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Nefertiti
09-07-2011, 03:07 PM
I've asked this before about a flute but can't remember what people said. I have a silver sax and it's getting that brown tarnish all over it. What's the best way to get this off that is safe for the sax? Ive had it sitting out on a stand for a few months........does it tarnish less if you keep it in the case? Thanks, Steve

Dr G
09-07-2011, 03:10 PM
I prefer Haggerty's Silver Polish - and yes, if you have a lot of "stuff" in the air (especially sulfur), keeping the horn in its case will help.

MLP1956
09-07-2011, 03:16 PM
On silver trumpets all I ever used was Selmer silver polishing cloths. And yes. the more it is exposed --the faster it tarnishes.

Souportwenty
09-07-2011, 03:31 PM
Wasn't there a thread a while ago that mentioned someone on SOTW was thinking of selling some special bags (or something like that) for silver instruments?

davevillajr
09-07-2011, 03:33 PM
I remember flute players in college keeping one of those "paper strip" thingies in the case to help retard tarnishing after polishing.

"Somebody's name" sliver strips I think? Like 3M, or Haggerty's or something?

I can't find them in any stores anymore, but you might do a google for them - supposedly they help, I don't know, I've never tried them.

dv

Dave Dolson
09-07-2011, 04:46 PM
I use silver-polishing mitts (gloves) found in fine dinnerware stores. I also use a treated silver-polishing cloth, and have used a q-tip dipped in silver-dip fluid to access the tighter spaces. I think exposure to the open air is not a good thing for any instrument, unless you don't care (and I don't for certain instruments I keep out for convenience). DAVE

cvsimson
09-07-2011, 05:25 PM
Steve,
Haggerty's is a good choice. If it has needle springs, polishing it can be painful.
After I play mine I let their pads air-dry for a few hours and then keep them in the case with the 3M trips. That will avoid tarnish for very long periods of time (years).

cvsimson
09-07-2011, 05:28 PM
PS: Keep any polishing liquid or paste away from the mechanism (rods). If it gets in the moving parts it will wear them out due to the abrasive stuff in it.
Polishing cloth is safer in that sense.

bruce bailey
09-07-2011, 06:09 PM
Those silver paper (3M) only work for a short time and cannot be exposed to a lot of open air. As mentioned, leaving a horn out of the case will cause severe tarnishing. I take the keys off, clean the body around the posts with Tarn-X, dry, and hand polish with a liquid polish such as Haggerty's.
Leaving a horn out of the case for a week will start the browning under the keys. Wipe all fingerprints off the horn and put it in the case as soon as you are finished playing.

hgiles
09-07-2011, 06:19 PM
Those silver paper (3M) only work for a short time and cannot be exposed to a lot of open air. As mentioned, leaving a horn out of the case will cause severe tarnishing. I take the keys off, clean the body around the posts with Tarn-X, dry, and hand polish with a liquid polish such as Haggerty's.
Leaving a horn out of the case for a week will start the browning under the keys. Wipe all fingerprints off the horn and put it in the case as soon as you are finished playing.

+1...

maddenma
09-08-2011, 02:46 AM
So here's the deal. Forget the 3M strips. They don't work worth beans....

Now that's it's brown, strip the horn down and polish it with Hagerty's Silver Polish. Avoid breaking the springs. Make sure you get the residue out of everything that moves, as it is slightly abrasive and will wear the rods and pivots over time. Very soft cloths (terry towels or better, but no t-shirts) will cover the larger areas, but you will want a horse hair brush that's about the size of a tooth brush to get in the tight spots to remove the residue.

DO NOT dunk the horn in water, and avoid dipping methods of tarnish removal. Hagerty's is really your only safe choice.

Now that you have it cleaned, do three things.

1. Wax it. (an automotive paste wax will do). This will put a transparent protective film on it that will keep most of the air from getting to it.

