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Thread: 9937

  1. #1

    Default 9937

    These things cost more than some cars. They sure do look nice, but what is so special about them that justifies the cost? How is the sound and playability? i haven't seen much hype about them but they do look tempting.

  2. #2
    Just a guy who plays saxophone. swperry1's Avatar
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    Default Re: 99337

    What is a 99337?

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    Just a guy who plays saxophone. swperry1's Avatar
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    Default Re: 99337

    Yanagisawa I assume? Yes, looks very nice...Never played a Yanagisawa tenor.

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    Default Re: 99337

    I think it is the silver-content that makes the price higher. They have variations but a solid-silver body these days could make it pretty spendy. DAVE
    Dave

  6. #6

    Default Re: 99337

    could anyone comment on the sound and playability?

  7. #7
    Distinguished SOTW Member Agent27's Avatar
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    Default Re: 99337

    I haven't played that model (I'm not sure many here have), but I've played others. My alto is an 880. Yanagisawa's are fantastic horns. I don't know why one in this finish should be any different.

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    Distinguished SOTW Member piwikiwi's Avatar
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    Default Re: 99337

    i played it once. It was really amazing too bad it didn't have enough money at that moment.
    Selmer Reference 54 tenor, Stan getz legends series 6*, Rico jazz select 3H

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    Forum Contributor 2014 Pete Thomas's Avatar
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    Default Re: 99337

    I tried one last year at the frankfurt Musikmesse. A very nice horn, but I found that when pushed a little harder, the sound kind of wimped out a bit. In the end I bought an R & C (which was about the same price I think)

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    Default Re: 99337

    Primarily the cost is due to the amount of silver used. I have tried one but found it a little too bright and zingy so opted for the 9932 instead, which has a bronze body. All Yani horns are beautifully made, play well and sound great. Me feeling on the 99xx series is they have a full bodied sound compared to other horns in the range. Others who have played my sax often comment on the sound being very "focused". I don't think the Yani sound is to everyone's taste, got to try them and see.

  11. #11
    Forum Contributor 2014 Pete Thomas's Avatar
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    Default Re: 99337

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyB1970 View Post
    Primarily the cost is due to the amount of silver used. I have tried one but found it a little too bright and zingy.
    Just goes to show, I found it not at all bright or zingy. But very nice in a soft smooth kind of way.

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    Default Re: 99337

    Total silver actually makes the horn play darker, although your optics may think otherwise. Silver and Bronze resonate differently than brass. People think King Siver-Sonics play brighter than there brass counterparts, not true. I've owned both. Although it may be difficult, try a Selmer Series III solid silver and a standard lacquer, the solid silver is much darker, more suitable for classical. Here is a description from the master Ted Klum on Solid Silver mouthpieces...
    "The heavier, denser sterling silver produces a darker, warmer sound while retaining a brilliant top end. This metal resonates at a lower frequency than brass and often requires a little time for your playing to "tune in" to the resonance in order to achieve the potential of the sterling silver sound."

  13. #13
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    Default Re: 99337

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Thomas View Post
    Just goes to show, I found it not at all bright or zingy. But very nice in a soft smooth kind of way.
    Interesting, I only played for a short while when play testing some saxes but I don't remember it being soft and smooth. When the opportunity arises I'll have to give it another go.

    Steve (Howard) had a short blow on my 9932J yesterday, if time had allowed it would have been great to have him write a review on this sax.

  14. #14
    Distinguished SOTW Technician Stephen Howard's Avatar
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    Default Re: 99337

    Quote Originally Posted by Berg-Man View Post
    Total silver actually makes the horn play darker
    And yet another manufacturer says "The resonance of silver is much faster...giving a much broader and edgier sound".

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyB1970 View Post
    Me feeling on the 99xx series is they have a full bodied sound compared to other horns in the range. Others who have played my sax often comment on the sound being very "focused". I don't think the Yani sound is to everyone's taste, got to try them and see.
    I'd agree with 'focussed'- your tenor was very evenly-balanced, with just the right amount of richness in the lower end (without the bloat of low-end boom that plagues a lot of rich-sounding horns) which developed nicely into a silky top-end.
    This would seem to be what you get for the extra money over and above the standard models...just a bit more cohesion and evenness.

