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hellas
09-13-2005, 04:35 AM
I'm in Hong Kong and the only Selmer I can buy are Series II, Series III, Aristocrat AS600 & Selmer Omega. I know that Aristocrat are made in Taiwan and both Series II & III are made in Paris, so, where's Selmer Omega manufactured? I cannot found any information about Omega via Selmer website. Thanks!

Dave dix
09-13-2005, 06:16 AM
Taiwan made
Dave

Riff
09-13-2005, 01:30 PM
I don't believe Selmer still makes the Omega. It was discontinued years ago. If I'm right you must be looking at a used sax that was made in the U.S. (or maybe a new one that has been in dealer stock for a decade or more.)
The Omega name was dropped when the AS-100 came out. There were some minor differences in the design but otherwise it was the same sax as the Omega with a different name.

The AS-100 was later upgraded to the AS-110. In just the last year the AS-110 was discontinued and replaced with the La Voix AS-220. These are being made in Taiwan as Dave said.

Some dealers in the States continued to refer to the AS-100, and later the AS-110 as the Omega even though this was not its official name. This caused some confusion as to what sax you were looking at. Verify exactly what sax the store has.

The Omega, and its two descendents, were fairly decent saxes although they were not quite up to the Selmer Paris standards. The new La Voix models are getting good reviews so far but are probably similar in quality to other saxes coming out of Taiwan.

hellas
09-13-2005, 03:42 PM
I've checked the Omega saxophone in the Parsons music shop (http://www.parsonsmusic.com/www/index.php), it's a brand new saxophone with a logo "Selmer Omega" engraved on the bell. So, I think it should be old stock. Here're are the descriptions provided by the music store:

<OMEGA - MG296>
The exclusive line of Selmer and Bach Omega instruments is available only through select authorized dealers. Omega instruments bear the long tradition for quality and craftsmanship.

‧ Sterling silver head-body-foot tubing
‧ Gold-plated nickel silver key mechanism
‧ French (open hole) design
‧ Primo cut head joint
‧ B foot
‧ Gizmo key
‧ Engraved gold-plated lip plate
‧ Gold-plated crown

Thus, according to Riff's comments, all Selmer Omega, AS-100, AS-110 and AS-220 are made in Taiwan? And that's why their selling price just half of Selmer Paris Series II?

saxmanglen
09-13-2005, 03:58 PM
That description sounds like a flute.........

Saxmusiclover
09-14-2005, 07:00 AM
I've checked the Omega saxophone in the Parsons music shop (http://www.parsonsmusic.com/www/index.php), it's a brand new saxophone with a logo "Selmer Omega" engraved on the bell. So, I think it should be old stock. Here're are the descriptions provided by the music store:

<OMEGA - MG296>
The exclusive line of Selmer and Bach Omega instruments is available only through select authorized dealers. Omega instruments bear the long tradition for quality and craftsmanship.

‧ Sterling silver head-body-foot tubing
‧ Gold-plated nickel silver key mechanism
‧ French (open hole) design
‧ Primo cut head joint

‧ B foot
‧ Gizmo key
‧ Engraved gold-plated lip plate
‧ Gold-plated crown

Thus, according to Riff's comments, all Selmer Omega, AS-100, AS-110 and AS-220 are made in Taiwan? And that's why their selling price just half of Selmer Paris Series II?

Hey Hellas,
I'm from Hong Kong and I use to go Parsons a lot. For what it's worth my impression is that while they have excellent choices in pianos and keyboards, their woodwind collection leaves a lot to be desired. The last time I was there a few months ago the only item worth looking at was a Leblanc clarinet. They only had a few saxes and all were made in China.

bruce bailey
09-14-2005, 07:01 AM
That would be the overpriced flute specs. The AS-100 was a pretty nice horn and came out at the same time the VII was introduced and at the time some Selmer reps claimed it was the old VI tooling which it DOES look a lot like. These are kind of sleeper horns but are creeping up in price lately. I have a feeling that the Omega we are talking about is a US horn that was dolled up a bit.

Riff
09-14-2005, 01:11 PM
Thus, according to Riff's comments, all Selmer Omega, AS-100, AS-110 and AS-220 are made in Taiwan?

That's not what I said.
I said the Omega, AS-100, & AS 110 were all made in the U.S. and they are all discontinued models.

The La Voix line of saxes are the newest models and they are made in Taiwan. The model number for the La Voix alto sax is AS-220.

If your dealer has a new Omega in the store, it has most likely been sitting there for 20 years.

Brendan Muse
09-14-2005, 08:36 PM
I had a friend who played on an Omega. They're pretty good horns. He played all four years in high school, and I imagine he's using it in college.