2. Reassemble the horn, clean and lubricate all the rods and posts with key oil.

3. Get yourself a yard or two of "Pacific Silver Cloth", go down to your local dry cleaner, and have them sew it into a saxophone-sized laundry bag for you -- including a draw string. You'll need to give them the dimensions of the bag, and be sure to make it a little loose so it isn't snagging the horn as you take it in and out of the bag.

Finally, store your horn in the bag and in the case, and you won't be polishing again for a very long time. I did my alto last year, had the bag made, and have been doing this and there is no sign of any tarnish reappearing -- yet.

The silver cloth acts sort of like a sacrificial anode and keeps the horn from tarnishing while in the case. The cloth is impregnated with silver and tarnishes the bag, rather than your horn.

You can get it here.

http://www.silverguard.com/c-6-pacific-silvercloth.aspx

The cloth costs about $30 for 2 yards, the labor to make the bag should be in the $15 range.

saxmusicguy
09-08-2011, 06:10 AM
Assume a horn owner is not concerned about appearance. In that case, is there any harm in letting the horn tarnish as much as it wants? Is there a risk of irreparable permanent tarnish?

Stephen Howard
09-08-2011, 08:16 AM
Assume a horn owner is not concerned about appearance. In that case, is there any harm in letting the horn tarnish as much as it wants? Is there a risk of irreparable permanent tarnish?

Yes, there is.
Tarnish is the first stage of a corrosive process, which if left to its own devices will continue and develop into corrosion proper. In the case of silver plate, the brown stains eventually go black and start to eat into the silver. When the stains are removed there will be evidence of pitting on the silver. In some cases this pitting can break through to the metal below.
It takes quite some time for this to happen as a rule, and in that time you're more likely to see damage to the plating through simple wear and tear (i.e. on the palm key touchpieces etc.).

And whereas a lacquered horn that loses its lacquer can look distinguished, and a bare brass horn that tarnishes can look cool - a silver-plated horn that's gone black just looks shabby.

Regards,

saxmusicguy
09-08-2011, 08:24 AM
Yes, there is.

Thanks for the info. Is the Pacific Silver Cloth chemically treated with caustic substances, in addition to having the silver impregnation?

windman53
09-08-2011, 09:34 AM
Yes, there is a high chance. But if you dilute with enough water, it might be worth trying.

Captain Beeflat
09-08-2011, 10:40 AM
Perhaps I dreamt it, but I could swear that I read of an aerosol foam which could be squirted over the horn, then, after a while, washed off..... Sparkle sparkle!
If such a product does not exist then someone should get busy & develop it.
The advice given about keeping the horn in it's case is all very well....except if you wish to play it at frequent intervals during the day....my horn lives on it's stand to be available at all times....obviously, for the reasons given, it tarnishes. Hey Ho.

cvsimson
09-08-2011, 03:31 PM
Captain,
I also would like to play my horn at frequent intervals during the day, but my boss and the other folks at the office won't let me... :cry:

If I were good enough to play the sax professionally and not to need another job, I would have the same issue. But maybe if it is not your main horn it would still be OK to keep it in the case. in between playing sessions.

Dr G
09-08-2011, 03:48 PM
The advice given about keeping the horn in it's case is all very well....except if you wish to play it at frequent intervals during the day....my horn lives on it's stand to be available at all times....obviously, for the reasons given, it tarnishes. Hey Ho.

You could try making the bag as suggested above and drape it over your horn when on the stand. I can't claim that as an original thought, the flute people have been doing it for years - I just hadn't considered it an option for saxophones until now.

