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devinmac2k08
04-12-2006, 02:04 AM
Hey, I'm going to be a HS junior next year at my school and my lessons teacher has already given me my solo to work up for competition. He gave me the Caprice En Forme De Valse. Ive managed other difficult stuff before, but this one seems way more of a challenge technical-wise than i can manage right now. ive got months (till next feb) to work this up; those of you have played this, do you have any suggestions on getting this piece to work for me?

srcsax
04-12-2006, 02:17 AM
Pull out your metronome and learn this piece sowly. Try to keep the Waltz feel going before you get into the rubato style. It will be better sense to you to do this. Slow discipline before fast notes. Get each section under your fingers. Think about where you are going to phrase/breath and mark them in. Never feel worried about writing all over a piece of music! Check out some recordings. Mule and Jamal Rossi come to mind as good examples to listen to.

Wallace
04-12-2006, 04:14 AM
Try to keep the Waltz feel going before you get into the rubato style. .

Great advice.

I would also reccommend Michael Hester's recording of the work on his CD "Seasons".

http://www.towerrecords.com/product.aspx?pfid=2835738&title=Seasons+%2f+Michael+Hester%2c+Saxophone

J.Max
04-12-2006, 02:10 PM
Both excellent pieces of advice...Hester's recording is great, BTW.

Remember...not all pieces can be learned in a month...sometimes, you have to stick with something for a long time. But the good news is that after you learn a difficult piece it should elevate your abilities.

sinkdraiN
04-12-2006, 03:39 PM
Man, that is an excellent piece...but VERY challenging. I worked it up for my college senior recital.

This makes me want to pull it up and play it again...hmmm, maybe I shouldn't

J.Max
04-12-2006, 05:42 PM
Man, that is an excellent piece...but VERY challenging. I worked it up for my college senior recital.

This makes me want to pull it up and play it again...hmmm, maybe I shouldn't


I played it once on a studio recital. Tough piece. Makes me want to pull it out again...

srcsax
04-12-2006, 06:09 PM
For a change of pace on this gem, When i was i Paris i picked up Duex Caripces. Some piece, but with an added movement and with harp accompament

robosax
04-12-2006, 11:41 PM
This is one of my all time favorite pieces!

The Michael Hester version is sick! I think he's an alien.

Check out the Todd Oxford version (on bari) for an interpretation that can be played by us humans ;)

J.Max
04-13-2006, 12:35 AM
This is one of my all time favorite pieces!

The Michael Hester version is sick! I think he's an alien.

Check out the Todd Oxford version (on bari) for an interpretation that can be played by us humans ;)


Michael Hester is quite human, but he has had his fingers replaced with bionic implants. I've been to his house and I have seen him eat earth food, so he MUST be human...

baritone
04-13-2006, 01:13 AM
just wonder, fingering speed, does it relate more to mental or to physical?

J.Max
04-13-2006, 01:21 AM
just wonder, fingering speed, does it relate more to mental or to physical?


I don't know. I think it's a combination of both. Certainly, if you take someone who has trained their fingers to play certain notes, they have to have the physical ability to move them quickly. Then again, if you can't connect the notes with the keys mentally, you won't be able to play as fast either...

Rackety Sax
04-13-2006, 01:25 AM
This piece has been recorded a lot and really lends itself to individual interpretation. Harvey Pittel and Al Gallodoro are others who come to mind who have recorded it.

robosax
04-13-2006, 02:14 AM
Michael Hester is quite human, but he has had his fingers replaced with bionic implants. ...
That explains it. Boy, can he play! Are you sure he's not half/god like Hercules? ;)

srcsax
04-13-2006, 02:16 AM
When you practice slowly and then build up speed you are developing digital memory. It's mental and physical. You need to develope the muscles physically, the fingers develop memory. Do you think about playing a scale you have known for years? Not realy because you have developed digital memory. Do you think "how do i put food on a fork and then put it in my mouth?" No, because repetition has taught you how to do that effortlessly.

As James Moody says - "A wise man practices slowly, A wiser man will practice even slower"

Mark
04-13-2006, 04:39 AM
When you practice slowly and then build up speed you are developing digital memory. It's mental and physical. You need to develope the muscles physically, the fingers develop memory. Do you think about playing a scale you have known for years? Not realy because you have developed digital memory. Do you think "how do i put food on a fork and then put it in my mouth?" No, because repetition has taught you how to do that effortlessly.

As James Moody says - "A wise man practices slowly, A wiser man will practice even slower"

If anyone here knows some of Frank Zappa's more challenging pieces, here's how he made them happen: for his last touring band in 1988 the group rehearsed for four months(!), five days a week, 8 to 10 hours per day! They had to learn over 100 tunes to be played without sheet music on stage, and Frank wanted them to be able to play strictly by muscle memory if need be, since road work like that can make one tired / sick, etc. and he needed them to able to play his stuff no matter where their head was at.

One of the sax players was asked how they played so well, and he said "we were over-rehearsed!". Listen to some of the recordings from that tour to hear one very tight 5-piece section doing some very challenging stuff!

Oh, and when he was trying to get an orchestra to play some of his music, they complained that it was "too hard". His reply? "My "rock" band can play this stuff. And they do so without sheet music in front of them, and often with choreography!"

devinmac2k08
04-14-2006, 02:22 AM
My question answered, some wise words of wisdom, AND related subjects. what more could you ask for? :) Mucho Thanks

baritone
04-14-2006, 11:05 AM
thx!!! Rome is not built in one day.

AMASAX
04-14-2006, 11:02 PM
btw, there is a typo, on page 3, i believe, check it out, get the correction. Don't know where my copy of this is to be more specific.

robosax
04-16-2006, 12:10 AM
btw, there is a typo, on page 3, i believe, check it out, get the correction. Don't know where my copy of this is to be more specific.
AMASAX... are you going to let us in on the typo?

My printing looks alright. Though I'm not sure. I hope I haven't been playing it wrong for the last 20 years... doh!

thanx,

Agent27
04-16-2006, 06:15 AM
When you practice slowly and then build up speed you are developing digital memory. It's mental and physical. You need to develope the muscles physically, the fingers develop memory. Do you think about playing a scale you have known for years? Not realy because you have developed digital memory. Do you think "how do i put food on a fork and then put it in my mouth?" No, because repetition has taught you how to do that effortlessly.

Somebody's been reading Effortless Mastery. :D

srcsax
04-16-2006, 03:53 PM
I read Effortless Mastery several years ago. I do belive in some of the thoughts the book emparts.

When it coems down to it, does perfect practive make perfect performance on some level anyway?

All too many things in life, be it a classical sax piece, a jazz tune or a major task at work go wrong not because of a lack of knowledge but by a lack of proper preperation.