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  1. #61
    A.Smith's Avatar
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    To quote from A la francaise:

    A pioneer on his instrument, Mule seems to have identified the characteristics of a French 'classical' aesthetic. Taking his cue from 'le beau chant', his studies of vibrato and of beauty of sound were at the heart of his work. This approach, aiming to trace the timbres back to the original sources, is not that dissimilar to that of composers of spectral music, shedding an astonishingly topical light on the work of this creator of the modern saxophone.......
    What is happening to this heritage at the moment when the doors of time are closing upon the twentieth century? Aligning himself with the tradition of Marcel Mule, Claude Delangle has considered this very point, concluding: 'This music forms part of my culture and, as such, it posses an educative value which I, in turn, am obliged to pass on. His aesthetic remains full of meaning, even if now we regard it from some distance.'

  2. #62
    Angel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.Smith
    To quote from A la francaise:

    A pioneer on his instrument, Mule seems to have identified the characteristics of a French 'classical' aesthetic. Taking his cue from 'le beau chant', his studies of vibrato and of beauty of sound were at the heart of his work. This approach, aiming to trace the timbres back to the original sources, is not that dissimilar to that of composers of spectral music, shedding an astonishingly topical light on the work of this creator of the modern saxophone.......
    What is happening to this heritage at the moment when the doors of time are closing upon the twentieth century? Aligning himself with the tradition of Marcel Mule, Claude Delangle has considered this very point, concluding: 'This music forms part of my culture and, as such, it posses an educative value which I, in turn, am obliged to pass on. His aesthetic remains full of meaning, even if now we regard it from some distance.'
    Totally and absolutely agreed.

    We can no more forsake our own heritage than claim a 100% original approach. Though I can't put my finger on it right this late minute (thanks for the challenge, Rick!), I can guarantee that if you visit me, we'll come to an agreement that Delangle's fresh interpretations are naturally descended from a combination of Mule-influenced Deffayet, Delangle's impeccable clarinetist brother Remy, his sublime wife Odile, and doubtless other contemporaries.

    Angel
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  3. #63
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    Remi is actually Claude's son. He did a year of study in Sydney while he was still in high school, before he got into Paris con. He sounds really good now days. He plays a lot of the tango stuff with Claude at the moment.

  4. #64

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    Indeed. I have some great, recent recordings of Claude and son together (though I'm not sure if Odile is at the piano).
    When CD visited Minnesota while I was still there, I was practicing away one morning, and heard a bassoonist in the next room really tearing it up. Sounded like an upperclassman, if not a grad student, sound wise; just beautiful!! As I took a break and walked by the window, I saw Claudes 8 year old daughter with her Bassoon. Music runs strong in their blood, no doubt about it!

    Steve P

  5. #65
    Angel's Avatar
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    Amazing. I heard a recording somewhere of Claude and Remy, and I assumed that the mature artist on the clarinet was his brother. Extremely impressive playing for a young person.

    Angel
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  6. #66
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    Incredible for a guy who's about 22. But the interesting story with Remi is that it took him a few attempts to get into the Paris con. Demonstrates that there's no bias what so ever in the system in Paris

  7. #67
    Forum Contributor 2010 & Distinguished SOTW Member qwerty's Avatar
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    Default Re: "Schools" of playing

    Gut:

    My mom always warned me to not have a battle of wits with an unarmed person, but I'll try anyway.

    Your comments are abrasive and at times nonsensical.

    I have been a lifelong "American/French School" taught saxophonist. Yet this past Novemeber at the Rascher 100 birthday celebration Concerto Concert, you could have knocked me over with a feather after Harry White's performance of the Larsson. It was the one of the most technically refined, musically nuanced, expressive in short stunning solo performances I have ever heard. I do not limit myself to listening to saxophonists either. I have many living greats solo with orchestras in my close to 30 years in music, and this performance cited was one of the best I have ever heard. Period.

    I have no clue what your motives are here, or why you seem to have your bloomers all in a knot over Rascher, the Rascher School and contemporary literature, but you just have to chill. This is saxophone for gosh sake, something that ought to bring you some pleasure. Take a breath and get over yourself, man!

    Steve
    Without music to decorate it, time is just a bunch of boring production deadlines or dates by which bills must be paid. -- F.Z.

  8. #68
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    Default Re: "Schools" of playing

    Quote Originally Posted by A.Smith View Post
    Incredible for a guy who's about 22. But the interesting story with Remi is that it took him a few attempts to get into the Paris con. Demonstrates that there's no bias what so ever in the system in Paris

    What's always been amazing to me is that his father was only 30 when he was appointed as the Professor of Saxophone at the Paris Conservatory...
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  9. #69
    Seeker Of A Clever Title. zxcvbnm's Avatar
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    Default Re: "Schools" of playing

    Just wondering, what school would james houlik be considered in? I know he studied with rascher but...
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  10. #70
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    Default Re: "Schools" of playing

    Quote Originally Posted by zxcvbnm View Post
    Just wondering, what school would james houlik be considered in? I know he studied with rascher but...
    Technically, he's a Rascher guy because that's where his main course of study comes from, and since we are talking historical roots, it puts him in that category.

