P Mauriat
Antigua Winds
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Reface a Yani HR 5?

  1. #1
    Forum Contributor 2014
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    466

    Default Reface a Yani HR 5?

    I bought a new Yani T992 last winter (love it) and it came with their #5 hard rubber mouthpiece. I play a Berg HR 105 with 2.5 reeds, and find the tip width on the Yani too small for what I'm used to. Here's my question(s):

    --Should I look into to having the tip widened on the Yani to something similar to the Berg's, to use as a backup piece? If so, whom should I contact?

    --Should I try to sell the Yani (it's virtually unplayed), and use the money to buy a mouthpiece for the S990 that I have coming? I'm not sure how much this piece would bring; they're about $150 at WW/BW.

    --Should I just hold onto it and wait for it to become a valuable mint vintage piece (I probably won't live that long--I'm 57 )?

    Thanks for any thoughts on this.

  2. #2
    Distinguished Mouthpiece Designer/Maker/Forum Contributor 2012 Phil Barone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    4,986

    Default Re: Reface a Yani HR 5?

    I find your question confusing. Are you talking about the facing or the top of the outhpiece where your teeth rest? I think the term "widened" is what's throwing me off but I think I'm beginning to understand you now. You want the tip opening more open.

    Now I'm thrown off because I thought you wanted a backup for the because I thought you wanted a backup for the the T992. The Yani mouthpiece will never be considered a vintage piece. I believe they're made by Bari Associates and they're nothing special to begin with. They try to make them like a Meyer but you're still better off with a Meyer. The blank is made in Geermany and Bari finishes them off. Very few people make their own pieces from scratch. I can reface anything you'd like though. If you call me we'll determine if it's something you'd like when we're done. I don't let myy customers spend money unnecessarily. Phil

  3. #3

    Default Re: Reface a Yani HR 5?

    Do you like the sound of the Yani? If you don't there's really no point in opening it up.
    Stop bombarding me with your facts and sciences!

  4. #4
    Distinguished Mouthpiece Designer/Maker/Forum Contributor 2012 Phil Barone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    4,986

    Default Re: Reface a Yani HR 5?

    Actually facings and tip openings are primarily a function of feel, not sound. You can alter the sound a little through facing but it's a feel thing mostly. A more open facing is generally darker and a more closed facing is brighter. This doesn't mean that a Dukoff D6 is darker than a Link 8 because of the huge difference in chambers but a Dukoff D8 will be a little darker than a Dukoff 5 or 6.

    Anyway, you may not want the same facing on two mouthpieces with different chambers because if one chamber is smaller it will be a little easier to play so a discussion is in order with whoever is doing the work. Then again you can always adjust accordingly up or down with reeds. Phil

  5. #5
    Forum Contributor 2014
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    466

    Default Re: Reface a Yani HR 5?

    Thanks to both replies.

    I kind of like the sound of the Yani, and yes, it's the tip I'd like widened.

    Phi: I'll give you a call.

  6. #6
    JonF992's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    218

    Default Re: Reface a Yani HR 5?

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Barone View Post
    I believe they're made by Bari Associates and they're nothing special to begin with. They try to make them like a Meyer but you're still better off with a Meyer. The blank is made in Geermany and Bari finishes them off.
    I don't know where Phil got his information from on this. I've seen photos, a short film and know two people who've visited the Yanagisawa factory, and all show/tell of Yanagisawa mouthpieces being made by Yanagisawa, in the same factory where they make their saxes. They've been making mouthpieces there since December 1972.

    Still unlikely to be considered classic, as the inflationary prices in 'classic' mouthpieces is largely driven by the large American market, and my impression is that this market won't consider a Japanese product classic.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •