what's as far away from sax as possible? [Archive] - Sax on the Web Forum

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jaysne
01-01-2014, 04:53 AM
I double on all the reeds and brass, and play some percussion.

I was trying to think of what instrument would present the biggest challenge to a horn player (brass or woodwind). That is, an instrument that has a completely different logic to it.

Obviously, the snare drum comes to mind. What good snare drummers do is completely a new universe and has nothing whatsoever to do with how a horn player thinks about his instrument.

Some might say piano. But piano uses the same scales and fingering logic--you go up, you go down.

But what about other instruments? Three that come to mind for me are accordion, harp, and bagpipes.

Does anyone play these three instruments? Can you fill us in on how they are played and if there is any kind of comparison to what a sax player knows how to do?

artstove
01-01-2014, 04:59 AM
I would think violin/cello etc. No keys, no wind, etc.

Joeywhat
01-01-2014, 05:05 AM
I think drum sets pose the biggest challenge for most monophonic instrumentalists. I know I just CAN'T play drums with all four limbs doing different rhythms. Hell, I have a hard enough time doing it with piano...

Bagpipes are also certainly a different approach. I had a friend play one in high school, I don't think it's THAT hard. Getting the whole "breath into the bag then press that to make noise" make take a little while, but fingerings are similar to saxophone in that more holes closed = lower notes. He also played bassoon, and talk about a plethora of keys...I think that is at least in the running for most difficult...not only are there a ton of keys and weird fingerings, but it's also hard to get the embouchure right.

Are we keeping this to western, mainstream instruments? I'm sure there's plenty of Eastern style instruments designed to play with different tunings and scales that have all sorts of weird (to us) methods of making music.

jaysz
01-01-2014, 05:28 AM
I would personally think any stringed instrument, particularly if you want to play like steel string guitar or bass, working on bass now and the fingers really need to stretch.

Koen Devisschere
01-01-2014, 06:17 AM
+1 for bass

Joeywhat
01-01-2014, 07:06 AM
I might put guitar in there...but I find bass to be pretty easy to play. I can do alright at basic stuff (with no proper instruction/lessons), and since I tend to visualize intervals it's not too hard to figure stuff out by just looking at the frets and knowing what each string is.

I do have a hard time with guitar, just due to having to know all the chord positions.

B Flat
01-01-2014, 07:19 AM
xylophone

TurtleJimmy
01-01-2014, 01:36 PM
Oud.


Turtle

tinpalaceroach
01-01-2014, 01:45 PM
I recently saw on a You Tube video a sax player double on what looked like either a gazelle or Impala long horn with a sax mouthpiece on the small end and he sounded good too! sheesh!!

dvdberg
01-01-2014, 02:40 PM
How about singing? Controlling that voice box can be a lifelong challenge!

Swaman
01-01-2014, 03:14 PM
Tromba Marina

captjraney
01-02-2014, 12:09 PM
I played the Bagpipes for awhile. My wife and dogs made me give them up.

jlima
01-02-2014, 02:00 PM
My wife and dogs made me give them up.

Which of them howled the loudest?

almico
01-02-2014, 02:14 PM
I vote for guitar. Especially when you get past chords and licks and get into what 6 strings and a fingerboard can really do:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UN5U6ppHpgw

This is really a great video and one of the reasons I gave up guitar! It starts off slow, but really starts to cook around 1:30ish when he's playing a bass line, rhythm chords and melody simultaneously. Give me a sax any day.

And to add insult to injury, he's playing this on a $400 Dearmond X-155 guitar. Who needs a Gibson, Guild or Martin?

Desgranges
01-02-2014, 02:23 PM
Guitar, ha. Try a fretless 12 string bass guitar.

hPwMoiKaNOY

You will never look down on your sax intonation ever again. :bluewink:

Metalflake
01-02-2014, 02:35 PM
Theramin?

almico
01-02-2014, 02:39 PM
Glass Armonica?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQemvyyJ--g

rzzzzz
01-02-2014, 02:53 PM
almico: Glass Armonica?

i dig that Mozart wrote music for Ben Franklin's musical invention, but doesn't playing it cause nerve damage in the fingertips (or was that just the high lead content in the glass a couple hundred years ago)? anyway, i'm glad g-force has that sampled in their mellotron plug.

i vote synth, particularly something as unconventional as an Arp Odyssey, which offers a broad palette of sounds, but coaxing them out requires a whole different kind of mentality.

almico
01-02-2014, 03:00 PM
i dig that Mozart wrote music for Ben Franklin's musical invention, but doesn't playing it cause nerve damage in the fingertips (or was that just the high lead content in the glass a couple hundred years ago)? anyway, i'm glad g-force has that sampled in their mellotron plug.

