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Thread: Production years for YTS 52

  1. #1
    Forum Contributor 2007 Freeblowing's Avatar
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    Default Production years for YTS 52

    Hello,
    Does anyone know when Yamaha first came out with the Model 52 tenor, and how long it was made? Did they make 52's and 62's at the same time or did the 62's replace the 52 models?
    THNX!
    Lee

  2. #2
    Anonymous
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    I'm going on ancient memory here so I'm sure there are more accurate answers to be had out there.

    I bought a YTS-52 back around 1976 I think. And the top end horn was the YTS-61. That 61 is what was replaced by the YTS-62. My YTS-52 had a wonderful tone and the only reason I upgraded to a 62 was that the action was a little better and it had some articulated keys I needed that my 52 didn't have. I absolutely love my old 62 and I've never tried a tenor that made me want to sell it.

    As far as I know they still make the 52 - I know it was made for long time with the 62 as the higher end model and then the custom came along above that.

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    Distinguished SOTW Member and Forum Contributor 2007 Morry's Avatar
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    My understanding is that the 52 is now replaced by the 475.
    JK SX90R Gold Lacquer over Nickel Alto
    JK SX90R Clear Lacquer Tenor

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  4. #4
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    You're probably right but they do funny things. Like in Australia/New Zealand you cannot buy a YBS-52, only a YBS-32 or 62 ... but the 52 bari is still available here in the US and Canada (I think).

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    Distinguished SOTW Member and Forum Contributor 2007 Morry's Avatar
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    Blaine...that's a pretty big commute you've got - NZ and SF.
    JK SX90R Gold Lacquer over Nickel Alto
    JK SX90R Clear Lacquer Tenor

    Current band:
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    Take the Way-Back Machine to the 80's:
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  6. #6
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    You aint kiddin'!

    I spent the last year in New Zealand and I'm in the Bay Area now waiting for Immigration to process my application to go back and live in NZ (but they have made it clear that they plan to tell me to "bugger orf"). Meanwhile my band (in NZ) is touring the South Island without me - waahh!

  7. #7
    Distinguished SOTW Member and Forum Contributor 2007 Morry's Avatar
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    Do you play full time, or are you there for other work? I've always wondered what the high tech job market was like in NZ and AU.
    JK SX90R Gold Lacquer over Nickel Alto
    JK SX90R Clear Lacquer Tenor

    Current band:
    www.horndogsband.com
    www.facebook.com/horndogsband
    www.myspace.com/horndogsband

    Take the Way-Back Machine to the 80's:
    www.myspace.com/cornerstonebandmusic

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    There is demand for high tech (I got contacted nearly every week with IT offers) but it is nearly impossible to get. You have to have a work permit to get a job offer and you cannot get a work visa without a job offer. It takes about 3 months after you get the offer before you will get the work permit and most IT jobs are 3-6 week contracts that want you to start yesterday. Even if you managed to get the permit and a contract, you would then need to go through the whole 3 month work permit process all over again for the next 3 week contract -- no employer is willing to wait for that - so they will only hire people with a permit to start work immediately. A real catch-22. If you can find a company willing to offer you 2-3 years work then they are usually willing to wait for the work visa and you can even work towards residence. But you'll make less than half what you'd make in the USA and cost of living is very high - so you'd have to love it (and I do) enough to put up with that.

    I'm just there playing music for the love of music and not trying to make any money. If you want to know more - contact me offline so we don't pollute this thread too much.

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    Default Value of American made Yamaha vs Japanese

    Hello Again,
    Thanks for the information about IT work in NZ. It's hard enough for some of us to find IT work here in the states. I guess I won't be going to NZ to find a job.
    ...........getting back to our Yamaha discussion: do you think there is a difference in value between a (Yamaha) horn made here in the states and one made in Japan? I would think the American made horn would cost more to manufacture, so it would have a higher retail price, but what about value of used horns?
    I am thinking of buying a good used YTS 52, and am wondering what the price range for a nice one would be.
    Thanks again
    Lee

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    I'm not sure about the Japanese made vs. American made Yamaha. When I bought my Yamaha's they were only made in Japan.

    I am always amazed at how cheap a 62 horn can be had used. I haven't priced the 52 tenor used - but I don't think there is any better value out there than a used 62.

    Looks like YTS-52 horns have been going on ebay for about $999

    I bet you could find a used YTS-62 for $1200 -- new ones go for $1800 on ebay.

    The 52 is a great sounding horn as I recall from the one I owned 28 years ago -- but I really wanted the "Selmer like" octave key for my thumb and back then the 52 didn't have it (I don't know about today - it probably does).

  11. #11
    Distinguished SOTW Member and Forum Contributor 2007 Morry's Avatar
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    You can get a 62II right now on ebay for $1579. I wouldn't look at a used horn for that little price difference.
    JK SX90R Gold Lacquer over Nickel Alto
    JK SX90R Clear Lacquer Tenor

    Current band:
    www.horndogsband.com
    www.facebook.com/horndogsband
    www.myspace.com/horndogsband

    Take the Way-Back Machine to the 80's:
    www.myspace.com/cornerstonebandmusic

  12. #12
    Forum Contributor 2007 Freeblowing's Avatar
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    Default Yamaha Tenor prices

    Morry,
    That $1579 price on a 62II was for an alto right?
    The best price that I found for a new 62II tenor was $1800. Let me know if you know of a better price.
    I am somewhat reluctant to pay out $1000 for a used horn, off of E-Bay, that I didn't play or see, so I might be more inclined to buy a new one. That silver 62II tenor looks spectacular. The best price I found for the silver tenor was $1999. ( Gulp, some us IT contractors just don't know how long our present gig will last.... )
    Lee

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    Morry........... Ive heard you express how much you like the 80's version 62's. Would you prefer one of those over a new 62II. I'm curious to hear from someone who has tried both. Please, I'd welcome a response from anyone else who has tried both also. Thanks greatly.

  14. #14
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    This doesn't shed any light on the 52 specifically but it did clear up some things for me about what horns are made in the USA and how much of the mfg is done here (just the assembly and only on certain models it turns out).

    I asked Yamaha and here is their response:

    Thank you for your inquiry. We have been producing some of the saxophones here since 1972. Our factory in Grand Rapids, MI makes the 23 series, the 475 series, and the 575 series (Allegro model). The 62II and higher series (incl. 82Z and 875) are made in Hamamatsu, Japan.

    We use a 'A' on our SKU numbers, but many of the products to not have that stamped in as the model number. This is because we do not actually stamp and make the parts here, rather just assemble the instruments here and lacquer them. But, we as the European manufacturers have to say things like 'Assembled in USA' or 'Assembled in Japan' 'Product of Japan' things like that. I have not looked at the back of a YAS-23 alto sax for a while and cannot remember what it actually says. But, the 23, 475 and 575 are stamped in Japan and assembled here while the 62II, 82Z and 875 are fully done in Japan. Also, all bari saxes are produced in Japan.

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    Blaine,

    Thanks for posting the reply from Yamaha. This is essentially what I had understood, although you provided some info that I hadn't known before, such as the possibility that some US-assembled saxes may not have "A" stamped on them.

    It does seem safe to assume, perhaps, that any Yamaha sax that is stamped with an "A" was indeed assembled in the US. If so, then there was a time when professional saxes were assembled in the US, since both of the YAS-61s that I have owned had an "A" after the serial number.

    Also, I have never personally seen a Yamaha sax that did not have "Japan" stamped by the serial number, whether or not there was an "A" in the number. This must be because the parts were made in Japan regardless of the point of assembly.

    Thanks again for the info.

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