Antigua Winds
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  1. #41
    Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru milandro's Avatar
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    Default Re: Soprano sax - curved or straight body?

    well, checking for leaks is the first thing to do, invest in a leak light or make one for yourself but if you have a leak you probably need a tech to fix it anyway so atrip to the shop (especially if it is free ) seems to be mandatory.

    Soprano gurgles, though, could be generated by a combination of a mouthpiece not pushed in enough and a weak embouchure. If the tech tells you that the horn is sealing well, then look at this possibility.

  2. #42
    Forum Contributor 2011 Sterling Archer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Soprano sax - curved or straight body?

    Quote Originally Posted by milandro View Post
    well, checking for leaks is the first thing to do, invest in a leak light or make one for yourself but if you have a leak you probably need a tech to fix it anyway so atrip to the shop (especially if it is free ) seems to be mandatory.

    Soprano gurgles, though, could be generated by a combination of a mouthpiece not pushed in enough and a weak embouchure. If the tech tells you that the horn is sealing well, then look at this possibility.
    Cool. Thank you. The gurgle went away for E when I pushed the mouthpiece in a good bit (was still there for D and further). Maybe I didn't have it in far enough. Like you said...if there are no issues with the horn, I'll start there.

  3. #43
    Forum Contributor 2014 Pete Thomas's Avatar
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    Default Re: Soprano sax - curved or straight body?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr G View Post
    Then the marketing plan works!

    P.S. P. Mauriat is not French nor is Cannonball made in North America.
    Some of the top end TJ are assembled in England, they can legally call them made in England I believe.

  4. #44
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    Default Re: Soprano sax - curved or straight body?

    Low end response-problems are often associated with leaks higher up the tube - meaning that if you have a leak, the upper notes (say from G1 up) can sometimes be blown through even if there is a leak. But the further down you play, the more difficult it becomes if you have a leak. In addition to a leak-light, you may want to find a well-lighted spot and watch each mechanism as you finger the notes . . . make sure everything is closing tightly when it should (G#, bis Bb, forked Bb fingerings, octave mechanisms especially where they switch from lower to upper - A2, etc.).

    True, your problems may well be your own OR a mouthpiece that isn't shoved onto the cork far enough. For me, on all of my sopranos (vintage, modern, straight, curved) my mouthpieces are right at the bottom of the cork or close to it. AND, I've found that a more open mouthpiece with a softer reed works best. But then again, I've been playing soprano for over 55 years. DAVE
    Dave

  5. #45

    Default Re: Soprano sax - curved or straight body?

    I saw Captain Beefheart during the Shiny Beast tour play at the 2nd Fret. Really into it that night, and after the encore he announces "Now we'll play the real stuff." and he jams his straight stick straight down on the mike. And the dear captain wailed without restraint. Heroic really. Anyway, it had to be straight for that. Also like the way Wayne, Trane and Sydney look with a straight piece.

  6. #46
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    Rennie's Avatar
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    Default

    I used to think the curvy's were the cutest looking. But then fate dealt me a straight SML which plays lovely. That's how it goes in life: I will now insist that straight soprano's are the best ones.

    It might be my coming from playing oboe in my teens that I have no problems holding a straight soprano - and I don't use a strap.

  7. #47
    Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru milandro's Avatar
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    Default Re: Soprano sax - curved or straight body?

    well, its not the length or shape of you instrument .........is what you do with it!

  8. #48
    Forum Contributor 2011 Sterling Archer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Soprano sax - curved or straight body?

    The local tech played the horn. No issues. Guess my gurgle is operator error. I'll order a bit softer reed and tinker with the embouchure.

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by HornForHire View Post
    I've got a Yanagisawa soprano with two necks, a straight one and a slightly curved one.
    I prefer the curved one, it sounds just a little bit 'warmer' and the position feels more natural 'cause I'm used to playing tenor.
    Same experience with a pmauriat.

  10. #50

    Default Re: Soprano sax - curved or straight body?

    Quote Originally Posted by patmiller View Post
    As well as the better hearing scenario, straight sops get heavy to hold, even with a strap. Unusual to go to soprano for your first sax, they are a bit more of a challenge in terms of intonation than their bigger relatives. The only drawback of a curvy in my opinion is that it feels like playing a christmas tree ornament.
    I agree with you totally. I am a late bloomer tenor player, and needed a sporano to be able to play a super arrangement our band has of Lullaby of Birdland. A local dealer loaned me one of each for the weekend.

    I found the straight soprano heavy after a short while, and the playing angle is crucial, otherwise it starts to "burble". The curved soprano looks a little gimmicky, people think it is a toy! But I found that ín section playing I could hear myself a lot better (and so correct my intonation) with the curved model.

    Also, to my ear the curved soprano sounds more like a saxophone than the straight "snake charmer" model.
    Playing a soprano, any soprano, in tune seems to be quite a challenge even for experienced players.
    Iain
    Yamaha Custom Z (black lacquer) Otto Link 7 mp. Legere Studio Cut #3 reed.

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