Now, it's not a top-of-the-line horn, but it doesn't have a top-of-the-line price, either, so you would really come out ahead.

1saxman
09-28-2005, 02:46 AM
No, no, no. 'Omega' is a new Selmer USA line with no connection to the Model 162 'Omega' alto sax of 1980 (which was a heck of a sax). Those altos did not have 'Omega' or Model 162 on them anywhere - just Selmer USA. The tenor which came out a couple years later was the Model 164. Serial numbers for these are in the 820xxx to 823xxx range. The horns were eventually called the 100 series (AS100, TS100). These numbers go higher, but still in the 82xxxx range. All of these Elkhart-made saxes are decent horns, with build quality getting worse as you go up. The first ones (like my 821009 alto) were all hand-soldered like the Paris horns. Later, they used induction-soldering, and sometimes the key fitments aren't that precise - like a side key cup will just barely cover the tone hole, for example. You will find some nice examples on ebay from time to time for really good prices if you need a back-up sax that looks and feels like a Mk VI.

neehaw
01-13-2006, 03:50 AM
I'm more than a little late to the party here, but 1saxman is correct - the 1980-1990'ish Model 162 horns do not have any indicated model number, just "Selmer USA" on the bell, nice engraving, and a serial number on the back.

My alto is #826460. The keywork is very good, and the tone, intonation, and reliability are exceptional.

Ricardo
03-10-2006, 03:44 PM
I have a Selmer (US) that was made in 2001 and is called a Standard. It is marked on the bell "Selmer STD II". I called the company in Elkhart and got the impression that it was the unit that replaced the Omega. Any thoughts on this Alto. Ricardo

honkytone
04-22-2006, 07:51 PM
No, no, no. 'Omega' is a new Selmer USA line with no connection to the Model 162 'Omega' alto sax of 1980 (which was a heck of a sax). Those altos did not have 'Omega' or Model 162 on them anywhere - just Selmer USA. The tenor which came out a couple years later was the Model 164. Serial numbers for these are in the 820xxx to 823xxx range. The horns were eventually called the 100 series (AS100, TS100). These numbers go higher, but still in the 82xxxx range. All of these Elkhart-made saxes are decent horns, with build quality getting worse as you go up. The first ones (like my 821009 alto) were all hand-soldered like the Paris horns. Later, they used induction-soldering, and sometimes the key fitments aren't that precise - like a side key cup will just barely cover the tone hole, for example. You will find some nice examples on ebay from time to time for really good prices if you need a back-up sax that looks and feels like a Mk VI.

So where would an 828XXX alto with fancy engraving from top to bottom fall in this scheme? Still a righteous hand-soldered model? Did they start calling and/or stamping them AS100 by this time? What kind of money are they bringing now?

1saxman
05-13-2006, 01:23 PM
Yes, I think a 828xxx would be a AS100. No identifying model name on the sax. A very good, US-made sax. Prices go from $500 to $1200. Considering the alternatives in that range, these horns are hot.

neehaw
05-14-2006, 02:32 PM
Yes, I think a 828xxx would be a AS100. No identifying model name on the sax. A very good, US-made sax. Prices go from $500 to $1200. Considering the alternatives in that range, these horns are hot.

I'd want to see a picture... that serial number isn't that far from my alto's, and mine is definitely a model 162.

stevesklar
05-27-2006, 09:40 PM
I've got an alto 8204xx Omega sitting here if you want pics.

here's a pic of one (not the one i mentioned above)
http://www.saxmaniax.com/Gallery/OmegaAlto.htm

rmp
06-01-2006, 04:40 PM
I've got an alto 8204xx Omega sitting here if you want pics.



Hey, I know that one! Feel free to take/post any pictures Steve, even though I'm sure mine is far from the most beautiful example still out there -

Ryan

EZ
06-04-2006, 12:49 PM
HOW STRANGE!

I'm servicing an alto Omega that's an 8204xx.

What a small world!

DaveKessler
06-05-2006, 06:43 PM
Omega saxes are still offered by Selmer NEW. However, they are the same horn as the La Voix, just made in Brass and deluxe engraved up the body. Specifically, the new Omega's are the IDENTICAL sax to the Antigua Power Bell (same engraving pattern as well).

The Omega line is a "small dealer exclusive" line. Meaning that they are not offered on the internet or to larger dealers who are going to heavily discount them.

rmp
06-05-2006, 06:53 PM
Steve and ez_sax are both talking about my early-mid 80s Selmer USA Pro "Omega" (mine is the Selmer model 162 8204XX alto).

I'm not sure how it ever got the "Omega" moniker, as the words Omega are not to be found on the horn anywhere.

