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Thread: Ten Albums That Made A Difference

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    Default Ten Albums That Made A Difference

    Having checked through the threads and archives, I couldn't find this topic, so here goes.

    What are the ten albums that made a difference for you as a player?

    What where the albums that made you pick up a sax for the first time, took off the top of your head every time you heard it, and stays on your CD player to this day?

    Here are mine (in no particular order).

    -John Coltrane: A Love Supreme (Impulse)
    -Little Richard: Here’s Little Richard (Specialty Records SP 100) –Lee Allen, the king of Rock N’ Roll sax with incredible, hard driving solos to match the incendiary vocals of Little Richard
    -Red Prysock: Rock And Roll (LP Mercury 20088): includes the immortal solo Handclappin'
    -Sonny Rollins: Saxophone Colossus (Prestige)
    -The Coasters: Greatest Hits (Atco LP 33-111 Stereo SD33-111 Vinyl)- King Curtis is featured on tenor, including his seminal solos on Yakety Yak and Charlie Brown
    -Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Bud Powell, Charles Mingus, and Max Roach: The Quintet: Jazz at Massey Hall (Fantasy/OJC)
    -Dave Brubeck: Time Out (Columbia)- Paul Desmond on alto. The first jazz album to sell over a million copies.
    -Stan Getz: Bossa Nova- with Antonio Carlos Jobim, and Astrud Gilberto (Uni/Verve)
    -Junior Walker & the All Stars: Live (LP Soul 725)
    -Joe Lovano Quartets: Live at the Village Vanguard (Blue Note 1994)

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    Intriguing question! And a chance to reminisce.... Let's see:

    - Alvin Queen, "Ashanti": the first jazz album I ever owned, purchased for me by my mom, who knew nothing about jazz and still doesn't... It's got the criminally underrated James Spaulding on alto, and I keep pulling that LP (yes, LP!) out not just for nostalgia's sake.

    - Art Tatum: can't remember the title of the album off the top of my head right now, but it's a volume in the Tatum Masterpiece series, issued by Pablo, the second volume of the session with Benny Carter and Louie Bellson. It was the first jazz record I bought with my own money. Little did I know then that ANY money spent on a Benny Carter recording will return its initial investment again and again and again, only in sheer joy.

    - Miles Davis, "Kinds of Blue": 'nuff said.

    - Spider Murphy Gang, "Dolce Vita": uhm, don't ask -- but that album remains a guilty pleasure of mine after all these years.

    - Sergei Rachmaninov, "Piano Concerto No. 1, Op. 1": yes, no. 1, not 2 that everybody else is gaga over. Sheer beauty. Didn't know then what it was all about -- and just a little more now -- but Rachmaninov, to me, remains a master storyteller.

    - Franco Ambrosetti, "Movies": a wonderful album that I've been listening to at least once a month for the past 15 years or so.

    - Dee Dee Bridgewater, "Live in Paris": DA BOMB! Perhaps the album that made me want to learn about the ins and outs of jazz more than any other.

    - Dexter Gordon, "Our Man in Paris": anything by Long Tall Dexter would do it for me, really, but this is the first one of his I bought.

    - Sonny Criss, "Mr. Blues a porter," and Wardell Gray, "The Wardell Gray Story": two much more recent discoveries to which I'm giving a good, concentrated listening at least once a week. Much like James Spaulding, ***criminally*** underrated the both of them.

    That's it for my formative musical experiences, then and now. Thanks for the trip down Memory Lane, ripitup!

    -j.

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    Miles Davis - Kind of Blue. How could it not have?
    Cannonball Adderley and John Coltrane
    Art Pepper Meets the Rhythm Section
    John Coltrane - Giant Steps
    Charlie Parker Dial Sessions
    Sonny Rollins - Saxophone Collossus
    Dizzie Gillespie, Sonny Stitt and Stan Getz - For Musicians Only
    Wayne Shorter - Speak No Evil
    Freddie Hubbard - Red Clay
    John Coltrane - Blue Train

    The albums that influenced or inspired me the most, probably.

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    oooh. i love top ten lists. here's ten (not necessarily my favorite albums--but there's a few in there) that made me hear things differently:

    1. Kind of Blue (duh)
    2. Sonny Rollins--The Bridge
    3. Dexter Gordon--GO
    4. Pat Metheny--Offramp
    5. John Scofield--Still Warm
    6. Bill Evans--You Must Believe in Spring
    7. John Abercrombie--Timeless
    8. John Coltrane--Crescent
    9. Wayne Shorter--Speak No Evil
    10. Anything with Herbie Hancock

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    -A Love Supreme
    -Blood, Sweat & Tears 3
    -Giant Steps
    -My Favorite Things
    -What is Hip? (Tower of Power)
    -Kind of Blue
    -Funky Kingston (Toots & the Maytals)
    -Sex Machine (James Brown)
    -Burnin' (Bob Marley & the Wailers)
    -Blue Trane
    ...a little less like 'trane, a little more like Miles...