    Regards,
    Stephen Howard
    www.shwoodwind.co.uk
    - Woodwind instrument repairs & period restorations
    Author, Haynes Saxophone Manual, Haynes Clarinet Manual

  15. #15
    Distinguished SOTW Member/Saxus Envious Curmudgeonum Randall's Avatar
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    Default Re: 99337

    I OWN a 9937 alto, and I find pretty much all the comments here to be fairly well off, with respect to my experience. To date, I have played 5 different A9937 horns, 3 T9937s an 1 B9937. I have also played 3 9930 sopranos.

    First, let me say that because a horn is pricey or not has no bearing on my judgement as to the quality or desirability (sp?). Also, on alto, I play a high baffle Yani metal #9 mp with 2.5 or 3.0 Alexander Superials. I want a dynamic sound with some zing. I get it!

    1. I have played just about every production alto that is currently being made, and I found that the Yani 9937 is the very best of the best. That may sound general, but that is what I mean. ALL AROUND great horn. It sings, it whispers, it peels paint. The mechanisms, the ergos, the aesthetics are all there. It is THE HORN, IMO.
    The only thing I have played that I would say was better, was the Inderbinen alto- which was simply effortless to play and dynamic beyond anything I have ever played in my life. I sat down and played it for an hour and it felt like 10 minutes...truly a sublime experience. If a horn can be said to "play itself", then that horn surely qualified.

    2. While I have also played all the other variations of the Yani's including those mentioned here, I found them all lacking the "zing" the 9937 has.

    3. I too owned a Selmer Series III solid silver alto. It was indeed a bit darker sounding than the Yani. However, I wouldn't go so far to say it was a "classical" music horn, although it could be used in that genre, no doubt. No "zing" factor, that is for sure.

    4. I had a one-off Keilwerth solid silver Shadow alto. I bought it from Mr. Keilwerth himself. Once again, a great player, but no where near the "zing" of the 9937. This horn could play both dark or bright...but had more of a presence than the Selmer III. Still, couldn't hold a candle to the Yani.

    5. Despite what the materials-don't-matter nazis here may say, the materials DO matter. Silver clearly resonates differently from brass. I have had discussions with people in the saxophone production/manufacturing industry, bassoon production industry and flute production industry and they ALL say that the metals (or wood, as the case may be) and alloys used have a direct bearing on the response and tonal quality of a horn. One exec of a well known instrument manufacturer told me that metal used and the process of heating and cooling the metal used in the bocal was the secret of their bassoon. Of course he didn't tell me the secret process... lol.

    6. My experiences with silver vs. anything else, have proven to me, over and over again, that silver is superior material for horns. I own two solid silver saxes now, the Yani A9937, a B&S Sterling Silver Medusa Special tenor, and a Silver sonic Super 20 tenor. I have found that a sterling silver neck can transform a brass horn too. I use solid silver necks on my Ref 54 tenor (a Series III SS neck), and my Model 6 alto (a Goodson SS neck or a Series III SS neck). When I can afford one, I will definitely get a Yani 9930 one-piece sterling soprano.
    Soprano: Martin Handcraft stencil- American Professional Altos: Yanagisawa A-pattern 9937 sterling, Saxgourmet Model 6, Cannonball 98, JK SX90 straight, Viking M21 Swing Sonic, TJ Prototype Sterling Silver, Vintage King C-mels: Aquila Sax matte black nickle Tenors: King Super 20 Silversonic, B&S Sterling Medusa, Ref 54, Buescher 400 TH&C Bari: JK SX90R satin silver, Maxtone flat matte laq. I am not a paid endorser for ANYTHING!

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    Default Re: 99337

    A friend of mine had a T9937. He couldn't play it in tune with his band at the time. I still don't know if something was out of adjustment or what, but it was a joy to play with a lot of 'zing'. I wish I had acquired it from him at the time, but I didn't have the loot. I love Yanagisawas in general and the 9937 is tits! They've almost doubled in price since I had that one in my mitts. I am happy with my 990 though; and with the extra septims in my pocket.
    "The key to improvising is being able to play and listen at the same time."

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    Default Re: 99337

    Quote Originally Posted by hgiles View Post
    I love Yanagisawas in general and the 9937 is tits!
    They've almost doubled in price since I had that one in my mitts. .
    It's grimey hgiles!