The newer Omegas certainly are very different. Seems to me it's better off to refer to the old Selmer USA Pros simply as 162 or 164s. I have an old Selmer catalog at home from 1990 or so, I can scan it in and post it if anyone is interested.

Ryan

honkytone
06-13-2006, 12:35 AM
Hmm...looks like one of the good ones just sold on eBay:

Selmer Alto Sax (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7421282710)

rmp
06-13-2006, 01:38 AM
well, someone from Japan just bought one of ebay for $1450. Crikey.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7419527800

That's quite a range.

rmp

semipro
06-14-2006, 01:31 PM
RMP,

I would like to see that brochure. I almost bought a Selmer Omega in 1988. The dealer told me it was identical to the Super Action just made in the USA.

rmp
06-14-2006, 02:04 PM
I'll scan it in tonight or tomorrow and post it.

The Omega is not very similar to the SA 80-II - it's a much more simple, basic horn. I had one of each about two years ago, and I decided to keep my Omega and sell the SA80-II (it was my sisters, she didn't play anymore). The SA80-II was very different - clearly more powerful and focused than the Omega, but the Omega felt like home to me, so I kept it instead.

I sold that mint condition SA-II alto for $1500, which was likely WAY too low.

Ryan

semipro
06-15-2006, 12:38 PM
rmp,

It was the original SA that I was told the Omega was equivalent to, not SA-II. Sorry for the misunderstanding. I bought a Yamaha 52 instead. At the time the ergonomics fit me better.

rmp
06-15-2006, 04:20 PM
pics are now here..

http://picasaweb.google.com/rmplum/SelmerUSACatalog#

1saxman
09-26-2006, 04:30 AM
The 162 was never anything like any SA 80. Your music dealer or whatever was wrong, as are most of the comments here on the subject. The alto was advertised as the Omega by Selmer USA when it debuted around 1981, and was listed as the Model 162. The Selmer Paris alto of the time was the Model 52 and the tenor was 54. No Mk VI tooling was used, but Mk VI styling cues were plentiful, and that was obviously the target for this sax. I could scan the hang tag from mine which has 'Omega' and 'Model 162' and show you, maybe tomorrow. Neither 'Omega' nor 'Model 162' was anywhere on the sax. The tenor, Model 164 came out in a couple years and the Mk VI looks were there (the tenor was NOT called the 'Omega'). One big difference was the neck - it was like a SA 80, in the high-arch profile rather than like the Mk VI. All altos and tenors have high F#. I am not certain about how high the numbers went before the change to AS and TS. You have examples of both on both sides of the line; TS100s with serial numbers in the 828xxxs as well as the 1xxxxxx numbers. What I go by is the shape of the RH petals for C and D#, and the lacquer color. Gold lacquer with petals like the Mk VI are 162/164. 'Clear' lacquer and SA 80 petals are AS/TS. The original 'Omega' alto can be told not only by the low serial number (821xxx-822xxx) but also by the Mk VI-style plain bar for the high F#. All later horns had the oval pearl for F# which I always thought was a unique and beautiful touch. Also, all 162s and 164s have a round pearl for high F. AS and TS have the SA 80 teardrop. In addition to my Omega alto, I now have a later 164 tenor that I use with a Mk VI replacement neck. This is a very powerful set-up and suits my R&B gigs to a tee. The only thing wrong with the tenor is it has a slighly weak D. I really haven't looked at it to check for leaks/heights/spring tensions that might affect the D. It really doesn't bother me and I don't think about it when playing (and I don't vent it either). On the alto, I cut about 1/4" off the neck, and I still push the mouthpiece pretty far on the cork. I actually played it for years with a Mk VI neck but eventually went back to the cut-down neck. Anyway, that's my take on the most misunderstood saxes ever made. They were not perfect, but had a lot of soul compared to what you get today, particularly from Asia.

rmp
09-26-2006, 01:49 PM
The original 'Omega' alto can be told not only by the low serial number (821xxx-822xxx) but also by the Mk VI-style plain bar for the high F#. All later horns had the oval pearl for F# which I always thought was a unique and beautiful touch.

One minor correction, the early Omega alto serial numbers start a bit lower (my early Omega horn has the Mark VI-style plain bar F# key) and is 820xxx. I knew a few people who bought the later Omegas and I can confirm the F# key change to the oval pearl.

rmp

stevesklar
10-06-2006, 10:21 PM
for those with better knowledge than myself (which is alot of you) ..... a tenor with a SN of 830xxx .. would this be a TS-100 or a later model ?

It has the engravings and oval high F# pearl, Selmer (C) USA engraved on the bell - just like the other pics.

Is this serial number out of the range of the "Omegas/TS-100" ??