Alley Cat
09-08-2011, 04:11 PM
Cool.
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn250/lorrysax/Saxophones/DSCF1557.jpg

Shabby.
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn250/lorrysax/Saxophones/FUhPfoxg0avW131534129894P4814.jpg

SchlockRod
09-08-2011, 04:17 PM
A big 10-4 to maddenma, and also Dr.G. Yeah what they said.
My wife sewed me a nice bag of Pacific Silvercloth, with a drawstring. I love it and I'm sure the horn does, too.
A few other notes:
The big chemical contributors to tarnish (in some rough order of some combined assessment of their prevalence in the environment/potential to do damage):
1. Sulfur and its associated compounds (like sulfur dioxide). Sulfur is in motor fuels, though less so now than in the old days. It is also in coal. So it and its compounds are more or less of a factor depending on where/when your horn is/was. Some geographic areas have way more of these compounds in the air than others.
2. Water/moisture. I think this is much less tarnish-promoting than sulfur, but more prevalent in the environment. Probably a good idea to dry off your horn and keep it covered (or better still in its case if in a humid climate).
3. Hydrocarbons. The main source of these would be motor fuels, but I don't think normal atmospheric quantities are much of a contributor. But it's probably a good idea to keep your horn out of, say, a garage with old cars sitting in it that smells like gasoline.
4. Wool. I learned that this promotes tarnish from I think the Society of American Silversmiths website, after I read on some horn website that WOOL yarn makes the best polishing tool for between key posts and such. Try some other kind of yarn instead.
Go to the Society of American Silversmiths website for really authoritative info on silver care.
They also mention there that if the tarnish is just getting started (yellowish/brownish hue to the metal) you can remove it with Purell hand cleaner. I would think this is preferable to Haggerty's or other abrasive polishes (though Haggerty's has its place - removing blackish tarnish).
Also, turn over your polishing cloth frequently when using Haggerty's. The tarnish itself is actually very abrasive. Wash the cloth (or gloves) before it gets too black, then re-use with fresh polish.

Dr G
09-08-2011, 04:53 PM
Nice summary, Rod. Thanks.

I guess I'm getting away with a relatively tarnish-free experience because I live in an arid, low tech region - high desert.

Now you've got me concerned that if/when I make my move to a more civilized part of the world, I may have to polish my tenor more often.

SchlockRod
09-08-2011, 04:59 PM
One more thing.
Rubber is also a tarnish-promoter.
So if you have a sax stand with rubber grippers it may tarnish your horn. I've seen them with knitted "booties" over the rubber parts.

Kermit
09-08-2011, 05:17 PM
You could use a jewelry polishing cloth, or even better, a polishing cloth sold by a music store. I remember a few years ago I took my 1980ish Bundy flute in for service, and at the same time, I also took my solid silver Yani soprano. The flute was a bit tarnished, and the tech gave me a polishing cloth to use on it, but he said absolutely not to use it on the sax. I'm not sure why, maybe because there's a thin layer of clear lacquer on the sax??? But it works great on the flute. And I think I could probably also use it on my Yamaha silver-plated tenor, but I've never needed to because I store it in its case, so it doesn't tarnish. (Neither does the Yani.)

Dr G
09-08-2011, 05:52 PM
... the tech gave me a polishing cloth to use on it, but he said absolutely not to use it on the sax. I'm not sure why, maybe because there's a thin layer of clear lacquer on the sax???

Yes, Yanagisawa puts clear coat over their silver and silver plate.

Hmmmm, wouldn't that affect the tone coming from the silver plate??? What's the point?

Captain Beeflat
09-08-2011, 06:09 PM
You could try making the bag as suggested above and drape it over your horn when on the stand. I can't claim that as an original thought, the flute people have been doing it for years - I just hadn't considered it an option for saxophones until now.
Many thanks for a good suggestion.
However, I have taken the easy (coward's?) way out....I have put away my silver plated horn in it's case & substituted it for an un-lacquered tenor...any deterioration to that horn will be an aesthetic improvement.

Dr G
09-08-2011, 06:15 PM
Many thanks for a good suggestion.
However, I have taken the easy (coward's?) way out....I have put away my silver plated horn in it's case & substituted it for an un-lacquered tenor...any deterioration to that horn will be an aesthetic improvement.

He shoots, he scores! Yet another "reason" to have a spare tenor. That nails it. I'm going for it.

