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Thread: Discolored mouthpiece: how to fix?

  1. #1
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    Default Discolored mouthpiece: how to fix?

    Hello mouthpiece pundits!

    I hope I am in the right spot and that the question is not too trivial... I didn't find any help after performing a search on "mouthpiece discoloration".
    Well I left my Hard Rubber mouthpiece (newly acquired near mint Selmer S90) inadvertently for a while in the sun the other day (less than an hour --had to take care of my small kid, it's like entering a time hole). Didn't know that NJ winter sun can be so strong!
    Result: mouthpiece got a suntan, ie became brownish on one side.
    Is there anything I can do to revert this discoloration? rub some product? wait?

    Thanks a LOT in advance... (I feel soooo dumb sometimes... oh was I smart, so I thought, before I had kids)...maybe your advice will also help that guy who left his mpc in the Texan sun but doesn't want to confess...

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    The best trick I know is to take a very small amount of olive oil, apply it to the piece and then whipe it down. This is only a cosmetic fix as it will need to be repeated if the piece if washed with soap and water. It does bring it back close to black and leaves no taste. It also is not sticky or detectable in any other way. Paul Coats suggested this at one time and it works nicely...it also works with greenish pieces.

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    Distinguished SOTW Columnist / Forum Contributor 2008 Hurling Frootmig's Avatar
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    There's no way to reverse the process of oxidation. I collect fountain pens and collectors have been after the holy grail solution on how to restore Black Chased Hard Rubber for years and the only thing that removes oxidation is polishing but that removes the fine detail from BCHR.
    "We'd all play like Stan (Getz) if we could" - John Coltrane

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    Quote Originally Posted by AhCheung
    Thanks a LOT in advance... (I feel soooo dumb sometimes... oh was I smart, so I thought, before I had kids)...maybe your advice will also help that guy who left his mpc in the Texan sun but doesn't want to confess...
    Well, I'll confess to leaving my mp in the blazing north German sun ... with the same result. If it's any consolation, it's had no effect on how the piece plays. I wouldn't worry about it.

  5. #5
    Mouthpiece Refacer Extraordinaire and Forum Contributor 2010 EZ's Avatar
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    I've wondered if any kind of long-term soaking in something like lemon oil would "replenish" the HR for any length of time. Maybe I'll do a test myself to see what happens. If anything interesting happens, I'll let you know.

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    This has been discussed on the forum before, though I don't know what search term will give you the results. In brief:

    1) To remove calcification, soak in vinegar.

    2) To restore oxidation, rub with olive oil.

    3) If 1) and 2) don't work to your satisfaction, mix everything together for your next batch of salad dressing.

  7. #7

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    This is not a perfect fix but it is superior to olive oil and does restore the finish and colour to a certain degree.
    Mothers car finish products supplies a tire dressing / rubber preservative that is made in part from grape seed extract.... yeah it actually smells like grapes. Taste is not great if you do not wipe off all residue but is not toxic. You put it on and buff it off once dry, darkens up faded rubber pieces very well after a few treatments, once you get the optimum darkness no need to retreat. The piece does not fade ... but then I haven't left a piece out on the drive way so who knows?
    I have enhanced the appearance of more then a few pieces for resale this way with no complaints.
    E pluribus unum
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    Vinegar!

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    Thanks a lot everyone for the tips... I always have olive oil handy (I believe in miracles)... so in conclusion I should try olive oil on my tires?

  10. #10

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    Hello ..... Sassaphone! Vinegar is used to clean the calcification! You know the white grundge that builds up on a mouthpiece from constant use.

    The olive oil is used to darken the piece. If you want to use a oil I would suggest Almond or a mineral oil. Olive oil will go rancid with time ... not a healthy option, tastes and smells like sh@t when it turns.

    To each their own.
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