Did selmer still make "TS100"s into 2001 ?? (per some retail store that was trying to sell one)

stevesklar
10-06-2006, 10:26 PM
duh .. 1 saxman has all the info up above ... i just had to read it 3 times !!

lehtonale
02-14-2007, 04:43 AM
I have AS-100, which I bought in 1990 in NYC. That time was a rumor, that some parts of this model were manufactured according to Selmer Mark VI. Do you have any idea about that. Anyway I like my AS-100 and I use it still on the gigs.

bruce bailey
02-14-2007, 07:01 AM
I worked trade shows for flute companies and at the time the Mark VII came out, they started the AS-100. The guys at Selmer claimed it was the VI tooling but I have nothing other than this to confirm. A nice playing horn and at the time it was about 60% of the VII price.

lehtonale
02-14-2007, 05:00 PM
Dear RPM,

Would be interesting to get this material to my email.
Best Regards
Lehtonale

sonnymobleytrane
02-14-2007, 05:21 PM
Taiwan made
Dave

I dont believe these horns were made in Taiwan. I think they were made in Elkhardt,Indiana as a less expensive alternative to the French made super action 80. I remember the ads at the time (mid 1980's) with Richie Cole endorsing these

semipro
02-15-2007, 01:44 AM
Yeah they were USA made I remember thinking I liked the idea of it being a US made horn BETTER than France.

Redwood_Lenny
02-15-2007, 03:35 AM
I have an early USA (Omega) SN: 8200xx. I'm the original owner and I will be this horn's last owner. :D

I love the sound and feel of this horn. The sound is very solid at the core and the horn plays well into the altissimo range. I think that some of these horns were extremely good values. I don't know how they stack up against the "big boys", but for the money...

Stacey
02-17-2007, 05:50 AM
Steve and ez_sax are both talking about my early-mid 80s Selmer USA Pro "Omega" (mine is the Selmer model 162 8204XX alto).

I'm not sure how it ever got the "Omega" moniker, as the words Omega are not to be found on the horn anywhere.

Ryan

Ryan,

I don't know HOW it got that name, but I do know that even back at the time (early 80s) they had the moniker Omega, whether it appeared on the horn or not. I remember back in the very early 80s when I was shopping for a new horn (I ended up with a new MK7), I also had a subscription to Downbeat magazine, and there was often an ad featuring Ritchie Cole pitching the Selmer Omega (described as the Omega in the ad).

Stacey

stevesklar
02-17-2007, 12:51 PM
I have AS-100, which I bought in 1990 in NYC. That time was a rumor, that some parts of this model were manufactured according to Selmer Mark VI. Do you have any idea about that. Anyway I like my AS-100 and I use it still on the gigs.

I don't know if they used the "tooling", I thought it was a copy. BUT if you ever need new parts for your VI or VII the AS/TS-100 parts are a good cheap alternative (some minor modifications may be needed). Selmer USA stopped production of that model about 5 years ago.

hodges1
05-17-2007, 04:52 AM
I have one of the 100s. I think each person's opinion will vary. I think they stand very substantial ground with the top models out there. I have been doing a comparison over the past few months between this and a 62 and have had some interesting results. I actually like the sound of the 100 better, even though the mechanics may be a little slower. I have had a very difficult time deciding which one to keep. I can live with mechanics being a little slower. I have leaned towards possibly parting with the 62 because sound is more important to me than speed of action. I can adjust my fingers easily to move faster. I did a poll and the majority seemed to dis-agree with me. I spend 90% of my time with the 100 and 10% of my time now with the 62 and an getting a superior sound out of the 100. If I asked a group of people I may get different responses.

saxandstrings86
05-31-2007, 11:26 PM
Sorry for my two cents, but I jsut want to point out how confusing the Selmer USA lines can get at times...almost like Yamaha and the occasional changes to models or serial numbers.

I've got a Bach Omega trumpet that belonged to a friend of mine, and I've taken some time to see the differences between that and the Bach Strad 180s trumpet (stay with me for a sec, I promise)

Same #37 bell flair and lead pipe (or at least very similar), valve casings of the TR-200 int. model, and no extra bracings on the tuning slide/lead pipe. Many high end features, such as the third valve slide ring, the trim pieces, first valve saddle, silver plate, all of which are standard on the TR-180s (intro pro line).