I think it was just listening to it that supposedly caused problems. Something about the timbre range and the ear/brain's inability to triangulate the direction of where the sound was coming from was disturbing to some. Hearing it live, the sound appeared to be coming from inside your head.

aaronrod
01-02-2014, 09:55 PM
I would still say piano - with woodwinds and brass, it's all about getting the note to sound right. However on piano, the note is set for you so it's all about rhythm and harmony, at a level that goes far beyond what single note instruments have to think about.

However if you're against learning piano, then I would vote for a fretless stringed instrument like violin, viola or cello (or bass, if you have the spare cash).

Pete Thomas
01-02-2014, 10:10 PM
A soprano?

Turnaround
01-02-2014, 10:32 PM
i double on all the reeds and brass, and play some percussion.

I was trying to think of what instrument would present the biggest challenge to a horn player (brass or woodwind). That is, an instrument that has a completely different logic to it.

Obviously, the snare drum comes to mind. What good snare drummers do is completely a new universe and has nothing whatsoever to do with how a horn player thinks about his instrument.

Some might say piano. But piano uses the same scales and fingering logic--you go up, you go down.

But what about other instruments? Three that come to mind for me are accordion, harp, and bagpipes.

Does anyone play these three instruments? Can you fill us in on how they are played and if there is any kind of comparison to what a sax player knows how to do?

a daw.

50979

jaysne
01-02-2014, 11:47 PM
He also played bassoon, and talk about a plethora of keys...I think that is at least in the running for most difficult...not only are there a ton of keys and weird fingerings, but it's also hard to get the embouchure right.


I play bassoon, and I find it actually on the easy side. Sure there are some strange fingerings, but you learn them and they're fine. Like the upper register of the flute. I never had any problem with the embouchure, either. It's so loose, it's easy.

tinpalaceroach
01-03-2014, 12:14 AM
Musical saw, Rahsaan Roland Kirk on three saxes, a jawbone of an A@s, harmonica, spoons, yodeling.

Ken
01-03-2014, 12:21 AM
As a kid I took some violin lessons, and practiced guitar a bit. Recently I tried taking up drums and piano on the side. I would say either drums or piano. Drums is hard from the 4 limbs point of view, but piano is hard from the combination of all the things you can do on it. Comping, harmonizing the melody with the right hand, bass lines, counterpoint, all the different kinds of voicings, sight reading multiple notes on the bass and treble clef, classical vs jazz etc.

bamajazzlady
02-14-2014, 03:42 PM
Try trumpet, three valves is why I'm sticking with it.

OboeGuy
02-15-2014, 04:20 AM
As a WW doubler that plays and teachers strings, I'd say a string instrument, or even go further and try harp.

Organ could be a good one as well, gets all your limbs moving and playing.

marton
02-15-2014, 05:56 AM
violin

I know because I try to play both sax and it. It's like Venus and Mars.

MrBlueNote
02-15-2014, 06:35 AM
+1 for drums.

Sidepipes
02-15-2014, 05:01 PM
Accordion!

milachica
02-15-2014, 07:40 PM
What's as far away from any instrument as possible? :mrgreen:
http://youtu.be/PSYwDoT_szc

AdamAugust
02-15-2014, 11:41 PM
Played accordion before I ever took up sax, and I've always loved cello. No conflicts there. The harmonica, however, has always frustrated me.

IBeOmega
02-16-2014, 01:59 AM
Farthest from sax? First thing that popped into my mind was the theremin, and the tuned Tesla coils quickly followed, succeeded at last by...
THE PYROPHONE.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iuCJxqyATT0

BH9
04-10-2014, 01:27 PM
Doublebass. Different roles in music, crazy difficult to play, physically, and will make you REALLY think about intonation.

djm0226
04-10-2014, 01:53 PM
Hammered Dulcimer

sowilson
04-10-2014, 02:01 PM
try the uilleann pipes with a full set of regulators. You've got to handle bellows, a bag, a chanter that can play open or closed, drones, and regulators where you play harmony with your wrist.