Unlacquered Buescher Super 400 for those days when I don't want to contribute to the tarnish on my Borg'.

Think my wife will understand???

maddenma
09-08-2011, 10:54 PM
Thanks for the info. Is the Pacific Silver Cloth chemically treated with caustic substances, in addition to having the silver impregnation?

Couldn't tell you what it's treated with. Can't think of too many cloth's that aren't chemically treated with something at somepoint in the manufacturing process.

FWIW, I don't believe you're supposed to wear it. You also aren't supposed to wash it, or the silver comes out and it doesn't work any more.

maddenma
09-08-2011, 10:55 PM
You could try making the bag as suggested above and drape it over your horn when on the stand. I can't claim that as an original thought, the flute people have been doing it for years - I just hadn't considered it an option for saxophones until now.

If you do pull the drawstring tight, otherwise you're letting air in and around the horn.

maddenma
09-08-2011, 11:02 PM
Many thanks for a good suggestion.
However, I have taken the easy (coward's?) way out....I have put away my silver plated horn in it's case & substituted it for an un-lacquered tenor...any deterioration to that horn will be an aesthetic improvement.

I don't leave my silver horns out. An unlacquered bari and a tenor and soprano both in gold plate don't mind though.

saxmusicguy
09-09-2011, 02:53 AM
Can't think of too many cloth's that aren't chemically treated with something at somepoint in the manufacturing process.

Yes, but I wondered if it was heavily treated with a special chemical to aid its function.

Dr G
09-09-2011, 03:21 AM
If you do pull the drawstring tight, otherwise you're letting air in and around the horn.

Unless you draw a vacuum, there remains air surrounding the horn.

bandmommy
09-09-2011, 03:23 AM
Wool yarn causes tarnish? How?!?
All commercialy produced and some homespun wool yarn has been washed several times in nearly boiling water and detergent to remove ALL traces of lanolin, sweat, dirt, and manure.
It is then rinsed several times to remove all traces of the detergent. You could drink the final rinse water.
After that it is carded and spun into yarn.
There is nothing in the yarn itself that would promote tarnish unless it was exposed to outside contaminants like your own body oils.

maddenma
09-09-2011, 03:32 AM
Unless you draw a vacuum, there remains air surrounding the horn.

Of course, but you can reduce the circulation and introduction of new sulfer by pulling the drawstring tight. That way, any air circulation must come through the sulfer trap that is the bag, as opposed to up from the bottom without any intervention.

Were you thinking that the sulfer somehow only came in from the top like rain? :)

maddenma
09-09-2011, 03:34 AM
Yes, but I wondered if it was heavily treated with a special chemical to aid its function.

Not to my knowledge. The silver impregnated in the cloth is supposed to attract the sulfer ions before they get to your horn. Never say never, and I'm not completely sure, but I suspect that's enough to do its job without other chemicals.

maddenma
09-09-2011, 03:36 AM
Wool yarn causes tarnish? How?!?
All commercialy produced and some homespun wool yarn has been washed several times in nearly boiling water and detergent to remove ALL traces of lanolin, sweat, dirt, and manure.
It is then rinsed several times to remove all traces of the detergent. You could drink the final rinse water.
After that it is carded and spun into yarn.
There is nothing in the yarn itself that would promote tarnish unless it was exposed to outside contaminants like your own body oils.

An interesting thought. Does wool have a natural sulfer content? It is, afterall, exposure to sulfer that we're primarily interested in.

I did find this at the NIH website, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1187640/


When the diet of sheep is supplemented by the infusion of sulphur-containing amino acids or casein into the abomasum, the newly synthesized wool shows characteristic changes in its amino acid composition, with significant increases in cystine, proline and serine and decreases in aspartic acid and phenylalanine. This modification seems to be due entirely to an alteration in the overall composition of the high-sulphur proteins and to an increase in their proportion in the fibre. These variations are not the result of a change in the composition of individual proteins, but are due to alterations in their relative proportions and to the initiation of the synthesis of `new' proteins, many of which are extremely rich in cystine. It is suggested that the heterogeneity of the high-sulphur proteins may be due, in part, to similar changes in composition caused by natural variations in the nutrition of sheep.