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    Distinguished SOTW Member/Saxophonist Extraordinaire chayjazz's Avatar
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    Let's see...I'll try and list just the ones that specifically effected the way I play saxophone.

    Cannoball Adderley: Portrait Of Cannonball
    Sonny Stitt: Personal Apperance
    Charlie Parker: Now's The Time
    David Sanborn: Hide Away
    Steps: Smokin In The Pit
    Chick Corea: 3 Quartets
    Mile Davis: Kind Of Blue
    Miles Davis: Milestone
    Phill Woods: 'More' Live
    John Coltrane: Blue Trane

    man..this could easily be a very long list...

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    The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum Contributor 2014 gary's Avatar
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    This is not a list of broad musical enfluences but only those recordings I think had a very direct link on my playing. Limiting to ten really doesn’t paint a complete picture, (my first list had “November Steps” by Toru Takemitsu, LOL) but the process is pretty instructive anyway. I’m a bit surprised at the value of doing it. Thanks. They are, in priority…

    Kind of Blue (Miles, et al) (specifically “So What”)
    Olé (John Coltrane)
    Live at the Golden Circle (Ornette)
    Manhatten Symphonie (Dex)
    East Broadway Rundown (Sonny Rollins)
    Art Pepper Meets the Rhythm Section
    Concert at Massey Hall (“Perdido”)
    Jazz at Oberlin (Desmond/Brubeck) (Desmond on“How High the Moon”)
    The Bix Beiderbecke Story, Bix and Tram, vol. 2 (Bix on “I’m Comin’ Virginia”)
    Peter Gunn (orig. sound track)

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    Well, these are the ones that have had the biggest affect on me since 7th grade. This isn't to say these are jazz classics in the least but this was my progression.
    1. Chuck Mangione "Live at the Hollywood Bowl" First jazz album . My parents had it. I wore that album out listening to Chris Vadala play.

    2. Spyro Gyra "Morning Dance" Again I wore this album out. My band director at the time gave me a tape of it.

    3. Dave Sanborn "Voyeur" I don't remember where I got it but I played it everyday for about 6 months in high school.

    4. Phil Woods- I don't remeber the album but it had "The Summer Knows on it" "Musique Du Bois?? I got this out of the library and loved Phil's sound.

    5.Steps Ahead- I got to college and within a week was told I was clueless because I didn't know who Brecker was. I got the first Steps album and then became obssessed with Brecker and bought every album I could find of his and started playing tenor.


    To be continued.........

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    Forum Contributor 2009 JimD's Avatar
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    Africa Brass - Coltrane
    Coltrane
    Chappaqua Suite - Ornette Coleman
    Kind of Blue - Miles
    Sorceror - Miles
    Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus - Mingus
    Mingus Ah Um

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    Professional Musician Vortex's Avatar
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    In no particular order:

    Miles Davis - Kind of Blue
    John Coltrane - Giant Steps
    Cannonball Adderley - Somethin Else
    Freddie Hubbard - Sky Dive
    Michael Brecker - Wide Angles
    Greg Osby - Inner Circle
    Greg Osby - Symbols of Light
    Cannonball Adderley - Live in San Francisco
    David Sanborn - Voyeur
    The Waterboys - A Girl Called Johnny (the song, not album)
    A good sound comes from within. Long live jazz!
    V0l2TEX

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    The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum Contributor 2014 gary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nefertiti
    4. Phil Woods- I don't remeber the album but it had "The Summer Knows on it"...
    Nefertiti - if you ever want to find it again, it was on the album "Images". Beautiful album with Michael LeGrande.