Bassy
04-10-2014, 02:13 PM
I Have played oboe, guitar, bass, and harmonica for over 40 years. In the last 3 years I have picked up tenor and alto sax, as well as mandolin. I recently started classical guitar lessons...what a totally different experience! I wish I had started with this 40 years ago, but as a kid playing in a rock band, I guess that won't have been cool. Classical guitar taught from a true classical perspective takes one in so many different directions, counterpoint rhythms, melodies and harmonies moving in all different directions all over the fretboard all at the same time, nuances of finger picking, fretting, and percussive movements, etc., etc.,etc. Even with 40 years of guitar and bass experience this has been challenging, yet immensely rewarding.

Just another thought.:)

notes_norton
04-10-2014, 02:20 PM
I didn't read all the posts (early gig today) but I offer guitar.

It's easy to read music on the sax, it's challenging on the guitar.

It's easy to sustain on the sax, challenging on the guitar

It's difficult to transpose on the sax, easy on the guitar

The sax has one tone, with the pickups, knobs, amp and FX loops, the guitar has many

You use your air to make noise on the sax, you use your fingers or pick to pluck the guitar

You play single notes on the sax, you play double, triple notes or chords on the guitar

I play both, and each one has a very different kind of delight - plus they are both commercial and easy to get gigs with (unlike viola for a severe example).

Insights and incites by Notes

1953SBAALTO
04-10-2014, 02:25 PM
Sitar or Theramin

The Saxist
04-10-2014, 04:50 PM
New Jersey.

RookTenor
04-10-2014, 04:56 PM
"Petunia", my double bass, is as far from my Vito alto as I care to venture.

BuescherBob
04-10-2014, 05:42 PM
New Jersey.

What have I done to deserve such disrespect?

Expect a visit from my sax teacher, Luca Brasi.

hnehne
04-10-2014, 06:06 PM
I have to agree with those suggesting the organ. With drums you have to keep up to four rhythms going, on the organ you can have three or four melodies with additional harmonies going in parallel. Listen carefully to Bach BWV578 "Little Fugue in G minor", there's always only one person playing.

Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk

crsbryan
11-09-2014, 01:30 AM
Having ventured into the world of the Great Highland Bagpipe... It's definitely a departure.
Once I got past the craziness of running three single reeds and a double reed, it got a bit easier.
The approach to playing is totally different, though.

But... I am handling it just fine.

I still can't rap my head around string instruments. I try, but i have trouble putting it all together.

Jazz Is All
11-09-2014, 02:05 AM
The guitar is pretty far away since there is no actual diatonic scale either in the tuning of the strings or going down the fret board. The notes of any scale are all over the place on the fretboard. Too crazy for me to want to try.

The musical saw is pretty strange too.

The button accordion looks to be really outrageously difficult. It doesn't have a piano keyboard, but all these buttons in weird patterns. I can't even imagine how you find the notes in all that mess, while having to squeeze it in and out at the same time.

60585

datsaxman
11-09-2014, 02:25 AM
Bass notes on the accordion are arranged according to circle of fifths on the second left hand column...first column is half a step chromatic away from the second column...other columns add the notes to finish major, miner, seventh, dim chords.

I played with piano keyboard on the RH, so NO THANKS to mo' buttons.

Accordion is infinitely easier than drums...

MartinMusicMan
11-09-2014, 05:16 AM
I've played many different kinds of instruments. It's sort of a lifelong hobby. I love getting to try playing on an instrument that I've never played before. I had a gas at a recent jam playing the standup string bass for the first time.

I agree with the OP that drums are far away from sax. I've tried to play a drum kit before and learned a few patterns but coordinating 2 hands and 2 feet while keeping good time is beyond my abilities.

And even though I play keyboard in bands, playing it WELL is a whole 'nother thing. I don't really have much independence of hands to play one thing in the left and another in the right. But the organ players I really admire are the ones that can play the bass pedals with a foot while playing 2 manuals with their hands.

I tried a button concertina many years ago but couldn't grok the button pattern.

I could get to first base on lots of instruments. I can play some blues licks on harmonica. Then I got a chromatic harmonica a while ago. I tried to learn it while walking my dog, keeping it with me in the car, and so forth, but ultimately it defeated me. I admire Stevie Wonder who seemed to take to the chromatic harmonica as a young boy as if it was made for him. I suppose if I played it every day for a year, I might start to get the hang of it but it frustrated me so much I just gave up.

MartinMusicMan
11-09-2014, 05:24 AM
2 other instruments that I never understood how to play are pedal steel guitar and harp.

Jazz Is All
11-09-2014, 08:31 AM
I tried the kazoo, but couldn't get the hang of it. That's why I was never attracted to the trombone.