Basically, it's an intermediate horn, with pro features, but more durable. It was built in 1994 (from what I can gather), and Bach only used the Omega name for a few years with these horns, and a trombone (similar to the Bach Strad 36B). I'm thinking that for a while, the woodwinds were probably the same boat, compared to some pro Selmer USA horn, but they've used it in enough contexts to jsut be confusing now...kinda like the Selmer/Bach 'Soloist' Model horns a couple of years back.

lehtonale
09-15-2007, 08:14 AM
No, no, no. 'Omega' is a new Selmer USA line with no connection to the Model 162 'Omega' alto sax of 1980 (which was a heck of a sax). Those altos did not have 'Omega' or Model 162 on them anywhere - just Selmer USA. The tenor which came out a couple years later was the Model 164. Serial numbers for these are in the 820xxx to 823xxx range. The horns were eventually called the 100 series (AS100, TS100). These numbers go higher, but still in the 82xxxx range. All of these Elkhart-made saxes are decent horns, with build quality getting worse as you go up. The first ones (like my 821009 alto) were all hand-soldered like the Paris horns. Later, they used induction-soldering, and sometimes the key fitments aren't that precise - like a side key cup will just barely cover the tone hole, for example. You will find some nice examples on ebay from time to time for really good prices if you need a back-up sax that looks and feels like a Mk VI.

You know the history of AS-100 and AS-110. My altos manufacturing number is 825xxx. Is it 100 or 110? Thank you.

ShedShark
09-16-2007, 03:04 AM
825xxx is the early Selmer usa. It's a 162 and a much higher quality than the later ones (1,xxx,xxx series).

sax1313
02-15-2009, 11:07 AM
and this is what the old selmer omega looks like.
(this one is a 820xxx ser. nr.)
(i might add better pictures later on! ;-) )

Skoothondjie
02-23-2009, 02:22 PM
hi everyone. i bought a secondhand alto sax a week ago, hardly played on, without a dent or scratch. the previous owner payed R8000 [south african rand] (around $800) for it and i got away with R5000 (around $500). $500 was, unfortunately, the absolute maximum that i could afford. i imagine it to be an advanced student or intermediate sax. it has a beautiful tone - much better than the blessing sax that i hired during my high school years. the higher and lower registers play almost just as easily as the middle registers.

now, there's something i want to ask you. it was advertised as an omega "selmer series" sax. this implies that it's supposed to be new omega selmer sax. i've seen that there's been a hot debate over the "new" selmer omega. i understand that if there is something as a new selmer omega (as some of you believe) it has no correlation to the old 80's omega. many of you think that selmer hasn't produced a single omega saxophone for a very long time.

my sax has an "omega" engraved on the bell (the word "selmer" doesn't appear anywhere) and right underneath the "omega" it has the number "0202249" (is this the serial number?). even if this isn't a selmer make the sax still plays beautifully. any help would be very much appreciated.

Skoothondjie
02-23-2009, 02:44 PM
hi everyone. i bought a secondhand alto sax a week ago for just under $500. the previous owner payed just under $900. it has hardly ever been played on and doesn't have a scratch or dent. i imagine it to be an intermediate sax due to the fact that the tone is amazing and that the higher and lower registers are almost just as easy to play as the middle registers. it cannot be compared to the blessing sax that i hired during my high school years. that was a piece of crap.

the previous owner advertised this sax as an omega selmer series. this isn't the old omega (that was replaced during the late 80's or early 90's with the 100-series, i think), but a newer model that has no connection to the old selmer omega. i see that there's a hot debate on this topic.

my sax has "omega" engraved on the bell and right underneath the engraving it has the number "0202249" (is this the serial number?). do any of you know of saxes similar to my one? any help would be very much appreciated.

neehaw
02-24-2009, 08:15 AM
Hello, Glad you enjoy your new saxophone, although I don't think it has anything to do with Selmer. (The engraving style, serial, etc., are very un-Selmerish.) It could be Asian in origin.

bearbait
02-28-2009, 07:12 PM
I guess this one would be an "Omega/AS100" too? This horn was purchased new in the early '90's. I can't find the original docs indicating model # but the serial # is 829,XXX. I don't play that much anymore and have had offers to buy it, but I really have no idea what would be a fair asking price.

rmp
02-28-2009, 07:16 PM
I guess this one would be an "Omega/AS100" too? This horn was purchased new in the early '90's. I can't find the original docs indicating model # but the serial # is 829,XXX. I don't play that much anymore and have had offers to buy it, but I really have no idea what would be a fair asking price.

That looks pretty darn similar to my 820,XXX model Omega Alto (USA Pro).

Raspberry 007
03-15-2009, 01:51 AM
I guess this one would be an "Omega/AS100" too? This horn was purchased new in the early '90's. I can't find the original docs indicating model # but the serial # is 829,XXX. I don't play that much anymore and have had offers to buy it, but I really have no idea what would be a fair asking price.

