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Thread: Slurred Staccato

  1. #1

    Default Slurred Staccato

    Can someone tell me how to play notes that are to be played staccato, and slurred simultaneously. Thanks.

  2. #2

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    Default Re: Slurred Staccato

    Staccato actually means to only play half of the note's full value. Just slur the notes, but put in some separation (smooth staccato?).
    So try using the syllables "too-o-o-o..." when you play passages with a slur and a staccato.

  3. #3
    The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum Contributor 2014 gary's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slurred Staccato

    There's no such thing*. Are you looking at something that is notated with stacatto dots above the notes and with a long "slur" over a measure or several measures? If you are, that is not a slur mark, it's a phrase mark. Could you please explain what are you looking at and how is it notated?

    *n.b. "as notes that are to be played staccato, and slurred simultaneously".
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    Distinguished SOTW member daigle65's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slurred Staccato

    It's called louré articulation.
    It comes from string music where the notes are slightly detached within the same bow direction.
    It's basically the same as tenuto.
    " M'enfin ! " ....Gaston Lagaffe

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    Default Re: Slurred Staccato

    Quote Originally Posted by gary View Post
    There's no such thing. Are you looking at something that is notated with stacatto dots above the notes and with a long "slur" over a measure or several measures? If you are, that is not a slur mark, it's a phrase mark. Could you please explain what are you looking at and how is it notated?
    Oops, my bad. I think the OP may be talking about these (in the picture on the website)

    http://stringtechnique.com/pedagogy/rightint3.html
    Quote Originally Posted by daigle65 View Post
    It's called louré articulation.
    It comes from string music where the notes are slightly detached within the same bow direction.
    It's basically the same as tenuto.
    Thank you. Learning new things everyday.
    What is the true definition of tenuto? I have been taught that it means to play a note at its full value, but that doesn't match up with the 'slurred staccatos'?

  6. #6
    Allen Halstead's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slurred Staccato

    This notation is used a lot in the Ferling book ... as daigle said, I refer to it as tenuto, a smooth phrase slightly articulated ... maybe oboists see it more than we do?
    Tenor ..1973 Selmer Mark VI #211xxx .... RPC .115B ... Vandoren M/O lig ...
    Alto ...Yanagisawa A991 #320XXX....RPC .090B ... Vandoren M/O lig ....
    Sop.... CB Vintage Reborn .... RPC .080...... Brancher gold Lig ....

  7. #7
    The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum Contributor 2014 gary's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slurred Staccato

    I believe the loure is notated with legato markings and a slur mark, not a staccato marking.

    If it is individual notes with staccato markings and there are slur markings over the notes, as in the Ferling 48 Studies for example, then I would play them with a slight, smooth detachment.

    BTW, I do not believe this marking is very prevalent in the 48 Studies; maybe four or five places at best.
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  8. #8
    Forum Contributor 2011 legitalto's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slurred Staccato

    It's called "Portato." Think long but seperated. Derek has it right.

  9. #9
    The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum Contributor 2014 gary's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slurred Staccato

    Quote Originally Posted by legitalto View Post
    It's called "Portato." Think long but seperated. Derek has it right.
    So Loure is French and Portato is Italian for the same bowing technique. "You say portato and I say . . . "
    My apologies to all. And I even studied bowing. That's what I get for relying on my obviously waning memory. Mama mia!
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  10. #10

    Default Re: Slurred Staccato

    Quote Originally Posted by daigle65 View Post
    It's called louré articulation.
    It comes from string music where the notes are slightly detached within the same bow direction.
    It's basically the same as tenuto.
    This

  11. #11

    Default Re: Slurred Staccato

    Thanks for the feedback. For those who are not sure what I meant, here's an example:

    4 eighth notes (each of a different tone), with a staccato dot above each, and a slur mark above the 4 notes. I came across this notation in Rubank's advanced volume.

  12. #12
    Funnpun's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slurred Staccato

    I've only seen this while playing violin.

  13. #13
    The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum Contributor 2014 gary's Avatar
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    Default Re: Slurred Staccato

    Quote Originally Posted by Funnpun View Post
    I've only seen this while playing violin.
    I checked my Ferling as mentioned above, there were actually not a lot of places, but there were four or five places that I noticed this notation. I've seen it in other music for winds. I didn't want to post it because it would look like I was just making a lame excuse, but actually there is a lot of ambiguity about the terminology and even the notation of this. I believe it is also notated with long lines versus short dots above the notes, to mean exactly the same bowing effect. How's that for contradictory notation?

    Considering it's a bowing notation for a wind instrument, I would suppose you translate that the best you can. Actually, I don't think I was that far off in post #7. Perhaps with a slight emphasis on the tones depending on the musical context, which would take precedence over it all, anyway. It would be nice if this thread catches the eye of one of the forum's university profs and get their take on how to best play this notation.
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    You can't blow it if you haven't lived it.

    TK Melody UL soprano
    Selmer S80 Serie II alto
    Julius Keilwerth SX90R tenor


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