Nearly cracked a tooth on that damn twanging metal jaw harp....twang your magic twanger Froggie---it's like plucking a Kalimba in your mouth sorta kinda.

Never tried the nose flute because I had sinus problems that made that impossible. Plus it would have gotten plugged up with snot before I had gotten to the bridge, and I would have fallen off into the river.

Years ago one of my roommates was a drummer. His kit was in the dining room of the house we rented. I tried playing it a number of times but like MMM, even though I have good rhythm sense the moment I tried to play the high hat along with the snare it all went to hell. Never mind adding the bass drum. My roommate tried to teach me a Paradiddle but for me it was more like a pair-o-doofus, with the pair being the left and right sides of my body.

The drums is like being Siamese twins having a snit fit while walking down the street so each goes in the opposite direction.

As to the piano, I figure it's just best to play it like a sax...you know, first the left hand does something and then the right hand does something.....because no way can I comp chords and play the melody or a solo simultaneously.

Ballad state of mind
11-09-2014, 10:07 AM
I played the Bagpipes for awhile. My wife and dogs made me give them up.

That's why you mostly see a piper walking when playing. Because a moving target is harder to hit. LoL.

Jazz Is All
11-09-2014, 01:47 PM
That's why you mostly see a piper walking when playing. Because a moving target is harder to hit. LoL.
Best just to have a long stick to lift his.kilt up with and poke him with it in his dangling parts. [emoji48] [emoji38] [emoji122]

crsbryan
11-09-2014, 01:53 PM
That's why you mostly see a piper walking when playing. Because a moving target is harder to hit. LoL.

That, and we're trying to escape the sound.

Swaman
11-09-2014, 03:07 PM
Here it is: http://www.trombamarina.com/instruments/tromba-marina/

littlewailer
11-09-2014, 03:09 PM
Theramin

twowheels
11-09-2014, 03:11 PM
How about singing? Controlling that voice box can be a lifelong challenge!

+1

Carl H.
11-09-2014, 04:17 PM
Violin
The bow is an entirely different skill to master from any other instrument.
One violin may play as many notes in the first half of a concert as other complete sections do for the entire concert.
Counting 4+ ledger lines is par for the course.
Playing horizontally and vertically are both expected.
Learning to play pianissimo while breathing is a challenge unlike any other instrument, breathing at any dynamic is a learned skill different from a wind instrument.
Put down any finger and you can get whatever note you want if you are good, if you aren't you will never be able to predict what sound will come forth.
Trade in your pristine 5 digit MK VI tenor and get a good violin bow, Violin??? HWA hahahahahahahahaha
You need to be able to play in strict unison with a dozen other people playing your exact part.
Playing loud requires more finesse than sawing harder, hitting harder, blowing harder or turning up a knob.



strings and drums are related as physical motion is needed to produce rhythm, but drums are mostly fixed pitch - I played timpani for years so yeah...
Guitars have frets, 12th fret on string 1 always gives you the same note, 3rd finger in 5th position could be almost anything depending on the players skill.
Other than trombone, you push the button you get the note.(yeah yeah, partials...)
Bass rarely has active parts, repetition is the norm. Almost a percussion instrument more than a lead most of the time. I've been gigging bass for the last decade, it's different from sax, but not as far away as violin.

MartinMusicMan
11-09-2014, 05:34 PM
Also a valve instrument works on a different principle that keys on a sax. My brother played trumpet so I got the basic idea of playing the overtones with your embouchure together with the various combinations of 3 valves but I could never put it all together to make sense. Seems like you have to start with the very basics and gradually learn to play all the notes over the range of the instrument. It would take a lot of practice to be able to improvise.

Jazz Is All
11-09-2014, 07:10 PM
Violin
The bow is an entirely different skill to master from any other instrument.
One violin may play as many notes in the first half of a concert as other complete sections do for the entire concert.
Counting 4+ ledger lines is par for the course.
Playing horizontally and vertically are both expected.
Learning to play pianissimo while breathing is a challenge unlike any other instrument, breathing at any dynamic is a learned skill different from a wind instrument.
Put down any finger and you can get whatever note you want if you are good, if you aren't you will never be able to predict what sound will come forth.
Trade in your pristine 5 digit MK VI tenor and get a good violin bow, Violin??? HWA hahahahahahahahaha
You need to be able to play in strict unison with a dozen other people playing your exact part.
Playing loud requires more finesse than sawing harder, hitting harder, blowing harder or turning up a knob.



strings and drums are related as physical motion is needed to produce rhythm, but drums are mostly fixed pitch - I played timpani for years so yeah...
Guitars have frets, 12th fret on string 1 always gives you the same note, 3rd finger in 5th position could be almost anything depending on the players skill.
Other than trombone, you push the button you get the note.(yeah yeah, partials...)
Bass rarely has active parts, repetition is the norm. Almost a percussion instrument more than a lead most of the time. I've been gigging bass for the last decade, it's different from sax, but not as far away as violin.
My head hurts after reading that. Too bad they don't have Violin Hero so everyone could play one at the level of a normal human being.