Who knew?!?

saxmusicguy
09-09-2011, 04:18 AM
Not to my knowledge. The silver impregnated in the cloth is supposed to attract the sulfer ions before they get to your horn. Never say never, and I'm not completely sure, but I suspect that's enough to do its job without other chemicals.

How long does it last before replacement is required?

bandmommy
09-09-2011, 04:22 AM
My sheep are on pasture during the summer months, and hay in the winter. I'll have to check the sulphur levels in comercially produced feeds to see if there is 'enough' to contaminate the wool fiber.
I don't feed those unless one of the ewes is having trouble keeping on weight while the lambs are still on the teat.
I still don't think that wool is responsible for tarnishing silver, but I'll do a little more 'research'.

bandmommy
09-09-2011, 05:40 AM
Ok... I put on the old bifocals, dragged out my dusty 'Sheep Production Handbook' and did some reading.
Evidentally sheep use the sulphur that occurs naturally in thier forage for the production of their wool.
"Each wool cell is made up of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, and sulfur, constituents of 19 different amino acids."

I stand corrected in that wool may lead to the tarnishing of silver.
I wonder how many vintage cases are lined with wool felt...

SchlockRod
09-09-2011, 03:58 PM
Thanks bandmommy for insight from an actual sheep person. I was wondering myself how wool could make tarnish. I thought maybe they meant moisture within, say, wool felt in an old musty case or something.
Anyway, as for the Pacific Silvercloth, from what I read in buying it, it only contains silver that functions as a sacrificial anode (to tarnish in lieu of our horn's finish). I believe they said also that it is good for like 20 years if you don't wash it.

asterix2k10
09-09-2011, 04:42 PM
I recently acquired a tarnished silver ligature. To clean it, I first soaked it in boiling water with aluminum foil and baking soda for a few minutes. I also tried rubbing it with a little white vinegar, and finally scrubbed it with toothpaste and a toothbrush. I don't know if these are good things to do to a horn, but it worked pretty well for the ligature.

maddenma
09-09-2011, 10:27 PM
How long does it last before replacement is required?

According to what I've read, the anti-tarnish properties last about 25 years -- assuming you don't wash it. I would guess that varies a little by the sulfer content of the air in your environment. I also suspect, but can't confirm, that the fabric would probably get pretty fragile long before then.

maddenma
09-09-2011, 10:45 PM
I recently acquired a tarnished silver ligature. To clean it, I first soaked it in boiling water with aluminum foil and baking soda for a few minutes. I also tried rubbing it with a little white vinegar, and finally scrubbed it with toothpaste and a toothbrush. I don't know if these are good things to do to a horn, but it worked pretty well for the ligature.

Works fine on a lig. A lig costs very little to get replated or replaced.

I've written about this several time regarding dips and electrolysis (warm water and aluminum), but here's another round for those that haven't discovered the Google search on the board.

A dip (including Tarn-X) or electrolysis does indeed remove sulfer out of the silver sulfate (tarnish) on the horn and yields very fast/easy results.

Ignoring for a moment the opportunity to cause rust in steel pivots and other bits of the horn that come from contact with water, unfortunately, what it also does is leave microscopic holes in the finish where the sulfer used to be. This creates a "sponge-like" surface on the plating that actually attracts tarnish faster and over time makes it very difficult to keep clean.

A "good" polish, such as Hagerty's, not only leaves the surface intact, but leaves a protective coating behind that resists (for awhile) future tarnishing. This is why jewelers and silver-smiths recommend a polish over a dip or electrolytic approach to tarnish removal -- unless the horn has just completely turned to black and that's the only method left that will leave something silver-like on the horn.

Avoid dips and electrolysis.