That is a beautiful horn. Why did Selmer (USA) stop making it? Wait, they moved their manufacturing center to Taiwan and Conn-Selmer is focused on killing industry in Elkhart and profiting out the wazoo on Selmer (Paris) horns. I played a tenor version of the same horn--simply amazing. Don't sell it.

DaveKessler
03-15-2009, 01:57 AM
I guess this one would be an "Omega/AS100" too? This horn was purchased new in the early '90's. I can't find the original docs indicating model # but the serial # is 829,XXX. I don't play that much anymore and have had offers to buy it, but I really have no idea what would be a fair asking price.

That is a beautiful horn. Why did Selmer (USA) stop making it? Wait, they moved their manufacturing center to Taiwan and Conn-Selmer is focused on killing industry in Elkhart and profiting out the wazoo on Selmer (Paris) horns. I played a tenor version of the same horn--simply amazing. Don't sell it.

I wouldnt quite say they are focused on "killing (the) industry in Elkhart" considering that they have moved all the Leblanc production now to Elkhart (both USA and France models) as well as now making the new Avanti Flutes and Leblanc Bliss models in Elkhart.

Frankly, the last versions of the Selmer USA instruments, the quality was not there, especially at their price points.

I personally hope that they do bring back some sax manufacturing to the USA, perhaps as a USA/Taiwan hybrid (kind of like the Branchers in a way).

Raspberry 007
03-15-2009, 02:12 AM
I guess this one would be an "Omega/AS100" too? This horn was purchased new in the early '90's. I can't find the original docs indicating model # but the serial # is 829,XXX. I don't play that much anymore and have had offers to buy it, but I really have no idea what would be a fair asking price.

That is a beautiful horn. Why did Selmer (USA) stop making it? Wait, they moved their manufacturing center to Taiwan and Conn-Selmer is focused on killing industry in Elkhart and profiting out the wazoo on Selmer (Paris) horns. I played a tenor version of the same horn--simply amazing. Don't sell it.

I wouldnt quite say they are focused on "killing (the) industry in Elkhart" considering that they have moved all the Leblanc production now to Elkhart (both USA and France models) as well as now making the new Avanti Flutes and Leblanc Bliss models in Elkhart.

Frankly, the last versions of the Selmer USA instruments, the quality was not there, especially at their price points.

I personally hope that they do bring back some sax manufacturing to the USA, perhaps as a USA/Taiwan hybrid (kind of like the Branchers in a way).

The production cost per unit for LeBlanc (USA) will be lower than it was in France. Conn-Selmer is benefiting quite considerably from this LeBlanc venture. Also, think about your statement re. quality control of Conn-Selmer regarding their saxophones; how does that now apply to LeBlanc clarinets--quality control is quality control. Where's the shift? What has changed?

I am a huge fan of Selmer (Paris), but Conn-Selmer's not some benign entity. I think we will agree that their mark-up on Selmer (Paris) horns borders on the absurd and dramatically limits your retail sale capacity. Can you pull 13&#37; in on a Selmer (Paris) instrument or is Conn-Selmer eating the profit themselves?

Also, Steinway's year-end report stated, "Action Plan

-- Since June 1, 2008, the Company has reduced its workforce by 13%. In
addition, production days at many of its facilities have been cut to
further reduce expenses.

-- The Company has suspended pay increases for its salaried employees and
is taking steps to suspend, eliminate or reduce many of its benefit
programs. The Company is prepared to make additional global workforce
and cost reductions should conditions worsen beyond current
expectations."

I don't know anything about Avanti flutes, but I am glad to see they are creating some jobs in Elkhart.

1saxman
04-11-2009, 11:29 PM
Let's just all toast each other because we have some wonderful 'made in USA' saxes under the 'Selmer USA' pro-line marketing. I wouldn't take anything for my alto and tenor. Out of the two sax men in my regular band, there are three of them - two tenors in the 8255xx range and my 821009 alto. They're all solid, heavy horns with a rich sound. These horns were made by the same people in Elkhart who finished the Paris horns, but Selmer Paris would not allow them to be MK VI copies. The difference from the MK VI is the beauty of these - they have the typical Selmer feel and key layout, but have a wonderfully different, more 'American' sound. I think of the tenor as a heavy-duty Super 20 with Selmer keywork. How hot it that? When they stopped making these in Elkhart, we lost something which most likely will never be replaced.

rmp
04-11-2009, 11:57 PM
I still like mine and it's been a great horn over the years, but it is crazy flat in the lower register these days. May be my out of practice chops - not sure, but I don't remember it being this out of wack when it was younger...