Chili Pepper
11-09-2014, 07:28 PM
Violin is a bit further than slide trombone, but not much more, as far as pitch is concerned. Provided you have a good ear and relative pitch (or perfect pitch but I wouldn't cast that on my worst enemy), violin is not that hard to play in tune. The hardest part on violin is getting a good sound, hence mastering the bow. Fingers tend to remember the positions as well as the arm for a trombonist. I've played the violin, I can blow a trombone... not a big deal playing in tune, if you have good ears (but if you don't, oh my...). For that matter, saxophone may well be much harder as you're led to think you play in tune by pressing the right buttons. Getting a good tone is the hardest part on most instruments.

Hall Monitor
11-09-2014, 08:55 PM
Bandoneon.

Jazz Is All
11-09-2014, 09:17 PM
This one is very different and much more difficult to play.


60604

Lambros
07-15-2017, 01:58 PM
I agree with guitar especially since it is so accessible and comes in many forms to suit a very wide style range. You can find an Ace Frehley video showing you how to play 'Shock Me' and then something like this great video (nice post Alnico!) BTW a Dearmond X-155 is a very nice guitar albeit being the entry level Guild that it is. I owned one and wished I kept it, immaculately made and a bargain.


I vote for guitar. Especially when you get past chords and licks and get into what 6 strings and a fingerboard can really do:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UN5U6ppHpgw

This is really a great video and one of the reasons I gave up guitar! It starts off slow, but really starts to cook around 1:30ish when he's playing a bass line, rhythm chords and melody simultaneously. Give me a sax any day.

And to add insult to injury, he's playing this on a $400 Dearmond X-155 guitar. Who needs a Gibson, Guild or Martin?

jthole
07-15-2017, 03:34 PM
Harp.

CaneMutiny
09-03-2017, 12:59 AM
Caucasians with rhythm in Texas.... progress!!!
https://youtu.be/_fKntnlIYTQ

Jazz Is All
09-03-2017, 05:01 PM
The spoons.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nLmM9kcBKs

Mike T
09-04-2017, 02:56 PM
Try the lagerphone…

131098 131106

Jazz Is All
09-04-2017, 04:00 PM
I prefer the Lagersteinphone.....

131114

Randal
10-02-2017, 02:31 AM
... Three that come to mind for me are accordion, harp, and bagpipes.

Does anyone play these three instruments? Can you fill us in on how they are played and if there is any kind of comparison to what a sax player knows how to do?

I play many - accordians and harp (wire strung clarsach, aka "Irish" harp) being two of my primaries.

I don't know that anything particularly inherent to these are antithetical to sax any more than other non-winds. The given instrument families are all highly disparate.

Mike T
10-02-2017, 06:39 AM
The Lambeg drum.

137770

frozen fingers
12-24-2017, 04:51 PM
try the uilleann pipes with a full set of regulators. You've got to handle bellows, a bag, a chanter that can play open or closed, drones, and regulators where you play harmony with your wrist.

Yup, the only instrument with a built in airbag and seat belt. I have a couple of full sets, they're lovely if you can keep on top of the reeds.

ZootTheSim
12-24-2017, 05:48 PM
My audiences. They usually move as close to the exit door as possible, and sometimes go right through it.

ToomanyTenors
12-24-2017, 08:01 PM
+1 to violin and classical organ

My dad was a professional orchestral violinist, practiced every day, sounded great, looked smooth and easy - oh yeah! I asked to have a violin lesson or two when I was 12 while I was learning clarinet, but one session was enough. Sudden realisation of how high the mountain was I'd have to climb, how much study, practice, dedication, muscle memory to develop - yes I was a reed-playing snowflake even pre-teen! Similarly, I now have a pal who was a University organ scholar and plays church music and organ concerts all the time. I've watched him play - the sheer mental and physical concentration and co-ordination required is staggering (take Widor's Toccata and Fugue for example!). Sax is a walk in the park in comparison...