Dr G
09-09-2011, 11:01 PM
Of course, but you can reduce the circulation and introduction of new sulfer by pulling the drawstring tight. That way, any air circulation must come through the sulfer trap that is the bag, as opposed to up from the bottom without any intervention.

Were you thinking that the sulfer somehow only came in from the top like rain? :)

No need to be a contentious jerk about it, Mad'. Any such intervention is only a first approximation - no one said that the bag couldn't reach the floor and thus limit circulation.

maddenma
09-09-2011, 11:30 PM
No need to be a contentious jerk about it, Mad'. Any such intervention is only a first approximation - no one said that the bag couldn't reach the floor and thus limit circulation.

Sorry, guess I had that coming. That was meant to be a tongue-in-cheek comment rather than foot-in-mouth one.... :faceinpalm: Many apologies! :friendhug:

I have found that simply reaching the floor isn't enough -- sulfer finds a way in. However, keeping it in the bag and in the case while not in use has done wonders for keeping my alto shiny -- and I do like my shiny. :mrgreen:

sksaxgirl
12-06-2012, 08:21 PM
Just the thread I was looking for. I like the ideas of getting silvercloth bags made. Thanks for all the suggestions everyone. Sounds like my silver horn is going to be a lot of work...

derekhogue
12-07-2012, 08:00 AM
I know ways that you can remove that tarnish. First is by using baking soda, you need to sprinkle baking soda on cloth and rub with it until the tarnish is completely gone. Another way is really simple by the use of toothpaste, you need to coat the silver with toothpaste and then put it under warm water and then rinse it. Hope this home remedies would help you to get rid of tarnish. If you don't want to do it yourself then you can get it done from the silver plating services (http://www.artisticplating.net/silver-plating-services.php) provider.

milandro
12-07-2012, 08:18 AM
derekhogue, welcome to SOTW!

When you remove tarnish from a silverplate surface remember that the plating (more so on modern horns than older ones) is VERY thin, the more you do this and he more abrasive anything you use the more material will be removed and will expose more new material underneath to further future oxidisation.

On the other hand leaving black tarnish where it is not a good idea too because it penetrates the plating and causes pitting in the metal. Anyway, whatever home remedies one has (baking soda or (which?) toothpaste ........ I am cringing while reading this!) be very aware that polishing silver equals REMOVING silver from your horn and ultimately will result into wearing it out.

The more aggressive or abrasive the method you use the quicker all this will happen.

Gordon (NZ)
12-07-2012, 08:34 PM
I imagine different brands of toothpaste vary quite a lot in the harshness of the abrasive (pumice powder would be unacceptable on silver) and what other active chemicals are in it. Using this is a can of worms in my book. It was not formulated for silver.

I imagine different brands of toothpaste vary quite a lot in the harshness of the abrasive (pumice powder would be unacceptable on silver) and what other active chemicals are in it. Using this is a can of worms in my book. It was not formulated for silver.

And I agree taht silver plating can be very thin these days.. A decorative plating (for selling purposes) rather than one that could remotely be called durable.


...
On the other hand leaving black tarnish where it is not a good idea too because it penetrates the plating and causes pitting in the metal. ...

I'm not sure that the tarnish of the silver causes the pitting. AFAIK pitting is caused when the base metal is exposed through the plating. This can be through microscopic 'pores" through the silver plating, which are invisible to the naked eye, resulting from low quality plating processes, and certainly more likely to be present with very thin plating or worn-away plating. This exposure allows electrolyte (e.g. salty perspiration or even simply moisture) to be in contact with both the silver and the different base metal. That provides the conditions for "galvanic corrosion" - Google it - which eats away at the metal that is higher in the "galvanic series", which is the base metal, the brass. This eating occurs adjacent to what is left of the plating. Hence hence the pitting.

snowgoose
03-10-2013, 07:47 PM
Does anyone happen to know whether Haggerty's silver cloth is as good as Pacific silver cloth? I notice the Haggerty's which is 58" wide is $18/yard compared to Pacific which is 36" wide is $22.95 and shipping costs are comparable. But it would be a false economy if the Haggerty's isn't as good. Duh.

