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Benny
05-26-2003, 05:18 AM
I have recently begun to delve into the ever increasing complicated world of recorder playing due to a show I am doing that has some recorder in it.
After discussing this wierd instrument with an old teacher I have learnt that one needs to invent differant fingerings to help control the pitch of notes at differant dynamic levels ceause, unlike the flute, you can't change the angle of the airstream when you change the amount of air.
Does anyone know of any fingering charts available?? I don't really have enough hours in the day to spend a lot of time trying to work this out entirely for myself.
I have a yamaha 302BII descant(soprano) and alto recorder.

gary
05-26-2003, 07:50 AM
Benny - I wouldn't worry about it. Learn to play the recorder with standard fingerings. Once you get proficient and really feel the need to humour some notes, you can do a little experimenting.

I don't know what's so "complicated" or "wierd" about the Recorder. Are you trying to play bebop or atonal music, or conventional Recorder music?

The Recorder was not made to be a chromatic instrument. If you are trying to play highly chromatic music, then there are some challenges, to be sure. If you are playing traditional music I'm not sure there are big problems.

Keep in mind, most instruments, especially Rennaisance and Baroque, are not only not well-tempered, but are often not really transposing instruments. Therefore, the intonation is different.

Gordon (NZ)
05-26-2003, 11:47 AM
If you really want to get carried away with this there is a host of information if you google search on: recorder fingering dynamics.

Also, http://www.wfg.woodwind.org/ might help.

RS
05-26-2003, 03:48 PM
The recorder is capable of fully chromatic playing. Check the the fingering charts on the site Gordon provided above. Alternate fingerings can get pretty complex but for probably 90% or more of the standard Renaissance and Baroque repertoire the basic fingerings are all you need.

Merlin
05-27-2003, 08:46 PM
The other thing to be aware of with recorders is the two sets of fingering: C recorders and F recorders.

Recorder players are often called upon to do octave transpositions (reading soprano parts UP on alto is the most common.)

Also, the bass recorder is written in bass clef and sounds an octave higher than it's notated. It's good to be able to read off of alto parts and tenor parts.

Bass has a few odd fingerings because of the closed keys. If you buy a tenor, make sure it has the split C/C# key. Yamaha's current plastic tenor does, and is the best sounding tenor I've played.

singlereed
05-27-2003, 09:02 PM
You are quite right to consider fingering variations for different volume on recorder. This is standard advanced technique and certainly appears in one of the tutor books we have kicking around here (somewhere!). I am not too au fait with the Yamaha model numbers, but if you have the one with a curved windway (the slot in the top of the mouthpiece is curved) then it will sound miles better.

Here are a couple of websites that may help you.

http://www.dolmetsch.com/
http://members.iinet.net.au/%7Enickl/finger.html

michaelbaird
10-03-2003, 09:55 AM
I play a tenor recorder alot. It only has about a 2 octave range. Now a tin whistle has almost a 4 octave range. I recommend buying a D tin whistle.

Jack W.
10-04-2003, 05:30 PM
The other thing to be aware of with recorders is the two sets of fingering: C recorders and F recorders.

This is another strange facet of recorders, as it is not immediately obvious to me why the original inventors/players all those centuries ago didn't handle it the way we handle saxophones -- with one fingering system, treating them all as transposing instruments. But I did get one good thing out of playing the (F-fingered) alto recorder (as though busting my chops by attempting a few of the more famous repertoire pieces in the Baroque literature wasn't good enough) -- it prepared me for the chalumeau register of the clarinet.

rrex54
11-16-2003, 03:43 PM
it is not immediately obvious to me why the original inventors/players all those centuries ago didn't handle it the way we handle saxophones -- with one fingering system, treating them all as transposing instruments.

I'm not sure if this comment is tongue-in-cheek or serious. However, at the expense of feeling foolish by responding seriously to a tongue-in-cheek comment . . .

No early (what we now generally call "simple-system") instrument was a transposing one (although one might debate the last point a mite depending on POV as does an article on one of the sites referenced above). The chamuleau and early clarinets were a case in point. The instruments were made in many different keys. If one changed keys, one changed physical instrument. Over time, additional keys were added to the basic configuration of the instrument to allow them to become fully chormatic and play in any key. (If I remember correctly, one distinguishing feature of the recorder is that it is fully chromatic as is. However, to be fully chromatic, I believe a simple-system flute needs about 4 specific keys. Pennywhistles are NOT chromatic.) Those early instruments with just a few keys still had many cross fingerings -- the fingerings that slow one down on the recorder!

Iwan Muller made great strides in improving the keywork for clarinet. And his system was improved upon by Albert -- and subsequently by Oehler to produce the key system preferred by many/most German and Austrian players. Neither Muller nor Albert eliminated cross fingerings fully. Boehm, working with flutes, developed a fully chromatic scale that was later adapted to the clarinet. This keywork eliminated the crossfingers to speed playing and allowed fully chormatic instruments capable of playing in any key. In inventing his instrument, Adolphe Sax adapted the Boehm system with its chromatic possibilities.

There is something indeed humbling about playing a recorder or other simple system instrument. As someone has observed, the penny whistle is very easy to play . . . and VERY hard to play well.

OK. History lesson over! :dazed:

Jack W.
11-17-2003, 12:47 AM
My post was serious. Thanks for the explanation. :)

hangman
08-22-2007, 04:21 AM
Has anyone played this:

http://www.tinwhistles.us/jubilee/vertical.htm