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    Distinguished SOTW Member -TH's Avatar
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    Here's my list.. :

    Oliver Nelson : "The Blues and The Abstract truth"
    Kenny Garrett : "The Pursuance"
    Phil Woods : "Alive and well in Paris"
    Stan Getz : "Anniversary"
    Kenny Garrett : "Songbook"
    Cannonball Adderley : "African Waltz"
    Zoot Sims : "Zoot Sims and the Gershwin Brothers"
    Henry Threadgill : "Where's your cup?"
    Donald Harrison : "Nouveau Swing"
    John Coltrane : "Crescent"

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    "Time Out" - Brubeck Quartet
    "Giant Steps" - 'Trane
    "Images" - Phil Woods (after a jazz clinic I took with him as a high schooler (it also has a really interesting version of "Claire de Lune" on it))
    "Chameleon" - Maynard Ferguson
    "Headhunter" - Herbie
    "Overnight Sensation" - Zappa
    "Dark Side of the Moon" - Pink Floyd
    "Getz/Gilberto" - Getz, Jobim
    "Captain Marvel" - Getz
    "Saxophone Collosus" - Sonny

    (yeah, I'm a child of the 60s who came into musical consciousness in the 70s!)

  14. #14

    Default Some of my top favs...

    Wynton Marsalis - Standard Time Vol. 1
    Maynard Ferguson - High Voltage
    Phil Driscoll - I Exalt Thee
    Freddie Hubbard - Backlash
    Dizzy Gillespie, Sonny Stitt, Sonny Rollins - On the Sunny Side of the Street
    John Coltrane - Ballads
    Tower of Power - East Bay Grease
    Dizzy Gillespie Big Band - pick your recording!
    Wayne Shorter - See No Evil
    Freddie Hubbard - Red Clay

    Yeah, I started off as a trumpet player.

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    Forum Contributor 2009 cleger's Avatar
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    I have only been listening to jazz for a relatively short period of time and have been playing even less, so my list will be a little different:

    1. Charles Mingus - Live at Antibes
    2. Vandermark 5 - Elements of Style (especially the bonus Rahsaan disk)
    3. Rahsaan Roland Kirk - Rip Rig and Panic
    4. Ellery Eskelin - Arcanum Moderne
    5. Wayne Shorter - Speak no Evil
    6. John Coltrane - Giant Steps
    7. Miles Davis - Miles Smiles
    8. Anthony Braxton - Quartet Dortmund 1976
    9. John Coltrane - Crescent
    10. Miles Davis - Kind of Blue
    "If it ain't fun, I want no part of it, man. That's the only reason I play." - Phil Woods

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    Distinguished SOTW Member Dr G's Avatar
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    No album names now but the players during my formative years were:

    Chicago Transit Authority
    Cold Blood
    John Klemmer
    Boots Randolf
    Blood, Sweat, and Tears
    Maynard Ferguson
    Don Ellis
    White Elephant
    Cannonball Adderly
    Go for The Tone,

    g



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    Quote Originally Posted by Nefertiti
    4. Phil Woods- I don't remeber the album but it had "The Summer Knows on it" "Musique Du Bois?? I got this out of the library and loved Phil's sound.
    It is indeed Musique du Bois, originally released on Muse with Jaki Byard, Richard Davis, and Alan Dawson. Terrific album, and one I was way into at the time it came out too, though I eventually became less enamored of Phil's style.

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    In terms of things that I thought were outstanding at the time and still kill me all these years later - a couple of Jackie McLean albums stand out

    1) Jacknife double LP on Blue Note (half of it's out on a Blue Note Conn. CD)

    2) Destination Out

    and

    3) Archie Shepp - Four for Trane

    4) Charlie Parker at Carnegie Hall 1949 ("All the Things You Are")

    5) Marion Brown Quartet on ESP

    6) John Coltrane and Rashied Ali - Interstellar Space

    7) OhmygodhowcouldIforget: Tony Williams - Lifetime (Blue Note) (and I could add "Spring" too but then I'd have to delete something else)

    8) Gerry Niewood - Slow Hot Wind on A&M (one alto solo on there in particular)

    9) A bunch of Ed Wilkerson tenor solos on 8 Bold Souls CDs

    10) Johnny Hodges' version of Tenderly

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    Quote Originally Posted by -TH
    Here's my list.. :

    Oliver Nelson : "The Blues and The Abstract truth"
    ...
    Forgot that one too, oh well, I've already listed 10!

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    Distinguished SOTW Member Dr G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Sharpe
    What are the ten albums that made a difference for you as a player?

    -Joe Lovano Quartets: Live at the Village Vanguard (Blue Note 1994)
    Nice thread, Neil. I have to wonder at the responses that I've seen so far. It would be interesting to have people add the year that they started playing. I agree that Lovano's recording that you note is great stuff and that it influences me NOW. I started playing in the late '60's and didn't have the opportunities to hear most of what I've seen people cite.
    Go for The Tone,

    g



    As a veteran for peace, I am already against the next war.

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