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  1. #1

    Default B&N Soprano Mouthpieces

    Hi All :
    A friend of mine is offering me an B&N soprano mouthpiece , I am using a Yamaha 5C but it is too closed for my taste. But I do not find info about his B&N mouthpiece. ( It looks like they could be from Europe ...). This one in particular is #4.
    Any information about it ?
    Also I would like to hear your opinions about the Rico Royal #7 against the Yamaha 5C.. ( According to the charts is more open than the Yamaha, but related to the sound and playablity which one could be better? I prefer open mouthpieces ,as the Yamaha feels closed to me.
    Many thanks in advance
    Humbardi

  2. #2
    Distinguished SOTW Member/ Forum Contributor 2011
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    Default Re: B&N Soprano Mouthpieces

    Quote Originally Posted by Humbardi View Post
    Hi All :
    A friend of mine is offering me an B&N soprano mouthpiece , I am using a Yamaha 5C but it is too closed for my taste. But I do not find info about his B&N mouthpiece. ( It looks like they could be from Europe ...). This one in particular is #4.
    Any information about it ?
    Also I would like to hear your opinions about the Rico Royal #7 against the Yamaha 5C.. ( According to the charts is more open than the Yamaha, but related to the sound and playablity which one could be better? I prefer open mouthpieces ,as the Yamaha feels closed to me.
    Many thanks in advance
    Humbardi
    The B&N pieces were made in Brazil?, or at least somewhere in South America I believe. It was Bob Ackerman and Norberto Capucci who were mainly responsible for those pieces as far I know. Bob Ackerman had Ted Klum reface a bunch of them and those ones are the ones that got the reputation. Mark Turner used to play one, along with many other NYC pros that got them through Bob (or from shops that got them from Bob).

    They made resin soprano/alto/tenor pieces (based on the Selmer Scroll soprano, Meyer NY alto, Otto Link/Berg Larsen/Dukoff) as well as metal castings for the whole range of various different vintage originals.

    In short, you want one of the ones with TK # (# meaning some 2 or 3 digit tip number in thousandths of an inch).

    They're really great mouthpieces when properly setup, but I've owned a few that weren't touched by Ted that were pretty good (but not anything close pieces done by Ted).

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