    But Houlik is one of those guys who sort of blurs the lines - because his main focus is tenor, his manner of teaching and playing is really in another class. He's not a "Lunatic Fringe" guy either - he hasn't formed a cult of personality around himself, which is the main qualification for that classification.
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  11. #71
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    Default Re: "Schools" of playing

    Quote Originally Posted by zxcvbnm View Post
    Just wondering, what school would james houlik be considered in? I know he studied with rascher but...
    In some ways, he's more "Rascher-school" than anyone else. In other ways, he absolutely is outside of the box.

    I would consider him Rascher school. His pedagogy has much more in common with Rascher's than anyone else's saxophonistically. Artistically, he doesn't seem like he's from a saxo lineage at all.

    The really interesting part is that I'm trying to remember any two of his students playing or even sounding alike. Somehow, we're all way different.

    Angel
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  12. #72

    Default Re: "Schools" of playing

    Quote Originally Posted by qwerty View Post
    Gut:

    Yet this past Novemeber at the Rascher 100 birthday celebration Concerto Concert, you could have knocked me over with a feather after Harry White's performance of the Larsson. It was the one of the most technically refined, musically nuanced, expressive in short stunning solo performances I have ever heard. I do not limit myself to listening to saxophonists either. I have many living greats solo with orchestras in my close to 30 years in music, and this performance cited was one of the best I have ever heard. Period.

    Steve
    I think everyone there was similarly stunned by his performance. Everyone walked out of the hall glassy-eyed. I still get that feeling when I think back to it!
    Chris Condon

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  13. #73
    Seeker Of A Clever Title. zxcvbnm's Avatar
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    Default Re: "Schools" of playing

    Quote Originally Posted by Achristocrat View Post
    I think everyone there was similarly stunned by his performance. Everyone walked out of the hall glassy-eyed. I still get that feeling when I think back to it!
    Lol, everyone seems to be raving about this performance...
    Wish I could have seen it. Any chance that it was recorded?
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  14. #74

    Default Re: "Schools" of playing

    I'd similarly like to hear a recording of that performance if one exists. When I heard about the concert, that was one the performances that I was most upset about not being able to hear (I really love the concerto and Harry White's playing in general.) I'm glad to hear that it was apparently as incredible as I had imagined, though I wish even more that I could have been there...

  15. #75

    Default Re: "Schools" of playing

    Quote Originally Posted by zxcvbnm View Post
    Lol, everyone seems to be raving about this performance...
    Wish I could have seen it. Any chance that it was recorded?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pkjsy...eature=related

  16. #76

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    Default Re: "Schools" of playing

    Thank you very much.
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  17. #77
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    Default Re: "Schools" of playing

    This whole Grandteacher thing bugs me (I remember another thread that mentioned this).....It doesn't make sense and its name dropping at its worst. Also it does nothing in defining who you are as a player.

  18. #78
    Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian paulwl's Avatar
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    Default Re: "Schools" of playing

    Well, it's a way of declaring your loyalties, if you have them. But music ideally ought to be above loyalties.
    Jazz = a man with a $5,000 horn driving a $500 car to a $50 gig.
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  19. #79
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    Default Re: "Schools" of playing

    Quote Originally Posted by sonnymobleytrane View Post
    This whole Grandteacher thing bugs me (I remember another thread that mentioned this).....It doesn't make sense and its name dropping at its worst. Also it does nothing in defining who you are as a player.
    Just like there is a Russian method to piano/violin or a Suzuki method or whatever, so it is with the saxophone. That's the best analogy I can draw for you. The fact is that there are differences in pedagogy, and players from different "schools" of thought will come out sounding differently. You can take different paths and (as has been noted) things are coming more and more together.

    I don't understand why people have such a big problem with the concept that there are different schools of thought when it comes to the saxophone. It's pretty much accepted that there are different "schools" on every other major instrument that I can think of: clarinet (French vs. German) piano (Russian, French, several others), violin (you name it). There are even two methods on the theremin! (One is named for Clara Rockmore, and I can't remember what the other is called.) This is not a foreign concept, nor is it unique to the saxophone.
    Current setups:
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  20. #80
    Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
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    Default Re: "Schools" of playing

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Max View Post
    Just like there is a Russian method to piano/violin or a Suzuki method or whatever, so it is with the saxophone. That's the best analogy I can draw for you. The fact is that there are differences in pedagogy, and players from different "schools" of thought will come out sounding differently. You can take different paths and (as has been noted) things are coming more and more together.

    I don't understand why people have such a big problem with the concept that there are different schools of thought when it comes to the saxophone. It's pretty much accepted that there are different "schools" on every other major instrument that I can think of: clarinet (French vs. German) piano (Russian, French, several others), violin (you name it). There are even two methods on the theremin! (One is named for Clara Rockmore, and I can't remember what the other is called.) This is not a foreign concept, nor is it unique to the saxophone.


    I understand this. Even in Jazz ones influences become apparent in their playing....I just think the term Grand-teacher is a little Cheesy. Kind of reminds me of the Kevin Bacon game.

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