    I love Yanagisawa!
    Them be the tits.
    They double in da price
    Since I had 'em in my mitts.

    (verse 2)

    I detest de Selemar
    Dem be all ******
    I never had a good one
    I say dat is a pity.

    etcetera
    "The sound of tireless voices is the price we pay for the right to hear the music of our own opinions."

  18. #18

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    Default Re: 99337

    One other note on Yani Tenors. The darker alloy horns (bronze & silver) use metal resonators, where as the brass 991 has nylon. The change in resos I believe is to balance the horns.

  19. #19
    Distinguished SOTW Technician Stephen Howard's Avatar
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    Default Re: 99337

    Quote Originally Posted by Randall View Post
    5. Despite what the materials-don't-matter nazis here may say, the materials DO matter. Silver clearly resonates differently from brass. I have had discussions with people in the saxophone production/manufacturing industry, bassoon production industry and flute production industry and they ALL say that the metals (or wood, as the case may be) and alloys used have a direct bearing on the response and tonal quality of a horn. One exec of a well known instrument manufacturer told me that metal used and the process of heating and cooling the metal used in the bocal was the secret of their bassoon. Of course he didn't tell me the secret process... lol.
    Sure, they all say silver makes a difference to the tone - it's just that none of them can agree on exactly what it is.
    The whole thing is a joke, the likes of which could only have been penned by Monty Python...

    Punter (Eric Idle): Hello, is this a saxophone shop?
    Seller (John Cleese): It certainly is Sir!
    Punter: In that case I'd like to buy a tenor saxophone
    Seller: Certainly Sir, did you have any kind of sound in mind?
    Punter: Well, I'd like something nice and warm in tone.
    Seller: Ah, you want a solid silver tenor!
    Punter: I do?
    Seller: Indeed Sir. Silver is noted for its mellowness.
    Punter: Well that's good, but I don't want it to be too mellow.
    Seller: In that case Sir, you want a solid silver tenor.
    Punter: Eh?
    Seller: Oh yes, Sir, silver is noted for its brightness.
    Punter: But won't that make the sound too harsh?
    Seller: Not at all Sir, silver is noted for its darkness.
    Punter: Well OK, but I don't want it to sound too muddy.
    Seller: Have no fear Sir, Silver is noted for its edginess.
    Punter: OK, well I'm a bit confused, so are there any other options?
    Seller: But of course Sir, you could have one with an annealed body.
    Punter: Oooh, what's that then?
    Seller: An annealed body is where they heat-treat the metal to soften it - it gives the best tone.
    Punter: Oh dear, won't that mean the metal will bend easily?
    Seller: In that case Sir you want a hand-hammered body
    Punter: What will that do then?
    Seller: Hand hammering hardens the metal Sir.
    Punter: And what does that do to the tone?
    Seller: It gives the best tone, Sir.
    Punter: That sounds good - I'll have one!
    Seller: Very wise, Sir. Now, do you want one with ribs or one without ribs?
    Punter: Oooerr, what's the difference?
    Seller: Well Sir, the one with ribs has a quick response.
    Punter: And what about the one without ribs?
    Seller: The one without ribs has a quick response.
    Punter: Great, I'll take it!!
    Seller: One more thing Sir, do you want it lacquered or unlacquered?
    Punter: Umm, let me guess...does unlacquered give the best tone?
    Seller: Sir is clearly very perceptive - yes, an unlacquered sax sounds brighter.
    Punter: Ah, in that case I'll take the lacquered one.
    Seller: A most perspicacious choice Sir, lacquer gives a brighter tone.
    Stage right - enter Graham Chapman:

    Stephen Howard
    www.shwoodwind.co.uk
    - Woodwind instrument repairs & period restorations
    Author, Haynes Saxophone Manual, Haynes Clarinet Manual

  20. #20
    Forum Contributor 2014 Pete Thomas's Avatar
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    Default Re: 99337

    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Howard View Post
    Sure, they all say silver makes a difference to the tone -
    It does make a very big difference to the tone. It's just common sense isn't it that different metals will resonate differently and so saxophones made of different materials will have very different sounds......if you hit them with a hammer.

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