I have done plenty of sewing over the years and am designing an easy-to-use covering for my silverplate instruments which remain in the case anyway.

keyplyr
03-10-2013, 09:09 PM
The advice given about keeping the horn in it's case is all very well....except if you wish to play it at frequent intervals during the day....my horn lives on it's stand to be available at all times....obviously, for the reasons given, it tarnishes. Hey Ho.

I keep my clarinet, my silver flute and my lacquered sop sax all out on vertical stands, all day, every day. I teach and play them throughout the day. They only go into cases when I move them or for storage.

I had girlfriends make fitted covers from pillow cases. This keeps off the dust and quite a bit of the tarnish off the silver stuff but tarnish still happens, just at a much slower rate. When I see this, I use the treated polishing rag. Tarnish does remain in the nooks & crannies and I do occasionally get out the q-tips.

maddenma
03-11-2013, 01:36 AM
I wasn't aware Hagerty's was selling a silver-impregnated cloth, but it makes sense. 3 years later I'm still getting good results with the Pacific Silver Cloth bags I had made. Just had one made for bari from the material I bought then and the 36" wide bat more than covered it. The false economy might not be in the quality, but in the amount of wasted material.

graphicguy
03-11-2013, 05:03 PM
that's a great tip re qtips, thanks... i like using haggerty's w/old gym socks... good idea for qtips for hard to reach spots between posts

RobSc
03-13-2013, 11:47 PM
Thanks for the Pacific silvercloth tip. I just acquired a Serie III Silver Alto, and after removing some light tarnish, purchased the Pacific silvercloth after reviewing this thread. Haven't made it into a bag yet...got lazy, and just ended up wrapping the sax in the cloth and putting it in the case. We'll see if that works as well as a bag, but it should.... after all, the cloth is also used for silverware and you can just wrap that up in it!

Jazzaferri
03-14-2013, 02:21 AM
Actually, I rather think that ifone wrapped down the body and around the bell it would work even better than a bag although a pain to unravel and wrap again.

Sigmund451
03-14-2013, 03:59 AM
Just one more reason for me to clean up my only silver horn and immediately sell the darned thing!

Someone needs to make an anti tarnish room deodorizer.

Pledge....fabreeze...glade?

Charliefred
03-14-2013, 04:01 AM
Our local cloth store (Handcock) has 'silver cloth' - available by the yard. You can either make a drawsting bag or just wrap your horn with a swath of the material. This cloth is used to make silverware bags, but I use it to store silver wire and other silver stock (I'm an amateur silversmith and wire wrapper).

Charlie

Gordon (NZ)
03-14-2013, 05:16 PM
Silverguard, sold by the yard... http://www.silverguard.com/c-6-pacific-silvercloth-by-the-yard.aspx

maddenma
03-18-2013, 01:28 AM
Lot's of options. Make a bag to make it convenient, wrap it if you don't care to do that, buy it from Pacific, Hagerty or Silverguard. It's largely the same stuff, will work just fine.

Lightyears better than 3M strips in any event.

patmiller
03-18-2013, 08:29 AM
I bought several yards of silver cloth on Amazon and I've sewed bags for some of my silver instruments. They're not fancy with drawstrings though, they have a bit of extra length to fold over and close. In the case of clarinets the extra goes up the bell.

The sewing was easy with a machine. I make them square at first (inside out) with just one hem (which I fold over and flatten with an electric iron) along the open top then a row of stitching down the side and across the bottom.

I've even got a bit fancy lately by putting the horn into the finished bag then pinning the seamed edge into a nicer contour. I then turn the bag inside out and sew the "new" edge and then cut off the excess. From initial measuring to final product is under 15 minutes, but I'm not taking orders :)

Do they work? Well I haven't had them long enough for a tarnish resistance report, but the do give me a nice way of giving the horns a rub as they come and go from the bag.