Antigua Winds
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  1. #1
    Distinguished SOTW Member G-dawg's Avatar
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    Default Japanese All-Girl Jazz Band


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    Forum Contributor 2007 jacobeid's Avatar
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    Seen them on there before. They're pretty good, gotta hand it to them.
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  3. #3
    The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum Contributor 2014 gary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacobeid
    They're pretty good, gotta hand it to them.
    I could do that!

    (Those kids are sick. Thanks for the link!)
    Last edited by gary; 02-10-2007 at 02:49 AM.
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    Distinguished SOTW Member goodsax's Avatar
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    Very crisp brass section, well disciplined with excellent dynamics. It's impressive how they memorized long passages of their tunes, especially demonstrated in the 'bone feature where the entire tune was played by the 'bone section in front of the band from memory. I watched and listened to about six of their performances and liked the blend they got from their ensemble, an effective balance of all instruments.
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    My 4 year old daughter thought the video was interesting. It surprised her that girls could play saxophone. Where do kids get these kinds of ideas. It's not coming from me.

    We also watched a YouTube video of Joe Lovano - her response -

    "Papa, He's not playing very good."

    I had to laugh - I would of said the same thing at even at 13 years old.

    Oh well she's only 4 - I've got a few years to get her up to speed.

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    Thanks Mark. How good was the drummer!!
    Dave


    As Billie Holiday put it, "Lester sings in his horn; you listen to him and can almost hear the words"

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    Distinguished Member and Forum Contributor 2008 saxmanglen's Avatar
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    I got side tracked listening to their stuff for a while. Thanks for sharing!

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    Distinguished SOTW Member G-dawg's Avatar
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    It is crazy how good the young musicians are in Japan. I've got a DVD of one of their national band competitions. Middle school students playing the heck out of James Barnes Chance's Korean Folk Song (is that what it is called...???) - MEMORIZED!!!! My jaw hit the floor.

    Unbelievable!

  9. #9
    The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum Contributor 2014 gary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-dawg
    It is crazy how good the young musicians are in Japan. I've got a DVD of one of their national band competitions. Middle school students playing the heck out of James Barnes Chance's Korean Folk Song (is that what it is called...???) - MEMORIZED!!!! My jaw hit the floor.Unbelievable!
    Some will surely see this as politically-incorrect stereotyping but...what the heck.
    I was one of two caucasions in a 65+ piece school concert band, the majority of whom were Japanese-American, as was the band director (as well, for that matter, was the entire school).

    Not each person by any means, but as a large percentage of the group, the Japanese kids, when they set their minds to something -in this case learning their instruments- they shedded their butts off. I remember my band director and I looking at our concert-master clarinetist as he was practicing one day, and the band director remarking, "That's the way with Japanese. Once they decide to do something their almost fanatical about it". In music, I've seen this over and over, again. Sometimes it's just plain scary.
    Last edited by gary; 02-10-2007 at 03:32 AM.
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    I teach middle school band in the US and have seen students who have moved from S. Korea start 4 years behind the other students and become the best player in the section in 1 year.

    I also do not want to stereo-type Asians and Asian-Americans; however, the first flute in both 7th and 8th grade band are Asian boys. My top 8th grade flute player from last year and number one in our county is a Taiwanese student.

    Maybe the SOTW who are from or live in Asia can comment. I'd be very insterested in learning the philosophy and how it can be used for every day teaching.

  11. #11
    The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum Contributor 2014 gary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jentone
    Maybe the SOTW who are from or live in Asia can comment. I'd be very insterested in learning the philosophy and how it can be used for every day teaching
    Nah, JT. If they were practicing thier butts off....they wouldn't be here.
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  12. #12
    Distinguished SOTW Member/Logician Grumps's Avatar
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    Which one is Randall?

