to use in chords and scales, how to move your fingers one over the other in passages, what to do with the fingers you are not using are just some of the things that come to mind right away.
A method is an aid, but with the piano, I'd say get an instructor. At least if you want to learn it right. I have a friend that is learning on his own and has the worst hand technique I've ever seen. I don't think you want that for yourself.

Billy
12-31-2007, 08:47 PM
I know that getting a tutor would be better than learning by myself, but honestly it really is a matter of finding time (full time job, young family etc). Even getting the right tutor if I could find the time would be difficult. Most are just interested in teaching grades and reading music. I just want to be able to comp along to a song while adding a few fills here and there. But thanks I'll try and find somebody who can start me off on the right path, but it would still be great to have a good source that I could work from home with.

estagro
01-01-2008, 07:22 AM
I used the Michael Aaron Piano Course when I started out. I think it is pretty good, but haven't tried any others. It combines technique with melodies to keep interest. Worked for me :)

Tim Price
01-01-2008, 02:10 PM
My new years resolution is to learn the piano. I don't have time to visit a tutor for lessons. Does anyone know of a good website or book that would be appropriate for someone who already has knowledge of musical theory. I know I could sit down and work things out myself, but it would be great to have a method to follow. I know many saxophonists also play piano, so maybe you would have some insight into what I would need.

JUST DO IT...:)

Find a teacher and get started.

hgiles
01-01-2008, 03:46 PM
www.pianomagic.com

^ Check that out first. Lots of folks take online lessons from this guy.

I never took formal piano lessons, learning out of books, DVD/CD ROMS, playing sheet music, etc and I get by just fine. But, you got to really want to do it and you have to be good at finding the sounds you want to hear. It's not impossible without a teacher.

Ken
01-22-2008, 09:45 PM
My new years resolution is to learn the piano. I don't have time to visit a tutor for lessons. Does anyone know of a good website or book that would be appropriate for someone who already has knowledge of musical theory. I know I could sit down and work things out myself, but it would be great to have a method to follow. I know many saxophonists also play piano, so maybe you would have some insight into what I would need.
I'm also resolving to do this. I've used the Coker book mentioned above as well. I only got part way through but it enabled me to play ii-V-i's with a five note voicing. I have another book "Jazz Chord Voicings for Two Hands" by Jim Progris which I'm going through at the moment but feel like getting some lessons for keyboard technique.

My sax teacher suggested I go to a classical teacher who taught Sam Rivers! :)

learnjazzpiano.com may be worth checking out.

BTW, if you have proper keyboard skills, do you think it is necessary to go to a jazz teacher to learn how to comp? Or would it be sufficient to get transcriptions of pianists comping or piano parts in big band charts?

Al Stevens
01-23-2008, 12:29 AM
BTW, if you have proper keyboard skills, do you think it is necessary to go to a jazz teacher to learn how to comp? Or would it be sufficient to get transcriptions of pianists comping or piano parts in big band charts?
Most big band piano charts do not include comping notation. They typically show only the chord changes inserting notes where the arranger wants a specific voicing or line.

If you already know piano and theory, a few lessons from a jazz pianist on comping would save you a lot of time.