Ryan
8204XX Alto

rmp
04-19-2009, 06:09 PM
Are now here:

http://picasaweb.google.com/rmplum/SelmerUSACatalog#

picasa doesn't seem to want to let me imbed the images directly in the post. I'll keep working on it...

superkev
07-03-2009, 03:21 PM
From my experience with the AS100....the change from the Omega 162 to
AS100 occured during the 825xxx serial range. I'm not sure when this happened with the tenors. The current Omega name on Selmer saxes is a student model horn Tiawan made La Voix. This name was available to select dealers as a way to make comparison shopping a little harder, and were part of a step-up program that Selmer offered dealers that did not seem to catch on. These horns have different engraving and a different case, and are no different than the standard La Voix for tenor or alto. They were not to be advertised on-line either.
I have a silver plated alto in the transition range at 825xxx and a lacquer alto at 829xxx. The lacquer alto is comparitively more resistive than the earlier model before and after repadding for both instruments. I have and do test play many saxes in many brands and still use my siver AS100 as my standard of comparison! These early model Omegas/AS/162, whatever you want to call them, are spectacular playing and sounding horns. Huge sound, massive dynamic range, and excellent pitch are the hallmarks of these horns.
As a side note, Selmer USA is very hot on manufacturing a pro model sax here in the US. The Omega/162 tooling still exists as well as the Super 20 tooling. The Super 20 metal composition has proven to be difficult to recreate, so the Omega remains a good candidate for a reboot.

SelmerParis
12-20-2009, 06:57 AM
The Super 20 metal composition has proven to be difficult to recreate, so the Omega remains a good candidate for a reboot.

Hmmm, I question that. Should be a relatively easy matter to identify and replicate any given metal formulation. Sounds like a rumor or "conventional wisdom" not based on fact. Can you back this up with any data or facts? Not trying to throw stones, just asking if more light can be shed on this.

superkev
12-21-2009, 02:44 PM
I was at the Bach plant this past July for a Road Rep. summit, and was told by Craig Denny (director of marketing for saxes) that the metal composition could not be duplicated as they have tried a couple of test runs on these horns. He did not elaborate on the specifics of the metals, only that they have not had success with what they have tried so far.

lehtonale
04-16-2010, 05:21 PM
Yes, I think a 828xxx would be a AS100. No identifying model name on the sax. A very good, US-made sax. Prices go from $500 to $1200. Considering the alternatives in that range, these horns are hot.

I agree. My Selmer USA has a number 825xxx and it was named AS-100, when I bought it in NY year 1989.

rmp
05-05-2011, 02:15 PM
I have reposted some of the pictures. Hope this is helpful

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/58/167715625_2a41038d80_z.jpg?zz=1 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rmplum/167715625/)

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/73/167715628_d3e04ea6ea_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rmplum/167715628/)

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/66/167715630_e8cd65ad58_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rmplum/167715630/)

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/63/167715631_5a2c609feb_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rmplum/167715631/)

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/56/167715637_ae8e5942ea_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rmplum/167715637/)


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/47/167715638_49c85d91f9_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rmplum/167715638/)

altofreak
05-31-2011, 03:45 AM
I'm in Hong Kong and the only Selmer I can buy are Series II, Series III, Aristocrat AS600 & Selmer Omega. I know that Aristocrat are made in Taiwan and both Series II & III are made in Paris, so, where's Selmer Omega manufactured? I cannot found any information about Omega via Selmer website. Thanks!

I think Aristocrat (AS600) is now made in Vietnam. The quality has dropped off significantly since the move. I won't recommend it to anyone.

1saxman
08-20-2011, 12:44 AM
I'd want to see a picture... that serial number isn't that far from my alto's, and mine is definitely a model 162.

828xxx is no longer an 'Omega' model 162. Only the early ones with the plain brass bar for high F# and round pearl side F# key are model 162 'Omegas'. The later ones are still great saxes but had some styling changes.

1saxman
08-20-2011, 12:48 AM
I still like mine and it's been a great horn over the years, but it is crazy flat in the lower register these days. May be my out of practice chops - not sure, but I don't remember it being this out of wack when it was younger...

Ryan
8204XX Alto

Yes, you have a model 162 'Omega'. Mine is 821009. I had to cut 1/4" off the neck on mine, and I still have to run the mouthpiece way up on the cork. The thing is, the horns were not perfect, and they had a high amount of variability.

rmp
08-22-2011, 04:37 PM
Yes, you have a model 162 'Omega'. Mine is 821009. I had to cut 1/4" off the neck on mine, and I still have to run the mouthpiece way up on the cork. The thing is, the horns were not perfect, and they had a high amount of variability.

Huh - interesting. Is it still ok up high with that metal removed? I guess so....