Funny thing is, neither my dad nor my organist chum think/thought there was anything special about what they did - just part of themselves learned from a very early age - but equally neither of them could/can improvise at all, a totally alien concept to them, not even a 12-bar.

MartinMusicMan
12-24-2017, 09:32 PM
- but equally neither of them could/can improvise at all, a totally alien concept to them, not even a 12-bar.It's off the thread topic but I always find this interesting. I've known some pro classical players who can't improvise, although some of the greatest classical composers were known as very talented improvisers (Bach, for instance). And some of the most limited blues players could improvise all night in very inspiring ways. Technically perfect playing of written music and improvising are independent skills.

Jazz Is All
12-25-2017, 09:06 AM
It's off the thread topic but I always find this interesting. I've known some pro classical players who can't improvise, although some of the greatest classical composers were known as very talented improvisers (Bach, for instance). And some of the most limited blues players could improvise all night in very inspiring ways. Technically perfect playing of written music and improvising are independent skills.

Since September I've been playing with a Russian woman pianist who is a graduate of the Moscow Conservatory. We met at a blues rock jam and really liked each other's playing and decided to play together more. She not only plays classical music really beautifully, but can play jazz standards, the American Songbook and the blues as well. She even improvises boogie woogie. The first time she came to my place so we could practice together I was getting my stuff ready when I heard some Rachmaninof coming from the living room. I figured she had put on a CD, but no, it was her playing it on my non-professional Casio keyboard and sounding incredible. That's when I got scared, because she's a true professional concert pianist ..... she plays concerts in Germany and Russia throughout the year.....and I'm definitely not. On top of it she has perfect pitch and my ear is like a sow's ear that's is never gonna be even a plastic purse let alone a silk one.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ZzSURhg3OQ


BTW, the other thing that scares me is that this Sonata is almost 30 minutes long yet she is not reading it, but playing it totally from memory. Back last month she was preparing for a series of concerts in Munich and told me that the piece they had asked her to play, which she had never played before, was something like 45 pages of really complex music. Hell, I can't remember my own name let alone one page of sheet music. Fortunately she loves the way I improvise which is the only thing I have going for me in comparison to her.

Tom West
03-17-2018, 08:23 PM
I would say a musical saw is pretty far removed from just about “traditional” or standard musical instrument. Or a Sax o phone for that matter.

DarrellMass
03-18-2018, 08:42 AM
I vote for guitar. Especially when you get past chords and licks and get into what 6 strings and a fingerboard can really do:

This is really a great video and one of the reasons I gave up guitar! It starts off slow, but really starts to cook around 1:30ish when he's playing a bass line, rhythm chords and melody simultaneously. Give me a sax any day.

And to add insult to injury, he's playing this on a $400 Dearmond X-155 guitar. Who needs a Gibson, Guild or Martin?

I hate to tell you, but the DeArmond guitar featured in your video clip is a Guild.

hamilton
03-18-2018, 02:09 PM
How about a 9mm ? https://youtu.be/NNFlAzVhSVw

Bird Lives
04-11-2018, 02:31 AM
+1 for bass

Yes. Electric or acoustic. It's a completely different role in an ensemble. More rhythm-based. More rooted in the harmony (no pun intended). More repetition. Less melody. Plus you spend a lot more time playing on the bandstand instead of standing around while other people play.

Drum set would be good, too.

Jazz Is All
04-11-2018, 02:48 AM
But you have to develop a poker face and stand perfectly still to play bass and I'm not sure most sax players can do that.

wagtenor
04-11-2018, 03:41 AM
The tambourine.

Jazz Is All
04-11-2018, 08:41 AM
The saw.....handsaw or chainsaw as you prefer. The handsaw is played by running a violin bow across it whereas the chainsaw is played by running the arms and legs of a violinist across it.

Christian1
04-11-2018, 11:00 AM
Astronomy is pretty far from saxophone.

Roundmidnite
04-11-2018, 11:27 AM
Astronomy is pretty far from saxophone.

Plato and Pythagoras would disagree- according to the quadrivium's four disciplines. The first is arithmetic, concerned with the infinite linear array of numbers. Moving beyond the line to higher-dimensional spaces, we have geometry. The third discipline is music or harmony, which is, fundamentally, an application of the pure science of numbers evolving in time. Fourth comes astronomy, the application of geometry to the world of space.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/science/quadrivium-the-noble-fourfold-way-to-an-understanding-of-the-universe-1.3153793

Sacks Of Phones
04-11-2018, 12:25 PM
What a silly question.