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    Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2006 rcwjd's Avatar
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    The efforts of these students are worthy of praise. But, believe it or not, plain old American farm kids used to be able to do the same thing. Of course, that was in the days that their parents gave a damn - pressured school boards into supporting music in the schools - and hired the people to make it happen. In the mid-60s through the end of the 60s I went to high school in a little farm town (my graduating class had around 120 in it). Yet, I was a member of a stage band (what we were called then) that regularly played Basie, etc., and actually gigged at college beauty contests and the like as a pit band. That was because the school board hired a band director who could take virtually any of us hicks and get music out of us. It gave me a lifelong appreciation for jazz and big-band. I appluad these Japanese students - but it is nothing extraordinary. Any school in our country could do it too if we simply had the will to encourage it. Sadly, we have bought into the PC drivel that we no longer can afford such "luxuries" in our schools, and instead must reserve such activities for specialty schools for "gifted" students. Sorry for the rant, but in truth, any nationality, creed, race, religion or sex could do what those students did if given half a chance.

  14. #14
    The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum Contributor 2014 gary's Avatar
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    I am on very thin PC ground here and run the risk of being misunderstood -I hope not- but I'll give it a go.

    Without comment or analysis, simply looking at the history of immigration to Hawaii, one finds that within about one generation of when the Chinese were imported, and they were off the plantation fields and into mercantile and other enterprises. Likewise, within about one generation the Japanese were off the plantations and into the professions and education. Yet there were other national groups who languished in the sugar cane and pineapple fields for generations.
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    My mother is Chinese, and I think that the "secret" to this kind of work ethic is to have a nagging Asian mother! I would say (based on my observations) that nagging Jewish mothers have similar effects.

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    Got to agree with rcwjd on this one. If the opportunity is there, if there's significant support (or pressure) at home, if the teacher is motivated, and if the kids think it's "cool" you'd be surprised where good jazz bands will pop up.
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  17. #17

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    As the result of a maturnity leave of a friend and colleague, for the first time in decades, I'm in an elementary classroom this year with a group of 10 and 11 year old sax students. As near as I can tell, none of them practice at all. The days of the nagging mother seem to have passed here, perhaps with my mother's passing.
    Now, these kids are busy with lots of stuff, and the testing requirements for schools in Massachusetts have changed the nature of schooling, but the moms still want to know why little Johnny isn't getting any better.
    When I was at Berklee I was involved in their high school stage band competitions. Bands showed up like the one in these videos. Tight and snappy, and a very good thing in general terms. Still, something bothers me about bands like this. Perhaps it is the memorization. Kids who can be brought to this level may be better off doing more reading and learning to improvise, rather than taking all the effort required to learn these pieces from memory, solos and all, great as that achievement is. Sure is impressive, though.

  18. #18
    The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum Contributor 2014 gary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by danarsenault
    Still, something bothers me about bands like this. Perhaps it is the memorization. Kids who can be brought to this level may be better off doing more reading and learning to improvise....
    Not to worry, Dan.

    I wouldn't be surprised if they're not doing that, too. The bone section solos weren't too shabby. In my experience, good bone players are scarcer than the other wind players. And in sections, regardless of instruments, it's often only one or two kids who are decent improvisers. Yet these bone players were good players in a field of rarity and overall not too shabby improvisers to boot.

    Anyway - I wonder if they need a bus driver.
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  19. #19
    Distinguished SOTW Member G-dawg's Avatar
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    I do see a lack of parent support (in the US) in some regards, but then there's something else, too.

    The students I teach are extrememly busy with academics and stuff outside of school. Many do soccer 2-4 nights a week outside of school, or gymnastics, or baseball. Some also take piano lessons or voice lessons. Some travel with their parents on a business trip outside the state or country.

    That's not a lack of parent support, is it????

    Yeah, they are spread thin quite often, and yeah, they have to make choices. Music is not always their first choice.

    Now, having said all that, these same students will be the first ones hanging out with their friends, playing video games, or "veggin" in front of the TV. I guess they might need a break, but...???

    Something else I wonder is how many of those great young musicians in the video will still be playing their horns in 20+ years??? It's one thing to be good but not enjoy it. It's something else to enjoy playing music at a young age, even if you aren't the best.

    Do the kids look like they are having fun??? Hard for me to tell.

    I think I might be rambling.... Better stop!!!

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    Thanks for the link, loved it.

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