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Stacey
04-22-2005, 04:14 PM
My seven-year-old son is receiving a very nice set of used Tama Swingstar drums from his uncle (a former part-time drummer). Uncle is 1800 miles away, though, and we need to find a resource (a person, a video, a book) that will allow my son (ok, maybe me, too) to start learning good habits, not bad ones. He'll have a bass drum and pedal (obviously), a floor tom, a snare, and I think FOUR mounted toms. And a hi-hat and a 16" cymbal (both Zildjians). And a throne and a couple of sets of sticks. And a partridge in a pear tree.

Can anyone recommend a good resource, or a teacher in the Chandler, Arizona area?

My son started on piano about a year ago, and that remains the #1 priority. He's already progressed into Level D of the Alfred's Young Beginner series, and has a great teacher. But like any kid he loves percussion, so we're letting him take up the drums.

And in a few years it will be band time... with a house full of saxophones, naturally the kid wants to play FLUTE... LOL

SilverNeck20
04-22-2005, 06:27 PM
I think, no wait, I'm pretty sure your in the wrong forum for drum lessons. :D

I'm also certain you'll find a drum forum out there.

Good luck.

cleger
04-22-2005, 06:48 PM
And in a few years it will be band time... with a house full of saxophones, naturally the kid wants to play FLUTE... LOL


rebellious kids!!!

Stacey
04-22-2005, 10:09 PM
I think, no wait, I'm pretty sure your in the wrong forum for drum lessons. :D

I'm also certain you'll find a drum forum out there.

Good luck.

Let's see. I'm a sax player, and have been for 26 years. I'm a SOTW member, and have been for a few years. I'm looking to DOUBLE on another instrument, "drums". I posted this in "The SOTW Forum > Doubling > Misc. Instruments and Voice". This would seem to me to be the exact, perfect, correct area in which to post this question, since I don't know anything about specific drum fora.

Now if you were to suggest a SPECIFIC drum forum to me, then that might be seen as an extremely useful answer which would help me very much. That's kind of, um, my point.

Stacey
07-06-2005, 07:02 PM
I just wanted to share what I found. Tommy Igoe has a couple of DVDs out, and I bought the first one. It was absolutely WONDERFUL, and I highly recommend it.

The first half of the DVD is devoted to unpacking and setup. It assumes you know nothing about drums, but doesn't treat you like an idiot. In about an hour, it takes you all the way through assembling every detail of a typical beginning setup - he covers bass drum, snare, mounted toms, floor tom, pedals, high-hat cymbals, and crash/ride cymbals. After that hour, you have a solid setup to begin working with, and you UNDERSTAND that setup. Our setup differed from what was shown in the video (we have two more mounted toms and one less cymbal), but the video still showed us everything we needed to know.

The second half of the DVD is devoted to teaching some drum fundamentals. He does NOT drone on and on about "rudiments". He teaches how to hold the sticks, spends a little time talking about proper ways to strike a drum (including bass drum), talks you through a little of the commonly-used high-hat techniques, and then gets right into fun stuff. He covers three basic grooves, and shows a few variations on each one. Then he talks a little about a few common fills, again with variations. In the process, he probably covers enough to play along with 80% of the rock songs ever written.

This DVD is slanted more toward rock/pop than jazz, but frankly I think it provides an excellent start for anyone, regardless of genre. If you watch this a few times, and take the time master what's in it, you will probably be as good as many of the poseurs who consider themselves "working drummers". Not bad, for a $20 video! I got this at Amazon.com - I'm sure you can find it (and Tommy's other video) by searching for "Tommy Igoe".

Highly recommended. I plan to buy the other video as well, for about $25.

Dave Dolson
07-06-2005, 07:38 PM
Warren "Baby" Dodds, the drummer brother of clarinetist Johhny Dodds (of King Oliver's Creole Jazz Band and Louis Armstrong's Hot Five and Hot Seven, and numerous other early jazz recordings) has a CD out where he talked about the techniques of drumming used in the New Orleans' bands. The accompanying music is funky, alright (hard-core N.O. jazz musicians, which I like but others won't), but still an important part of jazz history. Any budding drummer would do well to learn about how it all started. DAVE

tophatsax
07-06-2005, 07:54 PM
Stacey,

Thanks for the info. I bought a Ludwig set for my boys (11 & 7) for Christmas last year. I'd like to get something to give them a jump start. It's my 7 year old that shows the most interest.

SilverNeck20
07-07-2005, 05:05 PM
Let's see. I'm a sax player, and have been for 26 years. I'm a SOTW member, and have been for a few years. I'm looking to DOUBLE on another instrument, "drums". I posted this in "The SOTW Forum > Doubling > Misc. Instruments and Voice". This would seem to me to be the exact, perfect, correct area in which .................

Oooops! I must have missed this one...........sorry about that, I usually go to "New Posts" and dont always check what section it was from.
Didn't mean anything by my sometimes (maybe more than sometimes) weird sence of humor............glad your getting some info to help you out.

frankbiff
07-30-2005, 01:47 AM
My nine year old son has been taking drum lessions for a little over a year now. I have been practicing on his drum set using his lessons. We have a high school senior for a teacher, he's the best in the school and will be leaving for college in the fall to major in music. We plan to have a sophomore at Eastman here in Rochester as his teacher for the next year (on drum kit) in addition to 4th grade band which will teach snare and bells.

The beginning book is usually Breeze Easy for Drums, this is for snare rudaments and reading, also using Syncopation for the Modern Drummer. For grooves on the kit we use a book by Dave Mancini, the local music stores have it here but out side the Rochester area you migh have to get it from the publisher. It covers basic Jazz, Rock/Funk and Latin. Also the teacher writes stuff out and we take stuff off records and transcribe by ear.

ilovejazzmusic22
08-02-2005, 03:46 AM
I have played drums before. A Good video for me is The Beginning Drumset by :treble: MP , there were a few books I liked to read they were

Play Drums Today
Snare drum Method
Drums 2 (says fast track on the top left corner, it's black with a drumset in the middle) don't judge the cover by the book. ;)
The books were very easily explained and made for beginners to advanced.

Drum teachers are usually found in music stores. Ask a music store near you for drum lessons. I'd tell you where mine was, but I don't have a popular music store (branches)

gluck on finding drum info.

bradshawm
10-03-2005, 08:20 PM
My son is eight, and we have started him on snare drum. He is not playing with a band or taking lessons. I played a little snare way back when and am teaching him just to get started. I want to get him a set, but my wife thinks he is too young for one. I am concerned he is going to get bored stiff with the snare all by himself. Is he old enough for a set, or should I put it off? (Actually, I want a set to play with it, but can't justify it on my own :D . It is a good thing my wife does not read this forum.)

Also, thanks Stacey for the info on the DVD's. It sounds great.

Stacey
10-03-2005, 11:02 PM
(Actually, I want a set to play with it, but can't justify it on my own :D . It is a good thing my wife does not read this forum.)

Your secret is safe here. That's the safe justification I used to get a flute a couple of months ago.

My son is seven, soon to be eight. The only problem I've noticed with him and the drum set is that he's still a little small to be able to reach everything. Still, he's becoming very long-limbed, so it won't be long before everything is very easy to reach. (When I want to think of him as having lots of potential as a drummer, I describe his build as "very much like Stewart Copeland, LOL.)

LoLa
10-04-2005, 12:00 AM
ummh umh ummh...and another one bites the dust

percussion is not all about hyperactivity

it's about musicality

just because your kid pounds doesn't mean they are the next Buddy Rich

when I say my nightly prayers (and I do) I thank the Big Man for sending me saxists rather than drummers
yes, LP bongos live here, and part of a Pearl drum set
but, get real
as a parent, it is your responsibility to determine whether you have a child with ADHD or $$$$$$ potential

bradshawm
10-04-2005, 03:52 PM
Lola - ??????

Thanks Stacey. I came across an evening basic drumset class last night through our local Parks and Rec that I signed up for, with my wifes permission even. Eight one hour sessions for $60 - and they provide the drumsets. Can't "beat" that :) . The age span is 9 - adult, so my son is not old enough, but I figure I can pass some stuff on to him. I have five kids, and the older four play the piano, a wind instrument and a string instrument. My wife and I both play instruments also, so we have had a lot of fun together. Our youngest is the first to show any interest in the drums, and chose it over a wind instrument, which will be a great addition once he gains a little proficiency. He has shown an extremely good sense of rythm, so I think he will do well. I am actually looking at getting an electronic drum set instead of accoustic. That way I can adjust it to be smaller for him, and my wife and I can use it for laying down midi instead of her keyboard. That is one of the joys of having kids - you can live vicariously through your kids with instruments you don't have time to learn to play!

Stacey
10-04-2005, 04:12 PM
bradshawm -

That's very cool, and sounds like a great deal on the class. I don't blame you - I would sign up for that in a heartbeat, if it were available to me.

Heh - my post above led me to dust off my box set of "The Police" CDs, and give them a listen. Stewart, Sting, and Andy really had something. And Stewart's drumming still blows me away as much as ever - the man must have a couple of extra arms or something. He plays drums the way I would want to play them, if I had the skill. Lots of punctuation and accents, without all the dull thumping you so often hear.

Good luck to you and your kid, and remember - as long as it's a joyful noise, it's music! (Even if it occasionally hard to tolerate.)

LoLa
10-05-2005, 01:21 AM
I am not sure what ??????? means
there are hyperactive children who enjoy pounding, and there are musical children who percuss

if you and yours enjoy and express, I guess that is the important thing

frankbiff
11-02-2005, 12:17 AM
Check this site out, lots of video and mp3's, many featuring sax players too!!! (playing with the drumers.

http://www.drummerworld.com/index.html