Steve Stockham
10-15-2011, 03:39 PM
My Selmer model 162 (ser. 820xxx) had lost it's original neck and was replaced with what I believe to be either an AS100 or (more likely) an AS 110 neck as the style was correct but the lacquer was regular gold vs the rose gold of the 162 series. I also experienced needing to push the mouthpiece all the way up the cork to get it in tune.
Thanks to some advice from here on SOTW, I started looking for a Mk VI neck to put on it. I eventually found one on ebay that had been replated in gold which was beeing offered for less than any others by a significant amount but no takers(?) I wondered if there was something wrong with it but decided to offer the minimum amount and I won it. When it showed up, it looked fantastic! In fact, it looked too nice for my sax but since I was already used to a neck that didn't match, so what? I put it on and the difference was startling! The sax not only had less resistance with playing but the sound was somehow richer too (possibly due to the freer airflow?) It's amazing that a neck change can do that to a sax! I compared the two necks and the AS neck does not have quite the angle of the Mk VI neck. Other than that, it's not readilly apparent what the differences are. I'm sure it has to do with bore and diameter and taper and this and that but I never realized how much these little differences could magnify up to the entire instrument!
I now have what I consider to be my alto! It plays superbly and it's ergonomics are entirely acceptable! Even with the cost of the Mk VI neck (and a few mouthpieces until I found one that worked for me) the cost was still only a fraction of what I would have payed for a Mk VI! I will always be a Selmer man as I grew up with Selmer as the name in saxophones but I believe I can widen the tent to allow another Selmer brand in. The model 162 and it's tenor counterpart, the model 164 are different than their Mk VI Parisian cousins but they hold their own and really give you a great sax sound ( at least the model 162 alto does when mated with a Mk VI neck! I wonder what the 164 tenor would play like with a tenor Mk VI neck? Hmm....)

Steve Stockham
12-18-2011, 08:14 PM
Just as a bit of added information, I was at one of our high schools substituting for a band teacher and noticed a Selmer case in the office next to some student instruments so I took a peek! It turns out that the instrument was a Selmer USA alto with the serial number of 8234xx. There reason I'm bringing it up is that this sax had the pearl F# key rather than the bar. The floral design was quite extensive and the gold lacquer seemed to have darkened with age almost to the rose gold color of the Model 162. I believe I was looking at one of the first AS100's. From my perspective, there really isn't any real differences other than that! One was considered a professional model and one ane intermediate model but in reality, they are virtually identical! It looks as if the Model 162 started with 820xxx and concluded with 823xxx. So only 3000 or so saxes were ever Omegas (Model 162's).

rmp
12-20-2011, 02:06 PM
There is an 820XXX on "the Bay" right now, but with the pearl F# key that the later horns had. My 8204XX Omega has the brass F# bar.

It looks to be in very nice shape, and must be one of the earliest horns with the pearl key there.

Steve Stockham
04-20-2012, 07:03 PM
It really does seem that there isn't an exact correlation between when everything changed over and a particular serial number! I would say that, if you have one of the ones with clear lacquer, a teardrop F# key and/or elaborate floral engraving and your serial number is 86xxxx or greater but not above 1xxxxxx, then you have an AS100/AS110. If you have one with the darker Rose Gold lacquer, an F# bar and a serial number from 80xxxx up to 83xxxx you definitely have a Model 162 "Omega" (not engraved!) alto. If you have one between 83xxxx and 85xxxx, it's possible that some elements of the two could find their way onto your model. Does it really matter? It would seem to be a difference that makes no difference as every one of these changes is cosmetic.

vsj725
05-07-2012, 05:40 AM
I'm curious... Were there any Selmer USA 9xx,xxx horns or did both the alto and tenor lines jump from 8xx,xxx to 1,xxx,xxx?

Steve Stockham
05-07-2012, 03:29 PM
I don't believe there were any 9xxxxx serial numbers assigned. When they completely changed the sax design from AS110 to AS220 they jumped to 1xxx,xxx. (Oh, by the way, in my previous post there should have been a 2 after the 8 and before the 3, 5 or 6... my bad!)

romjader
06-06-2013, 11:14 PM
do you know any selmer usa 162 for sale? rom

vsj725
06-27-2013, 05:36 AM
do you know any selmer usa 162 for sale? rom

I occasionally check eBay for these horns. An Omega/162 or AS-100 will pop up every 3-4 months. The few I've seen lately have, in my opinion, all been over priced ($1900 or more). You just have to keep checking every couple of weeks and eventually you'll run across one.

There is a TS-100 for sale right now that looks to be in pristine condition. It almost looks like it's never been taken out of the case. They're asking $1850 for it and if I didn't already own one and was in the market, I'd pounce on that.